rachunter

Does you survival gear work??

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Tyvek is a good idea. I know some people use it for tent footprints.

Is this minimal survival or camping? Trying to put wrapping yourself in tyvek after a hot meal with a pot together.

If survival, you may not have a pot.

If camping, a hammock may be a better idea - light, cheap and easy to put up. 

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On 6/29/2019 at 6:47 PM, rachunter said:

 

I read a thread on another site that questioned if you knew what worked and what didn’t in your survival pack. So today I went through my stuff(I’m still adding)and decided to start with the fire starting gear. Which consisted of two bic lighters(no need to test) two ferro rods a magnesium stick and piece of hacksaw blade a lens from an old scope and uco stormproof matches. Cotton balls smeared with Vaseline vacuum sealed in a bag.

The ferro rods where a coghlan’s which came apart and a no name I picked up at a hunting show. Both throw good sparks with the hacksaw blade and my buck 102 and a cheap Chinese life one of my brothers gave me. I was surprised that the kabar mariner knife didn’t work. The lens was a Waste if time. I sat there trying all kinds of kindle nothing lit. The matches worked great. I even dipped one in water and it relit. So after today I think I’m set with fire starting. I might try a magnifier.

As far a water purification I know my sawyer works because I use it all the time. Whistle and mirror are good. Extra compass. 550 cord.

It’s to hot to try the space blankets right now.

I know I’m missing a bunch of gear,but I never had to carry a survival pack hunting on Long Island. Now I’m up in the ADK’s I won’t go in without one.

So what’s in you pack and does it work??? Let’s hear and see it.

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Excellent thread starter, @rachunter, on a topic that is very near and dear to my heart. I have been studying survival/bushcraft/primitive methods for the past 18 months, on my own and with a class I go to twice a month. I have purchased a lot of gear, but have not yet field tested all of it. As well, a lot of the gear I've purchased can be considered camping gear instead of survival gear. I don't have my hunting kit put together for this coming hunting season yet, so I can't directly respond to your post, but I can contribute these thoughts:

If you have a ferro rod, make sure your knife/metal striker works with it. It needs to be high carbon steel with a 90 degree edge. Some stainless steel knives will not generate a spark.

In addition to testing your gear, make sure you know how to use it. In this regard, the emergency blankets come to mind.

You should be prepared to survive in the woods for 72 hours, under bad weather conditions, if need be. In this regard, remember to cover the ten C's: (These are the 10 I learned; it appears Canterbury changed some of them)

Cutting tool (A knife, preferably a non-folding, full tang, drop point knife)
Cumbustion (2 or 3 methods to make fire, like a lighter, strike anywhere matches, and a ferro rod plus some tinder like vaseline-covered cotton balls)
Cover (The clothes you are wearing, extra hat, scarf and socks, emergency blanket and a small tarp)
Container (single wall stainless steel water bottle that you can boil water in)
Cordage (A couple hanks of 550 paracord)
Communications (most likely your cell phone and an external battery pack, and a loud whistle and orange bandana for signaling)
Compass (and a paper map of where you are hunting)
Comfort (emergency bivvy sleeping bag, contractor garbage bags)
Chow (a liter of water and some food like granola bars, chocolate, instant coffee, ramen noodles)
Candle (headlamp, flashlight and tea candle)

Also, a first aid kit and a repair kit (duct tape, heavy duty needle, heavy thread, super glue)

Obviously, you need to tailor your gear to where you are hunting. In your backyard in early fall vs. in the ADK's in early winter.

This topic is so broad to me, it's hard for me to give a concise response. Sorry if I went beyond the scope of the thread.

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5 hours ago, dbHunterNY said:

i've never done it but i know a lot of people that have made waterproof matches.  i think a fresh lighter and a 35mm photofilm (do they make those still?) cansister full of vaseline loaded cotton balls works great. with a fire it's important to first gather wood for it. then when you think you have enough get more to have double what you've got. pine pitch and shavings from a nice young (thin barked) green tree is great for the center of your kindling pile. pine is everywhere here in NY, especially the dacks.

By green tree, I assume you mean an evergreen like pine, spruce, etc.? Otherwise, aside from birch bark, you'd want dry, dead wood for kindling.

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Your best piece of survival gear sits on your shoulders......

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5 hours ago, DirtTime said:

WTF!? You don't get out much do you? That container breaks and your gear is ruined, and if it's in a pocket close to the shin you just became a walking match and probably have a chemical burn. That's not survival, that's glamping.

Apparently you are not aware that there are small packable liquid fuel containers constructed out of metal that are made to be carried on one's person safely. Many use them to carry fuel for those small back pack camp stoves. I have a couple that I use for my for my ATV, no worry about them breaking and me catching on fire.

2019-07-02_211010.png

Edited by airedale
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9 minutes ago, airedale said:

Apparently you are not aware that there are small packable liquid fuel containers constructed out of metal that are made to be carried on one's person safely. Many use them to carry fuel for those small back pack camp stoves. I have a couple that I use for my for my ATV, no worry about them breaking and me catching on fire.

2019-07-02_211010.png

I gas the guy never spilled gas fueling a car or lawnmower before the stuff does not ignite with out a flame or spark .

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17 minutes ago, airedale said:

Apparently you are not aware that there are small packable liquid fuel containers constructed out of metal that are made to be carried on one's person safely. Many use them to carry fuel for those small back pack camp stoves. I have a couple that I use for my for my ATV, no worry about them breaking and me catching on fire.

2019-07-02_211010.png

When a survival equipment list comes to mind compact and light is my thought, this wouldn't even make my backpacking list unless at extreme altitude or temperature (when a canister stove starts to have issues).

I'd have room to spare inside that with all of a kit.

Whos gonna carry that full of fuel even in the ADK's unless actually using it for primary fuel source?

Edited by Dinsdale
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23 minutes ago, Dinsdale said:

Whos gonna carry that full of fuel even in the ADK's unless actually using it for primary fuel source?

I would guess someone that wants to safely carry along some liquid fuel for whatever their reason, those containers are made in several sizes and there are some that are pretty small and easily carried. The folks that pack and use those small foldable alcohol stoves would find them to be useful I think,

A person can carry the gear want they want as far as I am concerned, the point I was making is there are safe ways to carry liquid fuel if one desires to do so.

2019-07-02_214641.png

Edited by airedale

Serious Dogs For Serious Work

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2 minutes ago, airedale said:

I would guess someone that wants to carry along some liquid fuel for whatever their reason, those containers are made in several sizes and there are some that are pretty small and easily carried.

I seen a guy carrying a 3x5 plastic folding table by Slant Rock on the way to spend the night and go over Haystack in the ADKs a few years ago. 

So I guess he'd pick this for a survival situation too.

Ya got me there.

Way better ways to make fire in an emergency situation....but plenty of stupid out there that wants to carry a liquid I guess. (I'm not talking about camping, to me that's not the thread title)

That bottle full weighs over a pound. I know I have 2 and have had them full; more like over 17 ounces...its like carrying 2 bricks. I hate the stove and them bottles.

 

The dude with the table didn't look all that happy either come to think of it. LOL

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This light weight container would be the ticket for the fellow that wants to safely carry fuel to start a fire, a little tinder, some lighter fluid and your Zippo lighter no problem.:yes:

Al

71HUlwnD2IL._SL1500_.jpg

Edited by airedale
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They have containers the size of a medicine bottle made for flammable fluids if you look around  that's all you need . 

Or just buy the smallest size lighter fluid you can find  they come in smaller sizes then this .

20190702_221602.jpg

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8 hours ago, left field said:

.

Is this minimal survival or camping? Trying to put wrapping yourself in tyvek after a hot meal with a pot together.

If survival, you may not have a pot.

 

This is strictly a pack in case I get lost or injured and have to spend the night or three.

I have a little pot it's not in the picture because I was testing it out and left it up at my house.

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8 hours ago, goosifer said:

Excellent thread starter, @rachunter, on a topic that is very near and dear to my heart. I have been studying survival/bushcraft/primitive methods for the past 18 months, on my own and with a class I go to twice a month. I have purchased a lot of gear, but have not yet field tested all of it. As well, a lot of the gear I've purchased can be considered camping gear instead of survival gear. I don't have my hunting kit put together for this coming hunting season yet, so I can't directly respond to your post, but I can contribute these thoughts:

If you have a ferro rod, make sure your knife/metal striker works with it. It needs to be high carbon steel with a 90 degree edge. Some stainless steel knives will not generate a spark.

In addition to testing your gear, make sure you know how to use it. In this regard, the emergency blankets come to mind.

You should be prepared to survive in the woods for 72 hours, under bad weather conditions, if need be. In this regard, remember to cover the ten C's: (These are the 10 I learned; it appears Canterbury changed some of them)

Cutting tool (A knife, preferably a non-folding, full tang, drop point knife)
Cumbustion (2 or 3 methods to make fire, like a lighter, strike anywhere matches, and a ferro rod plus some tinder like vaseline-covered cotton balls)
Cover (The clothes you are wearing, extra hat, scarf and socks, emergency blanket and a small tarp)
Container (single wall stainless steel water bottle that you can boil water in)
Cordage (A couple hanks of 550 paracord)
Communications (most likely your cell phone and an external battery pack, and a loud whistle and orange bandana for signaling)
Compass (and a paper map of where you are hunting)
Comfort (emergency bivvy sleeping bag, contractor garbage bags)
Chow (a liter of water and some food like granola bars, chocolate, instant coffee, ramen noodles)
Candle (headlamp, flashlight and tea candle)

Also, a first aid kit and a repair kit (duct tape, heavy duty needle, heavy thread, super glue)

Obviously, you need to tailor your gear to where you are hunting. In your backyard in early fall vs. in the ADK's in early winter.

This topic is so broad to me, it's hard for me to give a concise response. Sorry if I went beyond the scope of the thread.

I've been watching dave Canterbury on utube.I picked up some good info I was mostly looking for knots,but watch a bunch of his videos "Eat your damn coyotes"

I'm working on the first aid pack,but to me the pack kits have a lot of crap i'd never need.

good info here thanks[out of likes]

 

Did you go to the pathfinder school? 

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14 hours ago, left field said:

I remember dipping the heads of wooden matches into my mother's best nail polish to waterproof them. Damn was she pissed. 

Or at least remove it from the packaging.

I've been alone at my camp for a week working, which means felling trees, limbing and bucking. Before I start the chainsaw I send my wife a text telling her where I am on the property and what I'm doing. Then we check in with each other every hour until the saw goes away. 

giving them a timeline is a good practice. text the time and "ok" at least. a friend is a trooper and if crap is going down on a call while he's on duty he'll even text "ok" periodically to his wife just so she doesn't worry.


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13 hours ago, Dinsdale said:

For those with connection in the house building industry......a length of typar/tyvek house wrap from a 9' roll can be an excellent light weight, waterproof option for a survival or overnight situation. Light, durable, and very packable option.

I use a piece to field quarter and keep clean.

With some para cord acting as a ridge it can  make a quick easy fly tent I have used to wait out a rain storm.

At least one member here other than me carries a piece.

I put some grommets in doubled over corners in one that work well.

you can also take a small rock shoved into the tyvek/tarp/whatever like you're making a ghost and then tie the cord tight around it. works well enough if you stay far enough from the edge.

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11 hours ago, goosifer said:

By green tree, I assume you mean an evergreen like pine, spruce, etc.? Otherwise, aside from birch bark, you'd want dry, dead wood for kindling.

i was talking about pine yea but i meant shaving from a live aka 'green' tree that's producing pine pitch/resin. if you're in a spot with pines that aren't massive tall mature ones then to what your saying the dead shaded branches still attached to the trunk underneath will have parts that are thin to make great dry kindling to go around and over those pine sap loaded shavings. birch bark is not as important to me because there's not as many birch trees around unless your in an area that was opened up by people, fire, or more commonly logging.

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3 hours ago, rachunter said:

I've been watching dave Canterbury on utube.I picked up some good info I was mostly looking for knots,but watch a bunch of his videos "Eat your damn coyotes"

I'm working on the first aid pack,but to me the pack kits have a lot of crap i'd never need.

good info here thanks[out of likes]

 

Did you go to the pathfinder school? 

No, but a fellow student who started when I did (Jan 2018) did. I will ask him how one year of the class we take compares to what he learned at Pathfinder School. I would like to go to a school/class but none are nearby and or doesn't work with other things I have scheduled. One day . . . .

I hear ya on the first aid packs. I have a couple of bigger ones for camping, but like to do my own small ones for hunting and for travel.

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I have no survival pack..dont go anywhere I'd need one...

Same here. I do bring one when I bear hunt though, there have been a couple instances where the lake kicks up or an outboard won’t start and guys couldn’t get back to camp. Great topic though!


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I have a whistle that doubles as a waterproof match holder. I think there may even be a cheap compass on one end. 

My work backpack has a whistle built into the buckle in case I get lost at Ohare airport


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for those talking about heating up water so you don't get beaver fever. lifestraws are nice and especially bottles. that said nobody in their right mind will carry around a small pot camp, can of liquid fuel, etc. that's much extra weight. a 32 oz metal water bottle alone is a lot of weight.  if you're not rountinely thinking about getting into a pickle, you can have a nicely folded/rolled up supply of commercial grade xtra heavy duty aluminum foil permanently stashed in a pocket. if you're careful enough you can form some of it into a small cup set in embers of to the side of your fire to boil water. a set of pliers on a multi-tool work great for picking it up to let it cool down. not something that's really reusable but a little water can go a long ways. nice 8+" relatively flat rock set in coals off to the side make a great cooking surface for venison or whatever meat too.

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2 minutes ago, The_Real_TCIII said:


My work backpack has a whistle built into the buckle in case I get lost at Ohare airport


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rape whistles count.... still a whistle that functions all the same.

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58 minutes ago, The_Real_TCIII said:


My work backpack has a whistle built into the buckle in case I get lost at Ohare airport


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Tacks dressed for travel

583857_839f0380_m.jpeg

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1 hour ago, dbHunterNY said:

for those talking about heating up water so you don't get beaver fever. lifestraws are nice and especially bottles. that said nobody in their right mind will carry around a small pot camp, can of liquid fuel, etc. that's much extra weight. a 32 oz metal water bottle alone is a lot of weight.  if you're not rountinely thinking about getting into a pickle, you can have a nicely folded/rolled up supply of commercial grade xtra heavy duty aluminum foil permanently stashed in a pocket. if you're careful enough you can form some of it into a small cup set in embers of to the side of your fire to boil water. a set of pliers on a multi-tool work great for picking it up to let it cool down. not something that's really reusable but a little water can go a long ways. nice 8+" relatively flat rock set in coals off to the side make a great cooking surface for venison or whatever meat too.

Love the foil idea. I do not have that in my bag and I should. Also, anything paper will boil water even if set directly into the fire or coals. The paper will not burn 


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3 minutes ago, Culvercreek hunt club said:

Love the foil idea. I do not have that in my bag and I should. Also, anything paper will boil water even if set directly into the fire or coals. The paper will not burn 

My instructor was telling me that he now carries an oven roasting bag to use to boil water in his "pocket" survival kit. As long as its over coals and not flames, it can handle the heat enough to boil water. Bit awkward, though, as it doesn't hold it's shape like the foil. Maybe carry both?

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