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Going to give this new " Anterless " Season A Try Tomorrow.


blackbeltbill
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   I give this new early Anterless  Season a big thumbs up! Now this is my 49th year of Hunting and,I have been out probably less then 40 days lifetime looking for the Deer. Usually- just on the Rifle opener. Freeze for a few hours and see nothing. And then skip a few years.

  But,I was out 5 Mornings for this new Anterless  Season. Was very motivated  because of the nice weather, the positive thought of being out before the Bowhunters, and most importantly-- actually  seeing Deer!!

  I saw Deer on 3 of the 5 mornings!  Had a great time out there for a guy who does not hunt deer much. And also found out " where not" to waste my time on the Fall Turkeys later on in mid October. 

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Last few years I thought about sitting out the bow season, but the chilly mornings we've had  snapped me out of it and have me saying to myself, whatta you nuts. I do like the crispy cold mornings for deer. Funny because I'll sit out in May calling Gobblers in 70 degree weather getting eaten by bugs and not care.

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So I traveled to 3M for this hunt last weekend. Being that it was an antlerless hunt of course I saw 1 doe, 5 bucks and had one unknown blow out at about 20yds on the other side of a hedge row. Figures lol. The deer down there are very tolerant of people. Odd hunting. Was sitting on the front porch Sunday morning and this guy literally walks up the driveway, makes a left onto the lawn, jumps the garden fence and stands there. I swear he gave me the finger when we chased him away. 

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44 minutes ago, Enigma said:

Planning on going again next year. Hung out with the salt of the earth and met some new people. Per usual when I visit. Ate like a king and killed some squirrels for gumbo. Life was good.

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Good shooting!  And that 10/22 takedown is one of my favorite guns! 

D3ADBA9E-E198-4668-B52C-490F23D5E111.jpeg

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35 minutes ago, johnplav said:

Good shooting!  And that 10/22 takedown is one of my favorite guns! 

D3ADBA9E-E198-4668-B52C-490F23D5E111.jpeg

I dumassingly left my .22 home. I borrowed that gun from my buddy's son. I was shooting 36g HP, forgot the brand. Took a bit but I got it dialed in. Love the ping, snap and plunk when they hit the ground.

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I dumassingly left my .22 home. I borrowed that gun from my buddy's son. I was shooting 36g HP, forgot the brand. Took a bit but I got it dialed in. Love the ping, snap and plunk when they hit the ground.

All these years Ive been saying dumbassedly!


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I really enjoyed the early antlerless season this year.  I didn't connect on two mature does as I had hoped to going in, but I did manage to take out my primary target one.  She was "the boss" on our farm this year, and was certainly responsible for the destruction of a great deal of the sweetcorn that I planted this spring.   I gained some new appreciation for the challenge and great difficulty involved in killing a specific mature doe, compared to a mature buck.  

My plan for this year's doe, was a matter of tightening the noose thru the season, in such a way that she would not realize that she was being hunted until I was in position to make the final strike.   I baited her with what is undoubtedly the best combination of food-plots that I have ever deployed.  That was centered on 2 acres high-yield RR corn that probably approached 175 bu/acre.  That plot was bordered by Whitetail Institute tall tine tubers (fortunately from seed that I acquired at no cost from a former site member), well maintained 2 year old white clover, a fresh plot of winter wheat, Imperial Whitetail clover, and clover/alfalfa mix (more "free" seed from that same former site member).       

I was as patient as I could be, and didn't hunt that plot area until the wind was as right as could be.  Like several of the mature bucks I have taken here over the years, this old doe was accompanied by a smaller "scout", most likely her doe fawn from the prior year.   Her current year fawn(s) must have been taken out by coyotes, so she was in top physical condition with no milk production to burden her down, when I finally caught up with her on my 6th hunt of the September gun season.  

I had hoped for an east wind, to hunt my popup blind on the west edge of the plot area.  Running out of time on that, I settled on a natural blind on the east side for this hunt, approaching quietly in the prevailing steady SW wind, so as not to alert her in her suspected bedding area that afternoon.   I saw a young buck out feeding on clover on my walk back that afternoon, which was my first deer sighting of the season.   I spooked that buck into the cover walking past him, but he came back out about 20 minutes later, even though he was downwind of me.  I guess a shower in scent-free soap, and a little Evercalm on my shoes and an open half-stick of that on my stand was enough to keep that 1.4 year old from bolting away.

The "scout" doe walked by me 5 yards upwind, about 10 minutes after that little buck went back into the cover far downwind.   There was thick cover between me and the two does on their approach, but I raised my gun on the scout when she got past it.  She caught that motion and bolted, as I swung on her contemplating the running shot, but holding off because she looked too small and did not appear to be "my target".

Thats when I caught a glimpse of the trailing "target" in my periforal vision.  She was putting on the brakes, as the scout was accelerating, making for an easy 10 yard, standing broadside heart shot.  After taking the 240 gr XTP bullet from my 50 cal ML, she bolted off in a big half circle, cutting back thru  some thick cover and emerging in a shooting lane 50 yards away, where she flopped down dead.

Mosquitos were not as bad this September as they were last, probably because of the drought this summer.   Weather conditions were very comfortable throughout and I hunted in a T-shirt most of the time.   I hope this September season continues for many more years.  It is really nice to get out after those does with gun before the bow-hunters spook them all into full nocturnal mode, or the local farmers wipe them out with their nuissance permits.    

    

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4 hours ago, wolc123 said:

I really enjoyed the early antlerless season this year.  I didn't connect on two mature does as I had hoped to going in, but I did manage to take out my primary target one.  She was "the boss" on our farm this year, and was certainly responsible for the destruction of a great deal of the sweetcorn that I planted this spring.   I gained some new appreciation for the challenge and great difficulty involved in killing a specific mature doe, compared to a mature buck.  

My plan for this year's doe, was a matter of tightening the noose thru the season, in such a way that she would not realize that she was being hunted until I was in position to make the final strike.   I baited her with what is undoubtedly the best combination of food-plots that I have ever deployed.  That was centered on 2 acres high-yield RR corn that probably approached 175 bu/acre.  That plot was bordered by Whitetail Institute tall tine tubers (fortunately from seed that I acquired at no cost from a former site member), well maintained 2 year old white clover, a fresh plot of winter wheat, Imperial Whitetail clover, and clover/alfalfa mix (more "free" seed from that same former site member).       

I was as patient as I could be, and didn't hunt that plot area until the wind was as right as could be.  Like several of the mature bucks I have taken here over the years, this old doe was accompanied by a smaller "scout", most likely her doe fawn from the prior year.   Her current year fawn(s) must have been taken out by coyotes, so she was in top physical condition with no milk production to burden her down, when I finally caught up with her on my 6th hunt of the September gun season.  

I had hoped for an east wind, to hunt my popup blind on the west edge of the plot area.  Running out of time on that, I settled on a natural blind on the east side for this hunt, approaching quietly in the prevailing steady SW wind, so as not to alert her in her suspected bedding area that afternoon.   I saw a young buck out feeding on clover on my walk back that afternoon, which was my first deer sighting of the season.   I spooked that buck into the cover walking past him, but he came back out about 20 minutes later, even though he was downwind of me.  I guess a shower in scent-free soap, and a little Evercalm on my shoes and an open half-stick of that on my stand was enough to keep that 1.4 year old from bolting away.

The "scout" doe walked by me 5 yards upwind, about 10 minutes after that little buck went back into the cover far downwind.   There was thick cover between me and the two does on their approach, but I raised my gun on the scout when she got past it.  She caught that motion and bolted, as I swung on her contemplating the running shot, but holding off because she looked too small and did not appear to be "my target".

Thats when I caught a glimpse of the trailing "target" in my periforal vision.  She was putting on the brakes, as the scout was accelerating, making for an easy 10 yard, standing broadside heart shot.  After taking the 240 gr XTP bullet from my 50 cal ML, she bolted off in a big half circle, cutting back thru  some thick cover and emerging in a shooting lane 50 yards away, where she flopped down dead.

Mosquitos were not as bad this September as they were last, probably because of the drought this summer.   Weather conditions were very comfortable throughout and I hunted in a T-shirt most of the time.   I hope this September season continues for many more years.  It is really nice to get out after those does with gun before the bow-hunters spook them all into full nocturnal mode, or the local farmers wipe them out with their nuissance permits.    

    

I enjoyed reading the above!!

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On 9/18/2022 at 7:41 AM, blackbeltbill said:

   I give this new early Anterless  Season a big thumbs up! Now this is my 49th year of Hunting and,I have been out probably less then 40 days lifetime looking for the Deer. Usually- just on the Rifle opener. Freeze for a few hours and see nothing. And then skip a few years.

  But,I was out 5 Mornings for this new Anterless  Season. Was very motivated  because of the nice weather, the positive thought of being out before the Bowhunters, and most importantly-- actually  seeing Deer!!

  I saw Deer on 3 of the 5 mornings!  Had a great time out there for a guy who does not hunt deer much. And also found out " where not" to waste my time on the Fall Turkeys later on in mid October. 

The thing about "nice weather" and deer hunting is that generally the 2 don't go well together. Not that we want rain and wind, but those brisk november mornings are where it's at.

It's kind of funny to see you treat it like a pre-season scouting hunt too. And not in a negative way, because I view turkey season very similar to that for deer. 

Do you think you'll go back out during the regular gun season?

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5 hours ago, blackbeltbill said:

I enjoyed reading the above!!

Thanks Bill.  That was the first deer that I killed from that blind, which has been in place about 5 years.  I made it from an old dock, that I had in my nearby 1/4 acre pond, for about 15 years.  I use to go back there with our girls, when they were young.   We caught a some bluegills and a bullhead  from it.

The platform is about 4 ft up, and lag-bolted to a dying ash tree on one end.  The other side is supported by two 2” steel pipe posts, with a steel crossbeam beam, typical of “dock support” construction.  The chair is a nylon seated swivel barstool with steel legs.

Every year, I trim the bushes  around it (some of which are poison ivy), so that I can shoot over them, yet maintain concealment.

Now that I finally managed to score from it, I will put a little more work into it.   I will start by cutting that dead ash tree off, about 3 feet above the platform height.  That wood will be burned in the woodstove and heat us from the outside this winter, while the doe that I killed from the platform last week, will heat us from the inside.  
 

I think a plastic 5-gallon bucket will fit upside down over the cutoff stump.  That will prevent water absorption into it from the top and maybe get me a few more years before it rots and breaks off.  Removing the top will shed most of the wind loading on the stump.  The bucket will make a good gun rest, for shooting towards my foodplot court.  I will look for a black or gray one so I don’t need to paint it.    
65E0EC00-071A-4399-855C-C5654DAF0E4B.thumb.jpeg.314d2a1dd373f89de3a4ef4a903f4be2.jpeg
 

This is the tree I need to chop off.  Note the poison ivy crawling up the inside.  I will hit that with roundup next spring and hopefully get rid of it.   You can see part of the shooting lane off to the left, which is where that doe flopped down and died.  Both of those antlerless deer approached from the far left, just beyond that leafy brush cover that you can see in the picture.    

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On 9/23/2022 at 2:31 AM, wolc123 said:

I really enjoyed the early antlerless season this year.  I didn't connect on two mature does as I had hoped to going in, but I did manage to take out my primary target one.  She was "the boss" on our farm this year, and was certainly responsible for the destruction of a great deal of the sweetcorn that I planted this spring.   I gained some new appreciation for the challenge and great difficulty involved in killing a specific mature doe, compared to a mature buck.  

My plan for this year's doe, was a matter of tightening the noose thru the season, in such a way that she would not realize that she was being hunted until I was in position to make the final strike.   I baited her with what is undoubtedly the best combination of food-plots that I have ever deployed.  That was centered on 2 acres high-yield RR corn that probably approached 175 bu/acre.  That plot was bordered by Whitetail Institute tall tine tubers (fortunately from seed that I acquired at no cost from a former site member), well maintained 2 year old white clover, a fresh plot of winter wheat, Imperial Whitetail clover, and clover/alfalfa mix (more "free" seed from that same former site member).       

I was as patient as I could be, and didn't hunt that plot area until the wind was as right as could be.  Like several of the mature bucks I have taken here over the years, this old doe was accompanied by a smaller "scout", most likely her doe fawn from the prior year.   Her current year fawn(s) must have been taken out by coyotes, so she was in top physical condition with no milk production to burden her down, when I finally caught up with her on my 6th hunt of the September gun season.  

I had hoped for an east wind, to hunt my popup blind on the west edge of the plot area.  Running out of time on that, I settled on a natural blind on the east side for this hunt, approaching quietly in the prevailing steady SW wind, so as not to alert her in her suspected bedding area that afternoon.   I saw a young buck out feeding on clover on my walk back that afternoon, which was my first deer sighting of the season.   I spooked that buck into the cover walking past him, but he came back out about 20 minutes later, even though he was downwind of me.  I guess a shower in scent-free soap, and a little Evercalm on my shoes and an open half-stick of that on my stand was enough to keep that 1.4 year old from bolting away.

The "scout" doe walked by me 5 yards upwind, about 10 minutes after that little buck went back into the cover far downwind.   There was thick cover between me and the two does on their approach, but I raised my gun on the scout when she got past it.  She caught that motion and bolted, as I swung on her contemplating the running shot, but holding off because she looked too small and did not appear to be "my target".

Thats when I caught a glimpse of the trailing "target" in my periforal vision.  She was putting on the brakes, as the scout was accelerating, making for an easy 10 yard, standing broadside heart shot.  After taking the 240 gr XTP bullet from my 50 cal ML, she bolted off in a big half circle, cutting back thru  some thick cover and emerging in a shooting lane 50 yards away, where she flopped down dead.

Mosquitos were not as bad this September as they were last, probably because of the drought this summer.   Weather conditions were very comfortable throughout and I hunted in a T-shirt most of the time.   I hope this September season continues for many more years.  It is really nice to get out after those does with gun before the bow-hunters spook them all into full nocturnal mode, or the local farmers wipe them out with their nuissance permits.    

    

I like venison too. I am really lucky to have the land and opportunities during season. I also Don't care who's smarter or harder to kill, i just wonder if you ever think the matriarchal doe keeps the rest of the deer using your property? We decided a few years ago to not shoot the oldest does in hopes they keep the herd close? Also we stopped killing does before rut, do you think this will be less "tail" for the bucks to chase in November? Only food for thought,  I have no skin in the game where your at.

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1 hour ago, Kmartinson said:

I like venison too. I am really lucky to have the land and opportunities during season. I also Don't care who's smarter or harder to kill, i just wonder if you ever think the matriarchal doe keeps the rest of the deer using your property? We decided a few years ago to not shoot the oldest does in hopes they keep the herd close? Also we stopped killing does before rut, do you think this will be less "tail" for the bucks to chase in November? Only food for thought,  I have no skin in the game where your at.

I try not to overthink it.  If anything, taking out the dominant doe seems to increase the deer numbers in the immediate area where she was removed, for at least the remainder of the season that year.  I really noticed that last early December, up at my in-laws place in the Adirondacks.  
 

Normally, we go up there for the long Thanksgiving weekend every year.  Last year, we went up a week later, because it was our turn to host my extended family for that dinner at home.  As fate would have it, I ended up punching my buck tag at home that weekend, so I had no deer tag to use up in the Dacks on the next weekend.  
 

I had removed the dominant doe up there during the Early ML week last year.  Never have I seen as much deer activity in early December up there, than I did last year, as I was out chasing bears and grouse with no deer tag.   It was almost like taking out that old boss doe more than a month prior had created a “free for all”, allowing every doe and her sister to move in from the surroundings, filling the void that was created.  
 

That is not just because I was up there a week later than normal (the local deer population at that spot always increases later in the season as the herds move down off the Tug hill plateau, to their wintering “yard” areas). I was there the year prior a week later yet, for the late ML session, and there were less deer around then.  
 

I actually saw the same thing happen here at home in WNY last weekend.  I saw two antlerless deer and two antlered bucks last Saturday.  That is the most deer that I saw on any day that I hunted during the early September season, just (4) days after killing the dominant doe back there.  
 

The two bucks (one of which was a 2.4 year old 8 point) seemed almost oblivious to my presence, whereas the does were extremely skittish, almost as if they were expecting to get the boot by the old bat that usually  “ruled the roost”. 
 

I think most hunters have the mistaken impression that bucks control the territory.  In reality, I think it is the old dominant does that do.  Taking out the lead doe allows for a local competition, drawing in a crowd, until a new leader emerges.  
 

I didn’t kill those two dominant doe to draw in a bunch of deer off the neighbor’s places.  I killed them for one reason only, to put the maximum amount of meat in my freezer.  I have never seen a situation when that wasn’t the best harvest decision.  That’s what I mean by “not overthinking it”.

There is also a “greater good” in taking out the dominant doe in an area like around home, where the local deer population is way above optimum (that’s why they had to start that early September gun season).  Those dominant does pump out the most offspring, so taking them out provides the best reduction in numbers.  I don’t think you are doing yourself, or anyone else, a favor by not targeting the dominant doe in such a spot. 
 

If however, you are in an area that could stand an increase in deer numbers, then laying off of those dominant doe makes more sense.  

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On 9/23/2022 at 9:53 AM, Belo said:

The thing about "nice weather" and deer hunting is that generally the 2 don't go well together. Not that we want rain and wind, but those brisk november mornings are where it's at.

It's kind of funny to see you treat it like a pre-season scouting hunt too. And not in a negative way, because I view turkey season very similar to that for deer. 

Do you think you'll go back out during the regular gun season?

If Cynthia goes out,I will go also to hopefully  drag a Deer out that She Shoots.

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On 9/25/2022 at 12:42 AM, blackbeltbill said:

If Cynthia goes out,I will go also to hopefully  drag a Deer out that She Shoots.

would love if she makes it out. not going to hunt though? any reason?

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