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Here's an email I got from the original person I emailed :

 

 

Thanks for reaching out!

 

Right now, the transgenic American chestnut tree can only be planted on United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) permitted sites until a full review is completed by the USDA, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Food and Drug Administration (FDA).  We expect this review to take an additional one to two years.  Upon approval by the USDA, EPA and FDA, the transgenic American chestnut should be ready for individuals such as you.

 

In the meantime, our team anticipates the open comment period for the USDA during Jan/Feb 2020. The comment period is important to our project as it allows the general public to participate in the regulatory process, and aids these agencies in their decision making. We would appreciate your support by submitting a comment when the time comes. 

 

I will add your name to our list of people to be notified about the open comment period, and of federal approval to distribute blight resistant American chestnut trees to the public.

 

If you haven’t done so already, I encourage you to join The American Chestnut Foundation at http://www.acf.org. This will inform you of the happenings in both our biotech and breeding programs for the American chestnut.

 

For more information about the American chestnut project, please visit http://www.esf.edu/chestnut/. You can follow our progress on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/groups/esfchestnut/.

 

I look forward to your potential grove of American chestnuts in future years!

 

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From what I read, they added a some wheat genes to the original trees genetic makeup.  This makes them better able to heal and regenerate where the blight attacks them.  Interesting stuff!  Also I know we have some young chestnuts up on the farm somewhere, I think I've always written off the leaves as beech.  I'll be paying closer attention from now on.  Sounds like I need to get a game plan together for 2 years from now to plant a Chestnut Grove.  They prefer Sandy and acidic soil, I have just the spot for them!

Edited by UpStateRedNeck
idiocy
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31 minutes ago, UpStateRedNeck said:

From what I read, they added a some wheat genes to the original trees genetic makeup.  This makes them better able to heal and regenerate where the blight attacks them.  Interesting stuff!  Also I know we have some young chestnuts up on the farm somewhere, I think I've always written off the leaves as beech.  I'll be paying closer attention from now on.  Sounds like I need to get a game plan together for 2 years from now to plant a beech Grove.  They prefer Sandy and acidic soil, I have just the spot for them!

Planting beech? I wish I could get rid of the 1000's of beech saplings we currently have growing in a few areas of our property. I'm not a big fan of beech.

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8 minutes ago, Bigbuckdown2019 said:

Planting beech? I wish I could get rid of the 1000's of beech saplings we currently have growing in a few areas of our property. I'm not a big fan of beech.

Never type a post while your kid is pestering you.  No, chestnuts.  We have tons of beech too.  It's just taking up space in my timber woods that could be growing sweet, sweet maple logs.  I do like the scrubby beech stuff around the field edges.  It also burns pretty good too, but the window is narrow on it rotting out.  I like to girdle about a dozen of them, then get them down and split about 2 years later.  Rot sets in quick if you drop them.

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  • 3 months later...
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Got this email earlier in the week, on Vacation with the fam so a little behind.

 

Dear American chestnut enthusiast,
 
You are receiving this letter because you had previously inquired about our blight-tolerant American chestnut trees developed at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY-ESF). After decades of innovative research, we are working with regulatory agencies to receive permission to distribute these trees to the public and use them in ecosystem restoration projects. We are at a critical juncture with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) as they review our petition for determination of nonregulated status of the blight-resistant Darling 58 American chestnut. At this time, we are asking for your help in this process. The USDA 60-day public comment period began on August 19, 2020, and closes October 19, 2020. This is your opportunity to submit a comment and let USDA regulators know what the restoration of the American chestnut means to you.
 
If you’re interested in adding a comment of your support, please use the following link:
 
Our colleagues at The American Chestnut Foundation have prepared a series of informative documents to help people navigate the comment process. You can view the documents here: https://www.esf.edu/chestnut/open-comment.htm
 
If you need a quick review of our project, please watch this short award winning video https://vimeopro.com/lss/2020-templeton-telly-awards-1
 
The best way you can help the American Chestnut Research and Restoration Project at SUNY ESF right now is by voicing your support of the transgenic American chestnut as a forest restoration tool. Please participate and forward this letter to family and friends asking for their support as well. Thank you for your help in saving the American chestnut!
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6 hours ago, Marsala-man said:

https://www.treepro.com/wildlife-food-plot-trees

I recommend looking at this nursery. The grow tube is a huge need and some of the trees I put in May 2021 were almost to the top of the 6' tube by end of the growing season. That's impressive since they were only about 18" when I put them in the ground. 

Looks like the site hasnt been updated in a while but thanks for sharing.

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Depending on your location, most NY Walmart stores begin receiving Dunstans and selling them end of May.

The trees range from  4 to 6 feet:  the smaller are about $30 and the larger around $50 as I  remember. Assuming like the price of everything else would expect to pay more this year. Chestnut Hill usually lists when trees will be delivered and I think you can sign up for alerts. Good Luck!

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6 hours ago, Glen said:

Depending on your location, most NY Walmart stores begin receiving Dunstans and selling them end of May.

The trees range from  4 to 6 feet:  the smaller are about $30 and the larger around $50 as I  remember. Assuming like the price of everything else would expect to pay more this year. Chestnut Hill usually lists when trees will be delivered and I think you can sign up for alerts. Good Luck!

I bought some Dunstan trees  but sadly none survived due to heavy clay soil that hold on to moisture too much in the spring. I was told afterwards that its best to plant these on a mound.

Edited by suburbanfarmer
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44 minutes ago, UpStateRedNeck said:

I'm still hoping this gets approved this year, I very much want to grow an orchard of my own.  Maybe my kids will be able to enjoy it.

 

https://www.thenews-messenger.com/story/news/2022/02/23/ken-baker-scientists-may-able-restore-american-chestnut/6880174001/

If your get pure American you will see it if you live 5 to 7 years they grow like weeds

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cheapest way and easy to do is to buy nuts and start your own trees plenty on you tube on it did it a few years back started with maybe a dozen trees got about 6 growing good now others that did not make it were were bad locations

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cheapest way and easy to do is to buy nuts and start your own trees plenty on you tube on it did it a few years back started with maybe a dozen trees got about 6 growing good now others that did not make it were were bad locations
What did you figure out to be a bad location and why please?

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

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well one was to wet in the spring the other was in a stream bottom i guess could say and its always much colder there with very early and late frosts,,, kinda of a weird spot where on windless nights all the cold air just sits,,, the trees would start to sprout leaves and they got hit with hard frosts killed them if you could have got them going a few years may have made it but the year i put them there was brutal

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I lost every one of the Dunstan that I planted seven years ago, but some of the Chinese that I've grown from seed are entering their sixth year and doing well. Not all, but some. I highly recommend cages and weed mats over tubes. The downside of tubes in the woods in that the trees grow spindly with multiple suckers, rodents inhabit them and girdle the trees, wasps and ants build nests in them, and even 5' tubes can get browsed by deer. Also, wooden stakes will rot over a couple seasons, and then your work is lying on the ground. Finally, you need to keep them clear of leaves and debris. 

Can you guess that I hate tubes? I'm not completely sold on Chestnut either, but the jury is still out. The trees in our backyard are >20 years old - production is vertical, with a short, but heavy fall. The squirrel get most of them. I suspect that there's a place in a whitetail minded forest, but only as part of diverse plantings.

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