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Timney Trigger Installation Question


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I bought a Timney Trigger for my old Remington 788 .308. It was easy to switch out the original trigger with this one until I went to put it into the stock. The instructions mention that some inletting may be required and it looks like that is the case for my situation. The the safety is sitting too low to move from safe to fire.. so my question is what is the best technique to inlet and make this safety function/fit properly? I want to have a solid game plan before I start sanding/chipping away at the stock. No pressure though.. if I mess things up I will just get a replacement stock but it would be nice to just use this one. 

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I would not think there would have to be a whole lot of wood removed, as with most projects the right tools make for a good job. When it comes to inletting dedicated stock inletting tools are by far the best but very expensive and not needed for a small job. Some decent hobby sharp wood carving knives can be had for a small outlay. Another option for small work is a dremel type tool and or small needle files.

I would use a marking pen to outline the area where the wood needs to be removed and start taking off very small amounts of wood working toward the pen border line. Once the wood is gone it is gone forever so it is all about going slow and easy and keep trying the fit until the safety works.

When done a dab of walnut stain on a qtip will blend in the color and a dab of stock finish like true oil will put everything back to pretty much original looks wise.

If you go slow and easy it should be a fairly straight forward job.

Have confidence in yourself and best of luck.

Al

 

Edited by airedale
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3 minutes ago, jperch said:

I have the same rifle, surprised you feel the need to replace the trigger.  They were a steal back in the day, I see them (in excellent condition) on GB for a grand or more.

All Remingtons are climbing in value. Used to buy those 788s for 400 bucks for a nice one. 

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3 minutes ago, jperch said:

I have the same rifle, surprised you feel the need to replace the trigger.  They were a steal back in the day, I see them (in excellent condition) on GB for a grand or more.

I've read that some people had issues with the safety and also when I took the gun apart the trigger assembly was very very dirty... the value in the 788 is the action, the trigger is a part many people upgrade.

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23 minutes ago, ridgerunner88 said:

I've read that some people had issues with the safety and also when I took the gun apart the trigger assembly was very very dirty... the value in the 788 is the action, the trigger is a part many people upgrade.

I have thought about upgrading the plain jane stock.  I forget what I paid for mine, bought it from Beikirchs in Rochester, I think forty years ago.

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7 minutes ago, jperch said:

I have thought about upgrading the plain jane stock.  I forget what I paid for mine, bought it from Beikirchs in Rochester, I think forty years ago.

My brother is refinishing the my stock right now... coating it like 10 times.. we stained it with walnut and he has coated it like 10 times with some concoction.. he calls it a bowling pin finish... should be done here in a week or two.. pretty excited.

We also are gonna add a little picatinny rail and top it off with a nice Leupold VX-3HD 2.5-8 scope and a limbsaver recoil pad... think it will look pretty sharp, its been enjoyable bringing the old girl back to life... ill post pictures when we are done

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55 minutes ago, SpacemanSpiff said:

Bought tons of ammo and probably 5 guns from them. Miss that place. 

Yes, same here.  My first gun, an 870 Wingmaster, came from there was I was 16.  We had a friend named Jack Strong who did some gunsmithing for them.  I don't have a "go to" shop anymore. :(

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Get some prussian blue...it is a machinists " paint", that is applied to one surface, to see where it is making contact with another. Apply it generously to the trigger/safety, and place into stock. Where it hits you need to shave/sand, etc. 

I used it when final fit bedding the flintlock I built last winter, and it was invaluably. Likely, you have a very large margin of error around the trigger and safety....that would be a non -=bedding area of the action. hack alot out, no damage done. 

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