burmjohn

2018 HuntingNY Bow/Archery Harvest Thread

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Doe for the freezer, another heart shot, went about 100 yards. Those slicks tricks are lethal, always a pass thru with those heads. Gonna fill the freezer fast with these big does. 

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Thanks for all the support yesterday huntingny!

Ive been starting to get a little burnt despite not hunting that much relative to previous seasons.

My mother reminded me I can't control the weather on Friday so I made lemonade out of pee on Saturday by hanging a new set (in freezing monsoon conditions) in an annual breeding area but with very little in sign yet.

Ive had this tree on my list a long time so I settup for 2 hours then prepped the trail in and out of the thickets in my lanes with antlerice hot doe and buck (it was pouring so I doused the trail) and made a mock.

Sunday AM went as planned I got in early/quiet/downwind and I set a stink stick of hot doe over the scrape and hung one of buck by my boots in the tree...all was perfect...then I realized I forgot my release at home....ugh

I left all my heavy gear on and my bow in the tree and raced home and back and was set again by 6:57, overheated and under-confident.

Around 7:30 I snapped a pic of my lure lanes and posted it on the live thread it was just legal so I decided to tickle the bag and give one very light grunt in hopes it would explain all the commotion the previous hour.

A few minutes later I catch movement at my 7 right where I expect it, I see main beam around ears.  He is nosing my trail hard but every couple seconds does a quick pause.

I draw when his head is obscured he pops in my first lane (15 yds) on his way to the mock.

I fire seated (my preference) I see it's back a bit he gallops a 180 then stops and slowly walks back into the brush a couple wobbles.

It was raining, the shot exited a little back.  I got down to check the arrow good pass thru but a bit of liver smell.

I waited an hour then found first and second blood then backed out called dog search to be safe and asked for permission on adjacent property and waited til 2:30 (7 hrs) on the liver.

Braylee the dachsund followed the exact trail with no blood (all in the carcass) and I spotted him easily after about 80 yards and 3 minutes on the same trail he walked out on.

140 on the scale and a nice marbled chocolate vanilla swirl typical 8 rack maybe 85-90" net.

Nice 2.5 for the county parcel I'm hunting.

Good hanging weather today as wellIMG_5997.thumb.PNG.3bf5fd6558f6394cc3a0f48637f5087b.PNG

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Edited by OtiscoPaul
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Delicious 1.5 year old doe headed for the freezer...

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"I'm not from New York. I'm a REDNECK from Western New York!!!"

"It's not a passion. It's an obsession!!!" - Mossy Oak

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This doe was pushed into this big tuft of tall grass/bamboo by a six point as I was getting undressed at the truck. I calmly got my bow from the backseat, went around the back and got my release from my pack, walked around the front of the truck and got ti around 20 yards. She was hard quartering away so I shot just in front of her hip and got about 18" of penetration. She went a ways and the blood trail was terrible, her intestines plugged the hole. Sodfather came out and helped me track and it was a tough one between very little blood and the woods being soaked. Also the yellow maple leaves with the bright red splotches were a MENACE. I was glad he could make it and owe him big time. Shes a big girl, pic straight on doesnt show it. I have way too much stuff in the way of my scale but I'd bet shes 120+

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I find a duck's opinion of me is very much influenced by whether or not I have bread

-Mitch Hedberg

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A3849B73-EFE2-4129-A1EE-4BDBBE89FFA2.thumb.png.773bd1333980f3890727f4a1ab572f24.pngGot it done today in 8H after a slower than normal season.  He came right toward my treestand from upwind.  Turned sharply at 15 yards and gave me a perfect quartering away shot.  Double lung with a rage... he ran about 75 yards and I watched him drop.

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My son and I both had deer on the ground 200 yards apart, 10 minutes after getting to our stands on Sunday morning. It was the most amazing thing, we arrived lated, bumped 3 on the way in and didnt even have time to really get settled when the action began and texts started flying!

I shot a doe and he arrowed this this big 8 at 22 yards, nose to the ground hot on the trail of the few we bumped only a few minutes before. I swear it is the fattest heaviest buck I have ever seen, taxidermist is keeping the jaw to age it. His first words were “oh man thats an old deer!”

My son said he was shaking so bad, like never before and thought for sure he would blow it, but pulled it together! I couldnt be more happy for him!

For size reference, he is 6’2” 220...

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Out for an early morning sit prior to work in 3G. Situated at a pinch point in a rock wall overlooking hardwood flats. West wind and about 50 degrees. Hunting from the ground pinched between two trees growing next to a rock wall.

About 10 mins after legal, heard rustling to the east and figured squirrel. Then saw movement, nice bodied young deer. Spike with slight fork on one side. Unfortunately, dead in the wrong spot with the wind.

He made his way to the pinch point and pauses. Licks his nose heavy and worked the wind. I knew he would wind me. Looking dead at me but no clue I was there. He continues to work the wind and then smells me. Tail up and turns, slow run off back where he came from. Stops and looks over his shoulder, then walks 90 degrees parallel to me. Slowly moving, nosing through the leaves and munching on mast.

I wait for him to step behind a tree and draw. He moves forward, completely broadside and I bleat to stop him. About 10+ yards away. Relax, let the arrow go, hear the arrow hit him and pass through.

He kicks and runs about 50 yards, then slow walk off along a ridgeline. Watch him walk off and mark the point of visual loss. Uggh, I am thinking miss, liver or non-fatal hit.

Gave it 30 minutes before I looked for arrow. Found the arrow embedded in a rotted blow down. Heavy dark blood. Uggh, liver shot.

On the fence on what to do. Let him sit and search later or push him. I go back to point of impact. No hair visible, track is clear but no blood. Uggh again.

Decide to leave him be but walk along a ridge that I can glass back where I lost him. Sit down on the ridge and hit the binos. Spot white belly. Dead deer. Go back to the point of impact and trace his trail. Not a spot of blood visible.

Spike is stone dead when I get there. Very little blood outside his body or in bed. Body cavity was filled with blood when I field dressed him. Liver was shredded.

In hindsight three mistakes. I'd love to tell you the deer turned on the shot and that's why I hit back, but I'd be lying. First, mistake was target panic, I aimed for deer and not a spot. Second, I pulled the shot and had poor follow through. Third, I didn't follow the arrow and confirm point of impact. I am fortunate and grateful for having taken and found the deer quickly. It was my first recurve kill and I have plenty to learn.

Deer is hanging, cavity packed with ice and ready for skinning quartering tonight. Not a p&y but a trophy to me and will provide good food for the family.

Many thanks to Moog for giving me advice on getting started with the recurve. I probably will bring out the crossbow to fill doe tags, but bring the recurve back out for regular season. cfc7682ed41ba9b3b671f5064b521bd4.jpg

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Finally got a buck down today! Not the biggest bruiser in the woods but with the bow season winding down I decided to take him. He came into the right of me and continued up the hill. I grunted at him twice and he turned and came to 13 yards of the treestand. When I shot he acted like I didn’t even hit him and just walked off. Straight down the trail. I waited about 1 1/2 hours then went to check the arrow. It looked good so I started blood trailing. After about 50 yards it looked like someone poured red paint down the trail. He went 142 yards and piled up.


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Killed mine Friday morning......6pt at about 10 yards.  The shot angle was steep and he was quartering towards me.  Hit the back of either one or both lungs and down through all kinds of things.  At the shot he took a couple bounds then started walking slowly away and waging his tail in that "odd" way.  I watched him for probably 2 minutes before he disappeared in the goldenrod.  I figured I'd give him at least two hours and then take a walk.  I went back to my buddies and had a cup of coffee and some toast.  At the 2 1/2 hour mark I figured I better get moving, it had started to snow real lightly.  I went down into the basement to get dressed, my buddy came down and we ended up BS'ing for 20 minutes or so.  I climbed the stairs and opened the Bilco door to a BLIZZARD.  SOB........

I quickly drove over and got into the woods were I last saw him.  (back up for a second; when I was still in the stand after shooting him I could see all kinds of blood where he was walking with the binos so I knew he was leaking good) I got on the blood fast but it was covered in 2-3" of snow and it was coming down harder and harder.   Making it more difficult was the way it was piling up on the branches, brush and ME.  Sometimes the only way to see the blood was after walking a likely trail then going back and seeing it in my boot tracks.  I'd catch some blood on the goldenrod and other brush too after I got into a second stand of incredibly thick pines. 

I was soaked, beat up and getting dejected with all the snow.  It was getting worse.....

I took the trail to a power line right of way and for the life of me couldn't tell if he stayed in the pines, crossed the ROW, back tracked, zigged or zagged.  From the shot he'd gone about 150 yards and never bedded that I could see. 

I quit.....

The day before I'd shot a coyote and couldn't find it.  Between the 'yote and this buck I was beating myself up pretty good.  I went back to my buddies, took my soaking wet clothes of, hung the bow up to dry out and had some lunch.  I laid down for 15 minutes and couldn't sleep.  I had brought two rifles with me and wanted to confirm zero so I did. 

It was about 3:00 now and the snow had changed to rain.  I noticed that much of the snow on the brush around camp had either blown off or was dropping due to the (slightly) warmer temps and rain making me think I better get my ass back over for another look.  I quickly swapped out some clothes and headed over.  Within minutes of getting there I was at the spot I "lost" blood.  I went to the north just 15' past my mostly gone boot tracks from earlier and there he was, deader than a door nail.  I assume he was covered in snow at the time and so was all the surrounding brush making him darn near impossible to see.  I quickly dressed him of in the failing light and headed back to camp for my buddy the Honda Foreman.  

I honestly can't remember the last time I was so soaking wet, from the waist down I was drenched from the rain and wet snow.  Sorry the pic suck as I was not in the mood to snap any hero shots in the sow hole where I gutted him.  The barn was drier.......

My face looks like I'm having a stroke, I think it was just 'cause I had snot pouring out of my beak.

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Persistence paid off and I was thrilled with the outcome.

 

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Please support the hunting of Mourning Dove In New York State.  For information, visit nydovehunting.weebly.com/

 

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Got some better pictures of my buck.

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After two years of chasing him I finally got to stick an arrow in him at 40 yards. He came out into the field nose to the ground headed for the lone doe feeding in the field. He closed the distance fast and I had to scramble to get ready. He stopped at 40 yards to sniff the doe and when he did I drew back, settled the pin and let it rip. He ran about 50 yards and piled up.

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One extremely windy day (~40mph gusts), I saw the #2 biggest buck that I had on trail cam about 200 yards away walking in my direction. At 80 yards, he veered off the path and took another route. I grunted as loud as I could to get his attention, but no luck. The wind was also blowing away from the buck, so he couldn’t smell the doe in estrus scent either.

I’ve considered getting a decoy for years, but never did it. This made me determined to get a decoy for next year! But, WHY wait until next year? The bucks were just starting to look for does. Especially on windy days, like we’ve had so many of this year, if they can’t hear or smell the “does”, then giving them a visual would help. So, I ran out that day and purchased a buck decoy, that without the antlers, would pass for a doe. I was concerned about any plastic odor, so I put the decoy in my truck, and ran my Scent Crusher Ozone Go Vehicle Air Cleaner and also later sprayed it down with scent killer spray. I started using it that same evening and every buck that saw the decoy, came right into it! I had 8 different bucks, of all sizes, come to it during 5 different hunts. Some would leave for a while and later swing back by the decoy again up to 4 times! I even had a buck bed down 30 yards from the decoy. It was working like a charm!

On this particular hunt, I saw a buck step out of the thicket ~80 yards away. As soon as he spotted the doe decoy, he came in without any hesitation, like he was on a string! I could see that he wasn’t as big of a buck as I was hoping for, but he was a big ass 6pt and I would be happy with him! When he got to 25 yards and directly broadside, I took my shot. I saw that it was a good hit and he bolted. I heard him crash just a few yards into the woods. He only made it 20 yards from the shot, before tipping over.

First buck with the new Hoyt!

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This is the exit hole.

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"It's nice to be important, but it's more important to be nice." - Wease

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Hi all. New to the forum and just recently came across this great site and joined. 

Last Thursday afternoon  I was fortunate enough to shoot my biggest buck.

I’m down in southern tier hunting in orange and rockland counties. Took this guy in 3m over in warwick on property I have hunted for years with my brother in law. 

Had been a slow early season but something told me to wrap up work early last thurs and get in the woods. I get to the property around 2:15pm gear up. I grab a water bottle from my passenger seat and turn around to 3 does that stalked up behind me and were literally 10 feet away from my trunk staring at me and grazing. They wander off after checking me out for a few minutes without a care. 

On my way to my stand it’s pretty swampy from all the rains we’ve had. I kick up a small 6 as I take my time going in. Sprayed some estrus scent as I get to my stand. Finally get all settled in and realize what an idiot I am as I left my release in the car! I move as quietly and quickly as I can back to my car and grab my release. By time I get back to my stand I’m sweating. Aggravated with myself. Within 5 mins I hear something in the stream behind me. It’s a doe and she swims across and pops out to my right. After grazing for several minutes she bolts into the field in front of me that has high grass and thickets. I scan to my right to see what may have startled her and see the sun hitting something behind some small trees. I took a double take when I realized how big this buck was. He followed the doe into the field but I had no shot. As I watched and gave some grunts he kept his distance. At that point 3 more bucks came in and left chasing a couple other does. But this guy and a smaller buck stayed in the field. I watched him rub up a tree and hang out in the field for 30 mins. I tried bleats and more grunts and he would stop and,listen but not come close. Finally I gave a few more aggressive grunts and he lowered his head and went into the heavy brush straight in front of me. I got ready and he stepped out into the clearing at 25 yds and I hit him good.

He took off back across the field and disappeared out of sight. But I was confident I hit him good. After half hour I got down and found my arrow. Had a very good blood trail but I waited some more before following it and finding him about 60 yds across the field. I was hunting by myself so dragging and getting him into my trunk was a hell of an effort. But it was the most amazing hunt of  my life and I am so grateful! 

190 lbs 8 pts

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Warrior15fl
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Took this doe on Wednesday, 11.14.18. There was a dusting of snow. Been getting trail cam shots of a tanker and I held out for him as he was running and trailing does. But alas, only a six-point yearling was following her, so I with time running out, I let the arrow fly at her at 10:30 am. A bit far back, liver hit. Got on the easy track in the snow. Bumped her from her first bed at about 75 yards. Backed out. Gave her three hours. Came back and found her next to an old farm implement in the thick stuff...after another 75 yards. She had bedded and gotten up twice more. She bedded in honey suckle and multiflora rose. Easy steady trail. Hand pruners were handy cutting through the rose stems. The six-point presented a better shot than she did, but still hoping for a shot at the big guy. But the snow moved in. But I have a buck tag for muzzleloader/bow, and some venison in the freezer. 

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Doe at the end of the trail as I found her. .JPG

Edited by Buckstopshere
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On 11/3/2018 at 10:07 PM, johnplav said:

A3849B73-EFE2-4129-A1EE-4BDBBE89FFA2.thumb.png.773bd1333980f3890727f4a1ab572f24.pngGot it done today in 8H after a slower than normal season.  He came right toward my treestand from upwind.  Turned sharply at 15 yards and gave me a perfect quartering away shot.  Double lung with a rage... he ran about 75 yards and I watched him drop.

Update on this buck...  Good Luck tomorrow!   

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Edited by johnplav
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So on the final morning of a pretty miserable bow season this deer was slipping by me about 60 yards out. I grunted and he turned around and came in to 19 yards, guartering to but not severely. He piled up in just under 80 yards. Being unsure of the hit I have him three hours. Also Sodfather was hunting and I didn’t want to screw him up. For as useless as the grunt tube can sometimes seem it absolutely got me this buck1b134e277498d6e20d057bff7103178f.jpg37c8db15ecce6a635a9f86b3973887f3.jpg9c7a28fc68ed390572b102f2afdeb97f.jpga1d27200a368a8e41e5ab145132cadeb.png75b35b2b8ac0452b4560b64302ad5b21.png You could say I was pretty happy!


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I find a duck's opinion of me is very much influenced by whether or not I have bread

-Mitch Hedberg

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