Fat Dan

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About Fat Dan

  • Rank
    Newbie Hunter

Extra Info

  • Hunting Location
    Pennsylvania
  • Hunting Gun
    338 Federal
  • Bow
    Bowtech
  • HuntingNY.com
    google

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  1. I have planted apples, crab apples, pear, and Chinese chestnuts. Apples are the highest maintenance because insects really go for the leaves. Pear is a good fruit that is low maintenance but you have to get cold hardy varieties if you are far north. Otherwise, they will freeze out. Chinese chestnuts take a few years to produce but I think they are my favorite of the trees I have planted.
  2. It’s possible. Based on my observations in PA, I think allowing crossbows had a bigger impact in suburban areas. The big woods are hard to hunt with a rifle, never mind a crossbow. I saw people near me (urban-ish) who didn’t have the time or space to practice with a bow take up crossbow. The people who were passionate about archery seem to have frequently stuck with a standard bow. I am in between and I use both/either depending on how I am feeling at the moment. Based on my observations and unscientific conclusions, I think a good number of rifle hunters have taken up crossbow hunting in PA. I think a lot of them fill their freezers close to home. At least that is one of my theories on why I see a lot fewer hunters on the big public tracts in the mountains here. I haven’t compared harvest stats so I could be way off. All I know is that crossbows didn’t increase hunting pressure at all where I hunt in the mountains in archery season and our number of rifle hunters seems way lower.
  3. Yeah. I live in an sort of suburban (technically designated as urban but not all rowhomes) area. There are deer in high numbers anywhere that there are a few acres of woods. There is no legal hunting in my town but a bit farther into the suburbs, there are a lot of small, private woodlots where people bow hunt. It is hard to get access though. Some of these places are crawling with deer. I personally hunt as much for the experience/pursuit so it doesn't appeal to me enough to seek permission in these spots. I know people who do really well though.
  4. Versus this: (I need a better camera)
  5. We used to have really intense hunting pressure where I hunt. There is about 10,000 acres of public land and it was crawling with hunters 25 years ago. Sometimes it was downright scary and I would dress head to toe in orange. This year I saw 1 other hunter that was not in my group. There are cars at the access points and you hear some shooting but it is amazing how few hunters there are compared to when I started hunting. Back then, I think very few bucks made it through. On top of the pressure, there were no antler restrictions and nobody I knew passed up a shot at a legal buck. I don't know it the change is just less hunters overall or if it is because archery has gotten so popular. Guys that I know who were always mountain hunters are killing most of their bucks these days in suburban woodlots with bows or crossbows. I think it must be a combination of those things and maybe others as well. The bucks are living longer now and there are some surprisingly good bucks on public land now. Here is one that made it through last winter. I am starting to think it might be the same buck that I posted above. The pic was taken in the same spot around this time last year. What do you think, same buck?
  6. 1. Cherry 2. Ash (probably dead or soon will be) 3. Beech 4. Ash (enjoy it while it lasts) 5. 80 percent sure it’s a sugar maple
  7. That’s a passive rot. I can’t believe it didn’t even bark. I had a boerboel that would go crazy when he’d hear a coyote. A coyote is way faster than most dogs and are surprisingly scrappy. I think if the rottie caught it, you’d be surprised by the way the coyote handled itself. That looks like a western coyote (I could be wrong). The ones that I see are usually bigger.
  8. Here too. I have several decent bucks that have shown up on my camera since the season ended. Our property is surrounded by public hunting land but the pressure has been light the past couple years for some reason. I guess next year should be a good year. This is the the biggest one:
  9. I was watching some videos last night of people catching steelhead in the Pacific North West. Out there, a lot of guys catch them on Spin-N-Glo rigs. Sometimes they use bait but they also catch them on the plain Spin-N-Glo. Does this technique translate to great lakes steelhead?
  10. I use a Maglite if I am hunting close. If I am going deep in, I wear a head lamp (a long drag with a flashlight in your mouth sucks, I've learned that first hand). I have never bothered to use a red light. I do have a couple red lights for predator hunting and they do seem a lot more stealthy. Like some of the guys who already posted, I frequently don't use a light at all if the hike is short and I know the area well. Eyes adapt well without a light. However, I use one even when I don't need it when I hunt public land. I have a concern, maybe irrational, that some overexcited hunter might mistake me for game if I pass them without a light. All things being equal, if I had a red light on hand, I would probably use that.
  11. Good advice. Try the washer to find out before cutting anything, though.
  12. The drawings for a lot of States - maybe all - for 2021 hunting have not happened yet. There is still time to draw a tag for the fall. I did one public land DIY hunt in Colorado. I drove out there alone and bowhunted solo in an OTC zone. It was tough hunting and I didn't connect but I had a great experience. I also saw elk and other wildlife. I am planning to try again in 2022. I have a few preference points for Colorado so I will probably go back there. I have considered MT too though. I guess you have a much higher success rate if you are willing to drop $10,000+ on a trip but I did it cheap and enjoyed it a lot.
  13. Yeah, this is good advice. I used to have problems with cams in the cold and also with my GPS. I switched to the lithium batteries and it is much, much better.