rachunter

Does you survival gear work??

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I have read- Wilderness First Aid once. Because of this Thread, I am going to go through it once again. Some of the pictures in this book are pretty graffic.

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Great thread!  How did I miss this? 

I'm an avid hiker and take the warning, "Be prepared to spend a night in the woods" seriously.  You can plan so much, but it's that 1% that might get you!  Could be a medical event, a bad step that leads to fall and serious injury or simply a bad navigation decision.  Now what?

Keep your head and think through your options.  Is self-rescue or hunkering down the best choice?  Make a game plan and set goals.  The tools you have on-hand and/or skill set that allows you to craft them will weigh heavily into your chances of success.

Here's what I always take in my pack, whether it's a day hike or overnight:

Shelter: Top priority right here.  I carry a basic space blanket, duct tape, safety pins, paracord and SOL bivy.  Total weight is less than a pound.  My goal would be to build a simple lean-to fortified with evergreen branches and leaves to keep me dry and off the ground. 

Water: I have 3 to 5 options on every hike.  Primarily, I use my own hack of a Sawyer mini filter and a Platypus 2L Big Zip bag.  Simply scoop the bag into a stream and let gravity do the work.  This fills my 1L nalgene and 1L Platypus soft bottles at a rate of 2 minutes/L.  My backup method is carrying a bottle of iodine tablets.  These weigh nothing and there's no reason not to have them.  Next, there is the morning dew or rain water that can be collected, as needed.  Lastly, I'll drink directly from the source and risk the beaver fever if desperate enough.  It can stave off dehydration before the ill effects kick in days later.  In the winter, I always bring a JetBoil so it's easy enough to boil snow or water.  Only once have I needed to go to option #2 (iodine tablets) because a piece of downfall had unknowingly ripped open my outter pack mesh pouch and the filter fell out.

Fire: Three methods at all times.  1. Bic lighter.  2. Storm proof matches in a waterproof container.  3. Ferro rod and steel.  In addition, I always bring a candle, Wet Fire tablets and a baggie of dryer lint and vaseline.  Birch bark is an excellent tinder that can be found almost anywhere in the ADK's.  The candle and Wet Fire are most useful with wet wood; you need to get a constant flame on your tinder and larger pieces to dry them out enough to get the fire going.  I never thought of bringing a flammable liquid, but tiki torch oil works very well because of it's slower burn rate.

Food:  I always pack extra so this is never a concern.  Clif bars and jerky are my favorites along with peanut M&M's.  You can live 3 weeks without any food so I'm sure that I could forage enough berries, worms and grubs to survive in a true worst-case scenario.

First aid:  I pack very little, actually.  Basic band-aids and gauzes, some duct tape wrapped around a mini Sharpie, hydrocolloid bandages and silicone toe sleeves for blisters, butterfly bandages, Neosporin, some single-use alcohol wipes, Aleve and chewable benadryl.  My worst "injuries" have been blisters, bug bites and some stings from one a**hole ground wasp.

Misc: Headlamp with extra lithium batteries (since I typically hike at night), a Surefire E2D LED with extra batteries, spare headlamp, bandana, map & compass, spare boot laces, bug spray, sun screen, baby wipes, spare Smartwool socks, my Arc'teryx shell, seasonal layers and a multi-tool. 

This might sound like a lot of stuff, especially for day hikes, but it's really not.  My typical hike pack is an 18L Osprey Talon that weighs 10-15 lbs with everything.  I'll lay it all out and take a pic another time.  

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The Birch tree has been written about in this Thread alot. I remember reading that the inner Bark of the Birch-- the Cambium can be ate Raw and has saved lives.    I took a horrible Fall around 1999 while walking over a large flat Rock. It moved and , I came down with my Left Ulna on another big Rock. The Ulna is the smaller bone- in your Forearm on the Pinky side. I actually felt the Ulna Bend. Why it did not break, I don't know. I grew up drinking plenty of Milk though. But, I digress. That easily could have been the back of my head on that big Rock. I am very careful to this day while hiking each weekend after what happened back then. The Ulna snaps alot in Weightlifting and powerlifting in the Bench with too many competitors. Hint-- don't watch on Utube-- 800lb broken arm bench press.  I was in pain for a week-- but thankfully my arm was not Broken.

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2 hours ago, b3h said:

Anyone use the SPOT device?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I bought a Garmin Inreach Explorer+, which has satellite gps tracking (others can see where you are using a webpage) and satellite text messaging capability, but I haven't used it yet. If/when I go out alone on an overnighter hike on public land, it will be with me.

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Good thread! Some really good info here!

 

Some of you guys carry a ton of stuff makes me wonder how far in you’re really going if you’re going to be toting all that stuff?

 

My survival equipment is very small and light. From years of doing it something’s have been added and and taken out over the years but has stayed constant for about 5 years now. Everything I carry fits in a very small wool fanny pack.

 

8x9’ piece of tyvec ironed and vacuum sealed in a package the size of a sandwich bag and thinner than a box of matches.

 

Small Corona folding saw “this is more for processing deer for the pack out but is dual purpose in a survival situation”

 

Life straw

 

550 cord 10ft with inner strands 30ish’ with inner strands removed.

 

Lighter x2

 

Tinder, can’t remember the name of the company but they come in a pack the size of a hard candy wrapper and have a fiber material that lights easy and stays burning for a bit. I have 2 of them in my pack

 

2 large construction trash bags folded and vacuum sealed “smaller and a sandwich baggie and thinner than a book of matches”

 

1 small single aaa led flashlight.

 

2 1ft sq pieces of aluminum foil for boiling water/cooking.

 

I’m sure I’m forgetting stuff but that’s about it. I feel 100% confident that I could survive way longer than I would want to with what I carry into the woods when I hunt the ADK’s.

 

I haven’t been on in a while but how is there 130 posts on survival and stormy hasn’t passed on all of his wisdom?

 

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

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4 hours ago, old man river said:

A good way to keep your feet dry in emergency conditions is to simply double up a Walmart plastic bag over your socks before putting on your footwear that may be drenched already.

I grew up poor and my only pair of winter boots had plastic bags as liners so the snow and slush wouldn't seep through the multiple holes in the soles. Plastic bags were a lot thicker then so you could get a full season out of two.

Haven't thought about those in years.

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23 minutes ago, left field said:

I grew up poor and my only pair of winter boots had plastic bags as liners so the snow and slush wouldn't seep through the multiple holes in the soles. Plastic bags were a lot thicker then so you could get a full season out of two.

Haven't thought about those in years.

We used bread bags .

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You could afford bread? Lucky!

When I was a kid, white bread was 25 cents a loaf or five for a dollar. It was a big day when my mother showed up with five loaves.

Anyway, back to the program. 

Most people who get lost and perish do so from exposure and that's usually because they're not dressed for the weather. Cotton kills, wet cotton kills quicker.

 

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21 minutes ago, left field said:

You could afford bread? Lucky!

When I was a kid, white bread was 25 cents a loaf or five for a dollar. It was a big day when my mother showed up with five loaves.

Anyway, back to the program. 

Most people who get lost and perish do so from exposure and that's usually because they're not dressed for the weather. Cotton kills, wet cotton kills quicker.

 

whoa now that came from left field

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8 hours ago, goosifer said:

I bought a Garmin Inreach Explorer+, which has satellite gps tracking (others can see where you are using a webpage) and satellite text messaging capability, but I haven't used it yet. If/when I go out alone on an overnighter hike on public land, it will be with me.

Did you have to pay for a yearly subscription? The spot is $200 a year.I'm thinking of getting it when I retire right now I can't justify that for the few days.

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1 hour ago, rachunter said:

Did you have to pay for a yearly subscription? The spot is $200 a year.I'm thinking of getting it when I retire right now I can't justify that for the few days.

No. Can do 30 days at a time, or annually. See https://explore.garmin.com/en-CA/inreach/ towards the bottom of the page. Looks like as low as$20 for 30 days of basic coverage.

From the website:

  • Monthly Freedom plans are ideal for your next adventure or seasonal use, requiring only a 30-day commitment with the ability to suspend service when you don’t need it.
  • Annual contract plans a
  • re great for year-round use, with lower monthly cost and peace of mind that your inReach device is always ready to use.
  • Thanks 1

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not sure if it's been mentioned yet, but another good, but can be expensive idea is to buy items with dual uses. For example, I have a large gerber knife that could be a small machete but also filet a fish. It wouldn't be ideal for either, but saves from carrying both. Also on the knife is a built in compass, bottle/can opener and there's a a removable flint fire starter in the handle. I have backup for some of these things as well, but when you're really talking about day trip survival and not "pack the kids up and drive" type survival, you'll be regretting the extra weight quickly. Lots of food prep equipment can be handled this way too with things like multi-tool style cutlery and filtering straws that can be reused over and over.

also not sure if i saw this, but I keep 2 items that are battery powered with hand crank backups. A weather/fm/am radio that i keep charged, but also can charge via solar and hand crank. It auto-tunes to emergency channels. And a similar style hand crank flashlight. I of course have a nice led battery flashlight, but the hand crank is a solid option. As a type this, I should check to see if i can find a handcrank battery charger for rechargeable double A's. That might be even more efficient.

Edited by Belo
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"Ethical behavior is doing the right thing when no one else is watching, even when the wrong thing is legal"

-Aldo Leopold 

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18 minutes ago, left field said:

Maybe all we need is this?

image.png.4e389cd88d0f549d4752fdcb308d246d.png

i see tapatalk is missing, so that's a hard pass

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"Ethical behavior is doing the right thing when no one else is watching, even when the wrong thing is legal"

-Aldo Leopold 

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15 hours ago, left field said:

You could afford bread? Lucky!

When I was a kid, white bread was 25 cents a loaf or five for a dollar. It was a big day when my mother showed up with five loaves.

Anyway, back to the program. 

Most people who get lost and perish do so from exposure and that's usually because they're not dressed for the weather. Cotton kills, wet cotton kills quicker.

 

Most of the SAR reports that I've read tell of people not prepared for the weather near the summits.  A 70⁰ day at the trailhead is all fine and dandy, but the weather can turn nasty in a hurry at 4000'+.  Mt. Washington in particular can be especially brutal.  The lack of proper gear for hiking in freezing temps, rain, snow and wind chills has killed people.  

Just last month an 80 year old man nearly died on Mt. Washington from exposure.  He lacked the proper gear for hiking at the higher elevations and may be sent the bill for the rescue effort.   https://www.pressherald.com/2019/06/18/hiker-rescued-from-mt-washington-may-have-to-foot-the-bill/

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22 hours ago, Buckmaster7600 said:

 

I haven’t been on in a while but how is there 130 posts on survival and stormy hasn’t passed on all of his wisdom?

 

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

He tried, he failed, miserably I may add.

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What I am carrying on that trip to the ADK's is still very light weight. Like I said, it may seem like a lot, but it really isn't. For me it's all about peace of mind. I won't be just stopping by a trail head to take a pic, there are no trail heads were I'm headed. I will most likely be strolling about 5-7 miles out per hunt on that trip. That may not be as much as some can do, but that's my goal with a back that after 5 miles is screaming in pain, but I want to push it, so I am being prepared if my back gives out and I can't walk back.

 

I again want to mention relying solely on gear that needs batteries or even solar power isn't a good idea. But, I digress, I can explain why this is, but I can't understand it for you.

 

I prefer carabiners to secure a tarp shelter, mainly because they can serve multiple proposes.

 

 

It takes time to develop a kit that works for you in this type of situation, trial and error, this was a great piece of gear, this sucked, that was great, that sucked.....

 

Set up your gear for where you hunt/hike and the terrain.

 

Sorry, again, I am going to say this, don't just read books, get and practice those skills. I know, "broken record", but ya know what, this is one broken record that might save your live.

 

 

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19 minutes ago, DirtTime said:

He tried, he failed, miserably I may add.

My new hobby knife making  :) looks like I don't  know nothing about that either right rob .

 

 

20190621_232331.jpg

20190621_231700.jpg

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What I am carrying on that trip to the ADK's is still very light weight. Like I said, it may seem like a lot, but it really isn't. For me it's all about peace of mind. I won't be just stopping by a trail head to take a pic, there are no trail heads were I'm headed. I will most likely be strolling about 5-7 miles out per hunt on that trip. That may not be as much as some can do, but that's my goal with a back that after 5 miles is screaming in pain, but I want to push it, so I am being prepared if my back gives out and I can't walk back.

 

I again want to mention relying solely on gear that needs batteries or even solar power isn't a good idea. But, I digress, I can explain why this is, but I can't understand it for you.

 

I prefer carabiners to secure a tarp shelter, mainly because they can serve multiple proposes.

 

 

It takes time to develop a kit that works for you in this type of situation, trial and error, this was a great piece of gear, this sucked, that was great, that sucked.....

 

Set up your gear for where you hunt/hike and the terrain.

 

Sorry, again, I am going to say this, don't just read books, get and practice those skills. I know, "broken record", but ya know what, this is one broken record that might save your live.

 

 

If you’re going in that far with a bad back what’s your plan for getting a deer out if you get one?

 

Most anyone can hike that far but getting a deer out from that far in is a completely different story!

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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21 hours ago, goosifer said:

No. Can do 30 days at a time, or annually. See https://explore.garmin.com/en-CA/inreach/ towards the bottom of the page. Looks like as low as$20 for 30 days of basic coverage.

From the website:

  • Monthly Freedom plans are ideal for your next adventure or seasonal use, requiring only a 30-day commitment with the ability to suspend service when you don’t need it.
  • Annual contract plans a
  • re great for year-round use, with lower monthly cost and peace of mind that your inReach device is always ready to use.

Thanks i'm going to do a little more research,but it's something i'd like to have. Does the explorer have the birdseye like the gpsmap 66i? I'd love to have that feature on my gps 

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I'm heading up to my house this afternoon.Going to give my gear a workout on the safety of my property.

Thanks for all the input good stuff  I hope it gets everyone to pull out there gear and test it.

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