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Berniez

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  1. Sorry for the delay, but you can use the advice for next year. Please Open this link ,https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-h84ff-10af48d?utm_campaign=embed_player_stop&utm_medium=dlink&utm_source=embed_player,,, listen and learn, Remember you're growing clover for deer not dairy cows. . it's a long winter in NY, Create biomass. Let's make sure we leave them as much food as we can... Happy New Year to all
  2. Before you blame your green thumb read this article on Walnut trees https://www.groworganic.com/blogs/articles/companion-plants-that-tolerate-black-walnut-tree-toxicity Walnut husks are toxic to many fish too. Unless you have timber quality walnut trees or love gray squirrels they are a pain in the butt to have around. Just make sure you have sunlight for at least 7hours or more for your ground crops to thrive. This year I made a new 1/2 acre field of oats and white clover that I seeded in mid August.....the deer were in it during daylight hours every day all deer season. Just keeps planting and see what grows there is always next year (unless you are my age)
  3. Sorghum is tricky as some varieties have a natural coating on them that the deer do not favor; others are palatable. Also it sometimes takes a while for the deer to realize that it’s not just cover but food. ( I had to plant beans for 2 years before they figured out beans were bucco A-Number 1. I’VE NEVER REALLY HAD LUCK WITH ANY OF THE BRASSICAS OTHER THAN THEY LOOK GREEN. The deer in my area (4f by Oneonta) prefer oats, cereal rye, Beans, corn and clover. Buckwheat does keep the weeds down and both deer and bees love it. NO-till whatever you want into it in August and you will have success. This year I had to replant soybeans real late. I initially used 1 pass of glycophosphate. I was worried if any beans would set so in August I broadcast cereal rye into the bean field. To my surprise when the bean leaves fell off the cereal rye grew and left a green blanket. The deer now have both beans and rye in the field and seem to spend more time in the field. Next spring the rye will suppress the weeds and when time I can spray and no-till the beans. Hopefully this will work out great. Good luck and try it all
  4. Mind sharing the secret way how to prepare medallions of venison (without the pressure cooker) so it cuts without the need of a knife? Sure written or video ( I have neither ready) Let me know
  5. You folks pretty much guessed it right. I had a biologist look at the tooth wear and said,"He could be a few years older than 6½, but there’s no way to dial in on a year beyond 6½ looking at tooth wear." SO: 1.I will get it the tooth aged which will take a while cause I am busy 2. His diet was too farmland too worry about taste. He didn't have to run far for food or shelter as he had 3 swamps refuges within 100 yards of his food source.. I shot him going from 1 swamp to another crossing the soybean field between the two refuges. Having eaten parts already, it is not gamey or tough (I know how to prepare medallions of venison (without the pressure cooker) so it cuts without the need of a knife) 3. Second best shot of my life. Though I practiced at that range, Shooting a buck at a legitimate 389 yards ( As the Leopold laser finder said) is not the same as a paper target. Used a 6.5 x284 hand-loaded 140 grain Sierra SBT, IMR 4831 on a Krieger barrel fitted to a Browning left handed A-bolt action. Yeah Practice!!! 4. I shot one of his grandsons in the same field 2 years ago with the same serrated palmation rack configuration..but he was only 2 1/2 Have a Great Christmas and a Happy New Year and always a SAFE HUNT
  6. turkeyfeathers he looks chewy and gamey tasting We shall see but he walks out of a dense brush creek bed and walks into standing 5 acres of corn or 4 acres beans (which I leave for them) He sleeps it off in a swath of switchgrass and then can walk into beaver swamps on 3 sides of the fields. He has to travel no more than 300 yards in any direction for food/cover/safety.....so I am not worried about tough or chewy or gamey.
  7. Biz-R-OWorld Members 30.7k LocationWestchester County Posted 1 hour ago so many variables. What unit? Does he have any injuries that wacked out the rack? You should send the teeth to deerage.com Zone 4F There is 1 gsw on lower rt leg completely healed over and calloused.
  8. All year long we get some great pictures of bucks and we try to age them. However, we rarely/never find out a confirmed deer’s age. I have a buck running around my place all year and as you can see, while not the biggest, it’s a tall rack with palmation’s….unique is the word. Please look at the pictures and let’s see some age estimates. Pictures have been cropped but size not changed. While not the best position for aging, give it a try. I’ll reveal the answer on Tuesday Dec 7 as determined my tooth wear.
  9. I love mushrooms and pick some on my farm BUT, When I was in college I asked my pharmacognosy professor about how to ID mushrooms. The short answer was “Find a “stada Baba Polock” ( Old peasant grandmother from Poland) “She knows the stuff better than me. His longer answer was” Pick three or four species that you CAN”T be mistaken for anything but edible. You need a book and a loop or magnifying glass when you go out there. I like mushrooms so I make sure of my species before Taking them home.” And as an old marine sergeant once told me,,,,”Don’t be too stupid to live”. Both of these advices hold especially true for mushroom pickers. I pick only a few species that I cannot mistake for anything but edible and can eat them with great confidence. Around 2001 We had a long-time mushroom picker consumed some white mushrooms he picked at a state park on a Sunday morning ate them that evening. He was sick a few hours later, went to the local hospital treated, felt fine and was released that evening. On Wednesday he started to feel ill and returned to the hospital. Lab results showed meteoric rise in liver enzymes and the start of kidney failure. By Friday morning he was rushed to my hospital in acute renal and liver failure. He was bright dayglow orange (signs of both liver and kidney failure) and in incredible pain…..screaming and thrashing around. We never ID the mushroom though his family said it was pure white, leaving some to surmise amanita phalloides (also known as the “destroying angel”),,,though that mushroom is not native to the US but has been found in Maryland and the west coast. In any case the poor guy died screaming by Friday afternoon waiting for a liver transplant. (In 35 years of treating patients this was the only fatal case of mushroom poisoning I ever tried to treat. (Most just make you sick as a dog, doing some liver damage and just wishing you were dead. Unless you are sure leave it alone) IF you are serious about mushroom picking utube has a great lady “Yellow Elanor” who explains mushroom identification in detail and watch this and other videos she makes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sylVme-EfA This is worth your time and can save your life (please ignore this message if I am in the will!) ID’ing mushrooms is way too important to take anybody’s advice on this site especially if it’s prefaced with “I think” or “Could be” I love mushrooms and pick some on my farm BUT, When I was in college I asked my pharmacognosy professor about how to ID mushrooms. The short answer was “Find a “stada Baba Polock” ( Old peasant grandmother from Poland) “She knows the stuff better than me. His longer answer was” Pick three or four species that you CAN”T be mistaken for anything but edible. You need a book and a loop or magnifying glass when you go out there. I like mushrooms so I make sure of my species before Taking them home.” And as an old marine sergeant once told me,,,,”Don’t be too stupid to live”. Both of these advices hold especially true for mushroom pickers. I pick only a few species that I cannot mistake for anything but edible and can eat them with great confidence. Around 2001 We had a long-time mushroom picker consumed some white mushrooms he picked at a state park on a Sunday morning ate them that evening. He was sick a few hours later, went to the local hospital treated, felt fine and was released that evening. On Wednesday he started to feel ill and returned to the hospital. Lab results showed meteoric rise in liver enzymes and the start of kidney failure. By Friday morning he was rushed to my hospital in acute renal and liver failure. He was bright dayglow orange (signs of both liver and kidney failure) and in incredible pain…..screaming and thrashing around. We never ID the mushroom though his family said it was pure white, leaving some to surmise amanita phalloides (also known as the “destroying angel”),,,though that mushroom is not native to the US but has been found in Maryland and the west coast. In any case the poor guy died screaming by Friday afternoon waiting for a liver transplant. (In 35 years of treating patients this was the only fatal case of mushroom poisoning I ever tried to treat. (Most just make you sick as a dog, doing some liver damage and just wishing you were dead. Unless you are sure leave it alone) IF you are serious about mushroom picking utube has a great lady “Yellow Elanor” who explains mushroom identification in detail and watch this and other videos she makes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sylVme-EfA This is worth your time and can save your life (please ignore this message if I am in the will!) ID’ing mushrooms is way too important to take anybody’s advice on this site especially if it’s prefaced with “I think” or “Could be” I love mushrooms and pick some on my farm BUT, When I was in college I asked my pharmacognosy professor about how to ID mushrooms. The short answer was “Find a “stada Baba Polock” ( Old peasant grandmother from Poland) “She knows the stuff better than me. His longer answer was” Pick three or four species that CAN”T be mistaken for anything but edible. You need a book and a loop or magnifying glass when you go out there. I like mushrooms so I make sure of my species before Taking them home.” And as an old marine sergeant once told me,,,,”Don’t be too stupid to live”. Both of these advices hold especially true for mushroom pickers. I pick only a few species that I cannot mistake for anything but edible and can eat them with great confidence. Around 2001 We had a long-time mushroom picker consumed some white mushrooms he picked at a state park on a Sunday morning ate them that evening. He was sick a few hours later, went to the local hospital treated, felt fine and was released that evening. On Wednesday he started to feel ill and returned to the hospital. Lab results showed meteoric rise in liver enzymes and the start of kidney failure. By Friday morning he was rushed to my hospital in acute renal and liver failure. He was bright dayglow orange (signs of both liver and kidney failure) and in incredible pain…..screaming and thrashing around. We never ID the mushroom though his family said it was pure white, leaving some to surmise amanita phalloides (also known as the “destroying angel”),,,though that mushroom is not native to the US but has been found in Maryland and the west coast. In any case the poor guy died screaming by Friday afternoon waiting for a liver transplant. (In 35 years of treating patients this was the only fatal case of mushroom poisoning I ever tried to help treat. (Most just make you sick as a dog, doing some liver damage along the way and just wishing you were dead. AGAIN,Unless you are sure leave it alone) IF you are serious about mushroom picking utube has a great lady “Yellow Elanor” who explains mushroom identification in detail and watch this and other videos she makes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sylVme-EfA This is worth your time and can save your life (please ignore this message if I am in the will!) ID’ing mushrooms is way too important to take anybody’s advice on this site especially if it’s prefaced with “I think” or “Could be”
  10. Problem is the 4 acre cornfield was sprayed for corn Simazine,2-4 D, Dual Magnum. That prevents wheat soybean or clover to be grown for 4 months effectively preventing the replant scenario. Though with rain everyday I may get away with wheat as the herbicides are getting washed out. Its so wet I actually planted a rice hybrid (from Hancock seed) which supposedly grows in 70 days. We shall see. My gravel fields will grow if I plant but, its close to the road and I already get enough road kill without trying. I forgot to mention one of my treestands was destroyed when one of the storms ripped the 60in diameter willow into the ground. On the bright side, I wasn't in it.
  11. I’ve been playing farmer for 20+ years and for the most part have had great returns…until this year. This year has been a total disaster since the New Year. · It was a cold wet winter leaving my fields wet and sloppy. It wasn’t just the weather as beavers moved in blocking 2 culverts, thus making a series of shallow lakes on my property instead of fields. They also made a 4-acre pond out of some of the best deer/rabbit habitat I have. ( Yes I get a permit to destroy the beavers/dams/everything but I am not there 24/7 but they are) · I had to replace 1 culvert pipe entirely. · The cold spring kept my fields too wet to plant but geese and ducks enjoyed it. I’ve been playing farmer for 20+ years and for the most part have had great returns…until this year. This year has been a total disaster since the New Year. · It was a cold wet winter leaving my fields wet and sloppy. It wasn’t just the weather as beavers moved in blocking 2 culverts, thus making a series of shallow lakes on my property instead of fields. They also made a 4-acre pond out of some of the best deer/rabbit habitat I have. ( Yes I get a permit to destroy the beavers/dams/everything but I am not there 24/7 but they are) · I had to replace 1 culvert pipe entirely. · The cold spring kept my fields too wet to plant but geese and ducks enjoyed it. · MY 4wd 82hp- tractor broke down forcing me to delay planting the fields until my 2wd NH 3930 could get onto the fields without getting stuck · After draining everything (Backhoe and excavator needed) and planting corn and beans we had no rain for 4 weeks, stunting the growth leaving the fields severely deer damaged. I had to replant the corn and hoping the beans could make it. I had some quests over and sprayed my bee hives so their kids won't have to stay away from the hives.....exit 4 hives Who would suspect that would kill the colonies?? · We got rain and the crops started looking good UNTIL we had a severe but very localized grape size hail storm ( My neighbor’s video appeared on TV) that shredded the corn, all the beans and stripped about ½ the apple trees bare.. I replanted the beans. Again, the beans suffered bird (pigeons) and deer damage and I thought things were going good until the last 2 weeks of heavy rain. The fields are wet with standing water and I’ll be lucky to get some deer cover out of the corn. · The cereal rye grew great but it was too wet to combine. Now there is enough ergot mold growing to poison half the county or allowing enterprising organic chemists to make LSD for the masses. · My tractor is still in the shop, delaying other field work MY 4wd 82hp- tractor broke down forcing me to delay planting the fields until my 2wd NH 3930 could get onto the fields without getting stuck · After draining everything (Backhoe and excavator needed) and planting corn and beans we had no rain for 4 weeks, stunting the growth leaving the fields severely deer damaged. I had to replant the corn and hoping the beans could make it. · We got rain and the crops started looking good UNTIL we had a severe but very localized grape size hail storm ( My neighbor’s video appeared on TV) that shredded the corn, all the beans and stripped about ½ the apple trees bare.. I replanted the beans. Again, the beans suffered bird (pigeons) and deer damage and I thought things were going good until the last 2 weeks of heavy rain. The fields are wet with standing water and I’ll be lucky to get some deer cover out of the corn. · The cereal rye grew great but it was too wet to combine. Now there is enough ergot mold growing to poison half the county or allowing enterprising organic chemists to make LSD for the masses. · My tractor is still in the shop, delaying other field work So all in all it has been and still is an interesting year….and with our Governor hinting about more restrictions …..one can only hope for the best
  12. I hate, hate, hate digging. Home Depot and rent a small tractor w backhoe attachment or hire somebody.... now that's fast and easy and if you're over 55 it's reduces your risk of a heart attack. .....that makes it fast cheap and you'll be alive to enjoy the barn.
  13. Here's a pict from last month. I got weight estimates from 200 to 450 lbs. I like some comments on weight. LOL I just want it away from my chickens.
  14. Wheat is a grass and broad leaf weed killer will not bother the wheat just the broad leafs. Couple of years ago I did NOT use a weed killer on the field and it was so choked with weeds that the entire field was a loss. If you spray 2-4D or something like that the field will still be green but with the plants you want making harvest easy.
  15. why it lumber cost going up Many living and quite few dead folks voted often and repeatedly for the current administration. They want a wave of inflation (Just like Jimmy Carter's time) to make everybody dependent on our "leaders" Don't believe me? Just ask Chuck and Kirsten how better off we are now under their tutelage . It took Jimmy Carter his administration years to turn a nickel candy bar into a $1.75. These folks want to turn $1.85.g gas into $8.00/gallon and force us all into the cities where they can control everything we do. ...I retired because I would not tell my patient's that masks make a difference. Dissent will not be tolerated. The reason is...we are still buying the lumber at that price. Find a small local mill and you can still afford to build
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