rachunter

Does you survival gear work??

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22 hours ago, Northcountryman said:

That Inreach Explorer thing sounds pretty good to me , will it work anywhere  ? 

 In general, as long as you have a clear view of the sky, it can communicate with the satellite network. In certain parts of the globe, there may not be satellite coverage, like by the North pole.

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So today I learned that I need a solution for carrying a pooped 91 lb Golden Retriever down a mountain. :blink:

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Most often I do not go past where I feel I can get out in a reasonable time after dark.   That said I have been stuck in the dark more often then I care to mention.  If I do end up staying overnight I have enough fire proof matches, 5 small boxes, 1 mini bic, 1 disposable adjustable, 1 mini torch plus a small packet of fire starter to have a fire.  Other must have implements that go into my hunting day pack for the Adirondacks:  Most of this must be in a sealed zip-lock bag or container:  TP!, Lanyard with GPS and glow in the dark compass, feral rod, first aid kit must be water proof!, 3 flashlights just because, drag rope, 2 way radio (Now that and GPS is one unit but I still like the older ones display so I still use it.), emergency blanket.  Batteries for GPS with at least one flashlight having same batteries.  (Others are lithium.)  I usually bring a fat sandwich, energy bar and or bag of trail mix along with 3 drinks, water, soda and Gatorade.  Water is first to go by 10 am and soda is next at 11-12 ish I often don't get to the Gatorade unless covering some good ground.  I like to have 2 knives, one small one and another spare of some type, otherwise I sometimes just bring one good folding knife.  Hot seat is attached to day pack.   

The Pic below shows a lightened day pack when I was able to get a brute of an 8 pointer in 2010.  From left to right, drag strap with water proof lithium battery holder on top, 2 flashlights above, left is gutting gloves and hand warmers, top is GPS with glow in the dark compass and deer can calls, Tupperware for sandwich, extra bullets, bloody knife, middle is knife sheath, pen, above is lighter not sure what is behind it, gutting gloves, trail mix, extra batteries and radio, day pack is in the box on left side.  Other stuff I bring when really cold, rain/snow or high wind is expected.  Large sweat pants and parker along with waterproof rain gear in camo, gloves and socks.  I usually like to have an extra compass and knife and if I know I will be in deep late an extra flashlight and head strap for it. 

Most important thing to do in a survival situation is not to panic or make rash decisions.  Mother nature can be amazing and beautiful but also cold and cruel when slapped with the reality of survival. 

 

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Edited by NFA-ADK
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On 7/12/2019 at 9:52 PM, Buckmaster7600 said:

If you’re going in that far with a bad back what’s your plan for getting a deer out if you get one?

 

Most anyone can hike that far but getting a deer out from that far in is a completely different story!

 

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Hiking that far doesn't always mean you are going to be 7 miles deep. You can walk as far as I mentioned and really never be more then a mile from where you parked.

Quartering the deer will take a lot of weight as the bones and pelt make up for much of the weight on deer.

 

Have a plan in my head, but that plan really has nothing to do with if your gear works.

Edited by DirtTime
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I didn’t feel comfortable trying to light a fire in the woods. It’s to dry and I don’t want to take a chance. I found some punk wood this morning and decided to give it a shot in my fire pit. I tried the punk wood with the ferro rod. It seemed to want to light,but after a few minutes I added a Vaseline cotton ball one spark and fire. Was lite. I also pulled a piece of rope apart and tried that it took a few shots but I got it going. I’m going to grind up some punk wood and vacuum seal it.
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Hiking that far doesn't always mean you are going to be 7 miles deep. You can walk as far as I mentioned and really never be more then a mile from where you parked.
Quartering the deer will take a lot of weight as the bones and pelt make up for much of the weight on deer.
 
Have a plan in my head, but that plan really has nothing to do with if your gear works.

You’ll be hoping your gear works when you’re standing next to a buck a mile from your truck.

Having packed out a handful of adk bucks I can tell you it still sucks. Unless you’re going to carry a frame pack all day or walk back to camp/your truck to get a frame pack carrying meat and horns out of the woods isn’t much fun. If possible I would much rather drag but sometimes it’s just not possible.


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Was reading the latest issue of Fur, Fish & Game and a fellow gave instructions on how to get a fire going in rainy conditions using a small 9 volt battery and fine steel wool. Roll the steel wool into a fine rope and touch both ends to the 9 volt battery terminals and it will glow red and is hot enough to set dry tinder on fire.

I just happened to have those items readily available and just gave it a try and sure enough the steel wool glowed red hot and would surely catch on dry fine tinder. Gloves are a good idea when doing this as you can get a burn. 

Just another possible option to start a fire.

Al

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Serious Dogs For Serious Work

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Right!! The ol 9 volt Battery. A wire wrapped around the positive and Negative and then touched over tinder.A Magnifying Glass that often comes folded into a Whistle will work also. I prefer any method that requires the least amount of practice. I have added to my own knowledge by reading the replys of the many members who have posted. As a Lifelong Hiker, I am trying to learn something more with each Hike.

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