blackbeltbill

The NUT King: The AMERICAN CHESTNUT TREE.

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Chestnut burs just starting to open will be falling this comming week


I've hunted almost everyday of my life.. the rest have been wasted!

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The American Chestnut nuts are so nutritious a human could actually survive on eating them alone.  Ten adult chestnut trees could provide enough nuts for 1 person to live on for an entire year.  It has been said that the nuts were a preferred food for deer,bear, turkey, grouse and sadly the passenger pigeon (the chestnuts demise pushed that bird into oblivion).  If we get the chestnut trees back into the ecosystem in large numbers.... the land could support a huge increase in all wildlife as chestnuts produce every year since they don't bloom until July.  Support the Darling-58 project and not the chinese-american hybrid cross.

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    From my various readings- The American Chestnut was the preferred and #1 Mast Crop for Wild Turkeys.  

     Another reason that the Wild Turkey Population dipped to a all time low of an estimated 33,000 Nationwide was the Demise of the American Chestnut Tree.

     

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"Support the Darling-58 project and not the chinese-american hybrid cross."

Not sure that the genetically engineered Darling-58 is something I am ready to support without more info.

Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk

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Anything labeled GMO is not always bad.

The Darling-58 tree has 1 (one) gene from wheat (the plant we already eat) that prevents the fungus from killing the tree. The hybrid American-Chinese cross has over 1000 extra genes from the Chinese chestnut so many of the unwanted Chinese traits ( Size, shape, growth etc.) appear on the hybrid  besides the resistance to the fungus. (The fungus is not killed but the gene breaks down the oxalic acid produced by the fungus. Oxalic Oxidase produced by the gene is found in many of the foods we already eat without issue.

The Chinese-American cross is a short stature tree that does not grow tall enough to be used in our Eastern Forests for effective reintroduction to the wild.  Those trees will NEVER bring back the Chestnut to it's former prominence in the woods, as they will be an under story tree (being crowded out by taller growing trees)  instead of a canopy tree. (Remember 100 years ago one out of every 4 trees in the eastern forests were American Chestnuts and they grew tall and the wood made many landowners money when the trees were logged)

With the coming demise of the Ash and hemlock due to introduced pathogens we need a tree like this.

Fear and ignorance not the science are the major stumbling blocks in reintroducing this keystone species back into the wild.

A better more comprehensive explanation can be found  in the Journal of the American Chestnut Foundation Spring 2020 Issue 2 Vol 34 .page 21-2...  Take the time to educate yourself and know the science not the irrational fear many are trying to indoctrinate us with.

 

       

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On 10/8/2020 at 11:03 AM, Arcade Hunter said:

Silly question, but I dont know.  Will deer eat chestnuts?

They will stand under the tree waiting for them to drop. Raw American chestnut taste like sugared almonds.


I've hunted almost everyday of my life.. the rest have been wasted!

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On 10/21/2020 at 5:06 PM, blackbeltbill said:

    From my various readings- The American Chestnut was the preferred and #1 Mast Crop for Wild Turkeys.  

     Another reason that the Wild Turkey Population dipped to a all time low of an estimated 33,000 Nationwide was the Demise of the American Chestnut Tree.

     

Its was the food source for passenger pidgeon.. funny how cutting them all down and a blight removed food and habitat , but they were killed by over hunting..smh


I've hunted almost everyday of my life.. the rest have been wasted!

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Comment period ended a week ago, hope everybody got a chance to comment!  

 

https://beta.regulations.gov/document/APHIS-2020-0030-0001/comment

 

 

Maybe I should have shamelessly bumped the topic more?

 

 


'08 Bowtech Commander

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I have been trying to get chestnut trees going for a few years with little success. Part of the problem is I'm in 4a Tug Hill area. Get some harsh winters at times. These trees tend to hang onto their leaves, property gets frozen rain or wet snow, then the weight does damage. Decided to try again planted 4 more, watered them all about three times a month up until late Sept. So that makes 6 and two more from surviving shoots. They seem to have an ability to survive but not adapt as well like any of the oaks I planted.


Hey Joe,... from my Cold Dead Hands.

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TUG hill plateau is at the extreme northern range for the chestnut.  Can you get a SW exposure with some shelter from the wind?  About 4 years ago Allen Nichols from the NYAC Chapter gave me 4 sprouted nuts.  I planted them. One died within months, the other three are still growing. However 1 is only 5 feet tall and the other 2 are better than 12 feet. I found 3 trees on my neighbors property that are producing catkins and 1 had sterile nuts last year.  Before I die I am hoping to get the multiple Darling trees and some improved offspring growing on my place.  But with the election results...I fear science is NOT going to be a factor in releasing the tree.   

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I'm batting .400 on Chestnut. I've had good success with some of the Chinese hybrids, and I've planted some pure American that will likely blight eventually. However, even though we are in 5/6, there are areas on my property that simply will not grow Chestnut. Compared to the other 3000+ stems I've put into the ground, Chestnut is one of the hardest to propagate. And since we have four mature trees in the backyard (Chinese variety, of course), I know that the drop time is generally too early to be of much use to anything but squirrel. And yet I'm still fascinated by them...

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