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I had (3) days to use up by the end of June, so I cashed in 1/2 of one today.   I stopped at Rineharts and picked up 200 pounds of triple 15 starter fertilizer (that is enough for 4 acres of corn at the rate I use it).  The cost of that was $ 9.40 per 50 lb bag.   I also picked up 2.5 gallons of Crop-Smart (41 % gly), which was $ 14 per gallon, and about a pound of sweetcorn seed while I was there.   I have lots of leftover field corn seed ready to go, since last year was too wet to get any planted.       

I got home in time to get about 2 acres plowed for the corn, on my driest ground.   I hope to get that spot planted by June 1st.   The other wetter spot (about an acre), I hope to get in by the end of June.  I will save 50 pounds of fertilizer for tunips planted in late July.   The current plots will be mostly field corn, and each will get about 1/2 pound of sweetcorn planted along the edge mostly for raccoon eradication purposes.   I am looking forward to trapping as many of those as possible this summer, starting when the corn starts making tassles, hopefully by early August.  The sweetcorn will draw them from miles around.  We might get a few meals out of it ourselves, if it don't cross-polinate with the field corn too bad and if the coons don't take it all out before I get them.  

 

Our town is being ravaged by rabies right now.   The best way to fight that is to get rid of the coons.  Since fur prices tanked, no one traps them anymore, resulting in an out of control population and rabies.  I did not plant any corn or trap any coons last year and the neighborhood pet-owners are paying the price for that right now.   Two years ago, the coyotes would dig up the coon carcasses within a night or two of my burrying them (the DEC recommends that landowners bury or burn "damaging" coons prior to the opening of regular trapping season in mid-October).  There don't seem to be any coyotes left around, based on the numbers of red fox that I am seeing (I ran over a young one on the way to work this morning).  Nonetheless, I am not taking any chances with the coon carcasses this year, so I have a fine burning barrel all ready for the carcasses.   There is so much fat on them in August that I imagine they will light up like roman candles after a little squirt of lighter fluid:

559488619_bigcoon.JPG.01e5381e28c2e606576db3cb4a542c87.JPG

I hope all the corn that should be left standing, after the coon eradication, will result in a few deer hanging around here after the first shot is fired on opening day of gun season this fall.   Last fall, with no corn around, they all bugged out at that time and I had a hard time even finding a track back there in the snow after December 1.  That was why I did not use up more vacation days then.  I will save them last 2-1/2 days until after bass season opens up on the third Saturday in June (I got to fill that freezer one way or the other).  

corn plot 1 2020 plow.jpeg

Edited by wolc123
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Nice wolc123.  Field is coming glad you got some time in the seat this afternoon it was nice out.  I got 10 50 lb bags of fertilizer and planted another 1 acre tonight.  I plan on spreading fertilizer tomorrow as I’ve got the corn in about 4 acres of ground ready for beans so going to fertilize and then start planting beans next week it’s going to get hot Tuesday Wednesday above 85 should be good start planting beans.   
it’s funny you mention the raccoon my daughter videoed one running across our driveway a few days ago in the middle of the day looking sickly I have had some run-ins with some sick ones it didn’t go well for them   Keep us posted I want to see that corn come up

 

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Definitely a scruffy looking coon..

Looks like you guys have some nice soil to work with....Here on the hilltops in Dogpatch I have to work with mostly rocks and clay....

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6 hours ago, Pygmy said:

Definitely a scruffy looking coon..

Looks like you guys have some nice soil to work with....Here on the hilltops in Dogpatch I have to work with mostly rocks and clay....

It is real easy to grow stuff with minimal fertilizer on the dark bottomland soil at our place on the NW corner of WMU 9F.   I can get well over 100 bu/acre corn with just 50 lbs/acre of starter fertilizer, and no later urea application, simply by planting it on a 3-4 year clover / 1 year corn rotation.  The only trouble I have here is that some years (like last), it takes a long time for the ground to dry out enough in the spring to get my plantings in.  

My folks place, on the SE corner of the same WMU, is above the Onondaga escarpment, a bit rocky, but much better drained and takes more nitrogen to get good corn yields.   There is enough cover over there, and surrounding cornfields that I no longer bother with that, or any spring plowing.  That was always easy over there (except for the occasional rocks).   The only thing I plant there is an occasional early fall "refresh" of wheat/soybean/white clover mix.    White clover does about 90 % of the "deer-attraction" work for me over there.    

8 hours ago, Lomax said:

Nice wolc123.  Field is coming glad you got some time in the seat this afternoon it was nice out.  I got 10 50 lb bags of fertilizer and planted another 1 acre tonight.  I plan on spreading fertilizer tomorrow as I’ve got the corn in about 4 acres of ground ready for beans so going to fertilize and then start planting beans next week it’s going to get hot Tuesday Wednesday above 85 should be good start planting beans.   
it’s funny you mention the raccoon my daughter videoed one running across our driveway a few days ago in the middle of the day looking sickly I have had some run-ins with some sick ones it didn’t go well for them   Keep us posted I want to see that corn come up

 

I had to do considerable work on that old tractor over the winter (new distributor and battery) but it really does a good job on the plow when the soil conditions are just right like they were yesterday.   Some years, it is too wet to use it, and I need to go with my newer 4wd John Deere.  That one will pull that little 2 x 12" plow thru standing water in the wet spots (it is kind of cool watching the wakes roll off of the plow shares).   The 4wd lacks "draft-control" however, so it is tougher to maintain uniform plow depth with it, than with that old Ford.   The Ford still has the original (1951) calcium-filled rear rims on it, but one is starting to look like it is getting ready to blow out from corrosion.   When and if I need to replace those, I probably will not re-load them, or do any more plowing with it.   It will still be good on my 2-row corn planter and cultivator, and better for hauling firewood around on the 3-point carryall, without loaded rear tires.     

Edited by wolc123
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Got 2.5 acre of field corn in yesterday right before this rain. Still have acre of soybean to do. Perhaps later this week.

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I've hunted almost everyday of my life.. the rest have been wasted!

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1 hour ago, G-Man said:

Got 2.5 acre of field corn in yesterday right before this rain. Still have acre of soybean to do. Perhaps later this week.

We got a little rain last night.  I just got back from a little turkey hunting near the back field that I hope to get plowed in the next few weeks.  The warm weather is sure is making the grass grow fast, so I will probably need to bush-hog it before plowing.   It is not easy taking that 6 ft bush hog on and off my tractor.   It is on it now, so I will use it to cut that field in addition to the lane on the way back there (my pants are soaked right now from walking back thru the wet high grass).   I need to take the bush-hog off for disking anyhow, but it looks like I have some more cutting to do first.    No signs of any turkeys, but I did see the first few mosquitoes of the season, so it looks like that is the end of my turkey hunting. 

I have a couple of disks, both of which are sized just right for that old Ford (a 6.5 ft 3-point and an 8 ft pull-type), but a bit undersized for my John Deere 4wd.   A nice thing about using the undersized implements, is that I can still use them if the soil conditions are less than ideal, which is usually the case.   I usually use the 4wd JD on the disk, rather than the old 2wd Ford 8n, or my Allis Chalmers model C,  since it is so much more fuel efficient thanks to the tier-3 diesel engine and the "live" front axle.   I like the old Ford on the 2-row corn planter though, because it is so nice and quiet and the low operator platform makes it easy to get on or off from either side.  I hop on and off of it a lot while planting, to check that the planter's seed and fertilizer hoppers are not empty and that they are delivering properly.   The tricycle front, on the old Allis Chalmers C is great on the pull-type disk, but only after the ground is good and dry.  The 8-footer is a bit too much for it otherwise, especially at the steeper angle settings.          

Edited by wolc123
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8 minutes ago, wolc123 said:

We got a little rain last night.  I just got back from a little turkey hunting near the back field that I hope to get plowed in the next few weeks.  The warm weather is sure is making the grass grow fast, so I will probably need to bush-hog it before plowing.   It is not easy taking that 6 ft bush hog on and off my tractor.   It is on it now, so I will use it to cut that field in addition to the lane on the way back there (my pants are soaked right now from walking back thru the wet high grass).   I need to take the bush-hog off for disking anyhow, but it looks like I have some more cutting to do first.    No signs of any turkeys, but I did see the first few mosquitoes of the season, so it looks like that is the end of my turkey hunting. 

I have a couple of disks, both of which are sized just right for that old Ford (a 6.5 ft 3-point and an 8 ft pull-type), but a bit undersized for my John Deere 4wd.   A nice thing about using the undersized implements, is that I can still use them if the soil conditions are less than ideal, which is usually the case.   I usually use the 4wd JD on the disk, rather than the old 2wd Ford 8n, or my Allis Chalmers model C,  since it is so much more fuel efficient thanks to the tier-3 diesel engine and the "live" front axle.   I like the old Ford on the 2-row corn planter though, because it is so nice and quiet and the low operator platform makes it easy to get on or off from either side.  I hop on and off of it a lot while planting, to check that the planter's seed and fertilizer hoppers are not empty and that they are delivering properly.   The tricycle front, on the old Allis Chalmers C is great on the pull-type disk, but only after the ground is good and dry.  The 8-footer is a bit too much for it otherwise, especially at the steeper angle settings.          

Hard to beat an old ford for.durability and ease of use. A lot.of " food plot " equipment is just the right size for it. When I really.need to get done in a hurry my Oliver 1800 and a 16 in 5 bottom plow get brought out. This year got a good jump on things, but still waiting for corn seed to come in from nwtf,  the qdma cancelled their soybean :( .  Have 3 acres in corn stubble I'm trying to decide what to do with depending on seed,  may turn later and put in winter rye with clover mix. Some brassica in part of it.. 

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I've hunted almost everyday of my life.. the rest have been wasted!

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21 minutes ago, G-Man said:

Hard to beat an old ford for.durability and ease of use. A lot.of " food plot " equipment is just the right size for it. When I really.need to get done in a hurry my Oliver 1800 and a 16 in 5 bottom plow get brought out. This year got a good jump on things, but still waiting for corn seed to come in from nwtf,  the qdma cancelled their soybean :( .  Have 3 acres in corn stubble I'm trying to decide what to do with depending on seed,  may turn later and put in winter rye with clover mix. Some brassica in part of it.. 

Fortunately, I have never needed to purchase field corn seed or soybeans, because much of my own and my wife's family's are in the Ag business, and there is always available "leftover".    I have plenty of corn for this year and hopefully my nephew will come thru with some leftover soybeans in time for me to mix in with my early fall wheat/clover plantings.    I used to use rye in the fall, but wheat is always easier for me to find, cheaper, and the deer seem to like it better, so that is what I have been using lately.    It might also be the soybean "candy" that I have been adding to that fall mix that has been attracting them better the last few years.   If you are able to, you might want to save a bit of soybeans for that usage.   With the late frosts we have been getting (climate change ?), those late soybean plantings have been effective at drawing deer to the plots, early in archery season.    

It looks like I have a good spot for turnips this year (on that plowed strip just to the front of the willows).   About (6) years ago, when that ground was at the same corn/clover rotation, I had a little turnip patch there.  It is hard to beat a combination of standing corn and frozen turnip greens.  I was able to take a fine button-buck, right from my bedroom window, with my ML in mid December that year.   I had just got home from work and was glassing the standing corn.   I watched him stand up and walk out to feed on turnips, about 5 minutes before sunset.   Up goes the window, on goes the cap, and down goes the BB.   That made for one fine Christmas feast.     

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Spot on Wolv123. Late season rifle and ML Have become one of my favorite times of the year now if you have the food corn brassicas turnips and magic beans You tend to see a lot of deer in the afternoons and can draw bux from a ways off. I run cameras pretty much all year around and I tend to pick up different box that I haven’t seen before in that second week of December that’s when the turnips and winter greens seem to be the draw.  I really wish New York State would leave the season open through Christmas course my wife and kids wouldn’t I think a BB on Christmas would be a great gift 

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4 hours ago, Lomax said:

Spot on Wolv123. Late season rifle and ML Have become one of my favorite times of the year now if you have the food corn brassicas turnips and magic beans You tend to see a lot of deer in the afternoons and can draw bux from a ways off. I run cameras pretty much all year around and I tend to pick up different box that I haven’t seen before in that second week of December that’s when the turnips and winter greens seem to be the draw.  I really wish New York State would leave the season open through Christmas course my wife and kids wouldn’t I think a BB on Christmas would be a great gift 

My wife is always ecstatic when I bring home a button buck.  They are just so tender.   Unfortunately, I only manage to come up with one every other year on average (this ought to be an "on" year, especially if that turnip patch produces like I hope it will)..   Anything with antlers worries her a little, especially if it leads to a taxidermy bill and the loss of some wall space.   

I agree that it would be nice if the Southern zone deer season remained open until January 3rd or so.   That would give me a few additional non-work days to hunt, without having to use vacation time, and I could deer hunt on my birthday.    

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Ha my misses is the same way she likes the no taxi bill come summer too.  I just get euro mounts now....unless I get a giant one.  I think it would be nice if NYS extended broke up the season more.  It seems like the herd is pretty abundant and healthy in my area 7F.   Maybe some buck only season w xbow or M.L for those who didnt full buck tag into late Dec or January....get more use out of these late season plots. A 3 to 5 day season in Mid Jan after duck hunting would be something to look forward too but only if herd numbers support it.   

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