apotvin693

Pharsilia wild life management area.

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Hey everyone.  Im thinking of going to pharsilia for a hunt in the 2014 bow season, wondering what the hunting pressure is like in the area as well as the deer population. also what the specific unit designation is for that area 7m, u, r????.  looking for a good hunt to put some meat in the freezer,  not necessarily a trophy hunt. 

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It's 7M.  I don't know what the hunting pressure is like, but it's in a fairly rural area.  I drive by it on 23 quite regularly and I haven't noticed any increase in traffic since bow season started.  I will say, however, that there are a bunch of deer in the fields that I can see from 23 near it.  Give it a shot if you're fairly local to the area.  

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That area in general has great hunting. Tons of state land around to spread the hunters thin. I have a hunting camp with roughly 450 acres on one end of Morgan hill state forest and we only see a notable amount of hunters during opening gun weekend. Besides that weekend, especially during bow, there is very limited pressure.

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being that it is pretty rural, is a place to stay for a week while I hunt a lot to ask for.  what is the average size buck/doe in that area.  is it pretty risky to leave hunting equipment in the woods for a few months at a time around there like tree stands or a camera and what not.

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To be honest, I can't tell you these answers. You need to go out that and find out. Personally I would think your stuff would be fine left out there but who knows now a days. But there are big deer there it just takes time. Plenty of deer roaming those hills. You just need to go and put time in the woods and you'll find if you like it or not. Personally I wouldn't bow hunt any larger area like that without any scouting done. I'd wait till I can use my rifle.

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probably wont be going until the 2014 bow season so ill take a trip down and do some scouting in early spring.  I thought I heard from somebody that all of southern tier was shotgun and muzzleloader only.  Then I looked at dec website last night and it looks like only certain counties are that way.  Is this true?  Sorry, I don't mean to sound ignorant but I live one state away.  What are there for tree species down there? What is most predominate?  

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a great area to hunt, go in off of route 23 on One eye road, there is 7500 acres of land, lots of mixed hard wood and pine.. take the road to the end and turn into the state land and follow the road around, you will see on the left the old shooting range and a small pond. If you take the walk bridge across the spill way, lots of hard wood and great area for deer and turkey. if you go down the road another 1/2 mile you will come to a T in the road, as you look across you will see several open fields, if you go to the right and then take a sharp left and go maybe 200 yards down and park, walk up into the hard woods on the right and you will find several apple trees. I got a great 8 point there. If you just take a left at the t and dive mabe 300 yards up, you will find on the left another small area that has maybe 10 or more apple trees and the small clearing butts up to a large tract of pines. I got another great buck just sitting in the clearing and he walked out to feed on apples. as for pressure you will not see many other cars during the bow and or small game  (bird hunter) but come gun the first week the roads are like NY city, with lots of hunters from down state . But most will not take a compass and walk in to get away from the herd. they just park and walk in maybe a 100 yards and sit . It sure does pay to scout ahead. if you need a hotel / motel then Norwich is 13 miles away and has a motel called the Norwich Inn  and they get just $30 bucks for a night. there phone is 607 334 9935.

 

 

I hope this helps

Bill


Sweet Old Bill

Sand Dune archers Myrtle beach SC

Gilbertvile archers NY

Senior archers of Oneonta NY

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