airedale

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airedale last won the day on January 17 2017

airedale had the most liked content!

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About airedale

  • Rank
    Elite NY Hunter
  • Birthday 11/30/1948

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://huntingwithairedales.blogspot.com/2010/07/hunting-with-airedales.html

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Central NY
  • Interests
    Retired now, have a small hobby farm, raise a few chickens and have a small herd of Irish Dexter cattle. I enjoy all of the outdoor sports although as I get older I do not get out much as I once did. I like hunting small game best and I am especially fond of hunting with dogs. Always a firearms buff doing minor mods and smithing to individualize my firearms to my taste and loading custom ammo to fire in them. I also like the shooting sports from competition to just informal plinking and target shooting which is what I do most these days.

    I also run the Traditional Working Airedale Message board, http://traditionalairedale.proboards.com/

Extra Info

  • Hunting Location
    central ny
  • Hunting Gun
    I have several that I like a lot but if I had to pin it down to one it would be my Ruger 77 220 Swift
  • Bow
    Vintage Oneida Eagle Aeroforce, Vintage Bear Cub recurve, Vintage Bear Alaskan compound, Vintage Bear Super Kodiak recurve bought in the 60s also a vintage Browning Explorer 1 compound bow.
  • HuntingNY.com
    Read about it on a craigslist ad

Recent Profile Visitors

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  1. Everything done in the field is quick and minimal to remove some weight prior to the drag out, I just want the guts and blood out, the liver and heart bagged along with some cooling. When I get them home and pulled up on the hoist is when I finish up and do the fine detailing prior to the actual butchering. I love the way a Wyoming knife unzips them and also for skinning but not so much for the innards and butt, so I carry and use my old two blade Western most of the time. Al
  2. Snowshoe Hares have a definite preference habitat requirement to live in and sustain a good population. They mainly need relatively young thick conifer forests for protection, the closer the bottom branches are to the ground the better. A forest meeting those requirements will provide food, shelter and most importantly protection from predators and raptors. Back in the 1930s when the CCC operations was in full swing thousands of acres were reforested by the government with various conifers throughout the state. By the 50s, 60s and 70s these forests had matured to the point that they were ideal for Hare habitat and the Hare populations were bulging. I can remember my Dad hunting them during those peak years coming home after a Hare hunt with his cronies, the trunk of his car would be full of Hare. One old timer told me everyone thought they had a top notch hunting dog, he said the Hare were so thick you just turned a dog loose in the woods and waited on the edges and they would come pouring out, the pickings were pretty easy. I got to hunt the tail end of those good old days but as time went on the trees grew taller and taller and the cover became less and less. Today those forests are completely open, the lowest branches are many feet up and one can look down the rows of those planted trees and see well over a hundred yards. No place for a Hare to hide hence no Hare. While the old CCC forests are about shot for holding Hare one can still find a good large patch of low to the ground newer thick conifer forest in Hare country with some scouting, if you are lucky enough find one there will be Hare living in it and more than a few. Al
  3. Coyotes are basically a wild dog with a sense of smell that is very similar and no different to that of the average domestic dog. Having spent my entire life raising, training and hunting with various dog breeds I have seen first hand some pretty amazing feats of their scenting abilities which really can not be overstated. I have always been interested in the scientific side of a dog's scenting ability, I have studied their works extensively and have to go along with their findings 100%. Scientists with experience in testing the scenting ability of dogs say that they can detect some, if not most, odors at concentrations of parts per trillion. WOW! This is so amazing it is almost beyond comprehension. A quick example of what that huge sniffer sensitivity looks like. Let’s say you have a gram of a component of human sweat known as butyric acid. Surprisingly, humans are quite good at smelling this. If you let it evaporate in the space of a 10-story building, many of us would still be able to detect a faint scent upon entering the building. Not bad, for a human nose. But consider this: If you put the 135-square-mile city of Philadelphia under a 300-foot-high enclosure, evaporated the gram of butyric acid and let a dog in, the average dog would still be able to detect the odor. As master wolfer Gary Strader says you can trick the Coyote's sight with concealment and camo, their hearing and ears can be tricked with expert calling, but you will never be able to trick their nose. A side note, it is said that the Whitetail Deer has scenting ability that ranks right along side that of a Dog. Al
  4. An article I recently read has the NY Grouse population on the low side right now, factors like weather during nesting, habitat loss, predators and raptors all take a toll. Hopefully things will make a turn for the better. Some of the best places to find Grouse are in abandoned old overgrown apple orchards especially if they are laced with underbrush and briar patches. Along small creeks meandering through thick cover is another good place to check out. Most times when I am hunting this type of cover I am after Cottontail Rabbits, the Grouse seem to prefer this cover also and are a nice side benefit to the Rabbit hunt. Al
  5. Ebay has a Chinese self powered tow behind flail mower for a couple of grand shipped free. I purchased a 6ft wide Titan 3 point flail mower to use behind my tractor a few years ago to do my pastures and trails. I went with a flail over a brush hog type because of the smoother cut and the flail will not send rocks a couple of hundred yards to parts unknown like the brush hog type. Also a flail is up close to the rear of the tractor and not out way behind like a brush hog making for better maneuverability. If mowing brushy cover go with the hammer blades over the Y blades, they will pulverize brush and branches and still do a nice job mowing grass. Al
  6. No appeal at all for me, growing up watching Disney's Davey Crockett, TVs Daniel Boone and movies like Jeremiah Johnson I got the bug to hunt with traditional muzzleloaders because I like the challenge of those old sidelock type rifles, seems like everything has to be easier these days or it ain't worth the time messing with. I do allow for the luxury of percussion caps for more positive ignition over a flintlock. Al
  7. Any well bred hunting dog is going to born with drive to hunt game, under supervision they can be trained pretty well in obedience and can be controlled but left on their own they will follow their nose and take off for the hunt. Beagles are one of the oldest hunting breeds and one of the most driven, unless they are under supervision they need to be kept in a fenced in yard or run because they are hunters. That being said they are one of the best for pet temperament and love people, with some training in obedience they can serve both as a wonderful companion and a hunting dog that are great not only on Rabbits and Hare but work well for Pheasants. While most Beagles will run both Hare and Cottontails many are bred specifically for one or the other. Beagles for Hare usually 15 inch and larger are up on legs because of the snow, they generally have a colder nose and are speedy. They can gear down to hunt Cottontails but many still push them so hard the Cottontails will go in their holes before you can get a shot at them. Don't have that problem with Hare as they just keep on running and circling. Bred for Cottontails many are of the smaller size, they work a track more deliberately and slowly and you can get nice steady runs and importantly not drive the Rabbit to ground. My Beagles were Hare bred hounds, Josie the black and tan color was the best Beagle I ever had, the two Blueticks are Branko bred and were very good in their day also. Al
  8. The lighter weight compact case is about all I can see this cartridge has going for it and while there may be some kind of an advantage for this cartridge's use in a short barreled belt fed machine gun I do not see anything special for it down the road in the general public shooting-sporting world. The 270 Winchester can easily hit the same 3000fps with a 140 gr bullet and the 270 Win short mag and the 270 Weatherby mag can up that by a couple of hundred fps. Al
  9. Uncle Nicky said it pretty well in his post above, all dogs need some training and how much work you invest into your dog will go a long way in how it behaves and handles. With any hunting breed you need to pay attention to how they are bred and make sure they are being hunted and tested by the breeder. As for Airedales they are probably not for everyone, they are high energy and require a firm hand, but when trained properly they are a wonderful dog. I have a blog that covers much about Airedales and hunting and will answer a lot of questions about the breed, if you are interested, the link is posted below. http://huntingwithairedales.blogspot.com/2010/07/hunting-with-airedales.html Al
  10. My favorite method of hunting is teaming up with a good Dog, Hounds and Setters when specializing but for all around hunting small game I will take my Airedales, have taken tons of game and had a lot of fun over the last 50 plus years. Al