LET EM GROW

Best 6mm(.243) bullet for deer??

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I have heard that the DRT thing, from a chest hit, has more to do with the time that the bullet arrives, than anything else.  If it strikes on the heart's power stroke, the system pressure overloads and it is "lights out" instantly.    If the bullet arrives on the heart's relaxed "intake" stroke, the animal will run until loss of blood flow to the brain, regardless of bullet type or caliber.

 

Untrue, drt is a disruption to the central nervous system either temporary or permanent. DRT with a chest hit with hitting a major bone it is a temporary disruption of central nervous system, by the the time it comes back they’ve died from exsanguination.

 

 

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18 minutes ago, Buckmaster7600 said:

Untrue, drt is a disruption to the central nervous system either temporary or permanent. DRT with a chest hit without hitting a major bone it is a temporary disruption of central nervous system, by the the time it comes back they’ve died from exsanguination.

 

 

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never heard it put that way. Makes sense. and i agree the prior comment is untrue  

Edited by LET EM GROW

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40 minutes ago, Buckmaster7600 said:

Untrue, drt is a disruption to the central nervous system either temporary or permanent. DRT with a chest hit without hitting a major bone it is a temporary disruption of central nervous system, by the the time it comes back they’ve died from exsanguination.

 

 

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I will call opinion rather than fact based on my own observations.  Of the dozens that I have double lunged with 4/5 oz, 16 ga Remington sluggers, about 1/3  were DRT, while the others ran off, up to 150 yards.  It seems that arrival timing must have an effect.

The only way I would go along with that is if you would consider a rib to be a major bone.  If that is the case, then I could be talked into your argument.  That would be reinforced by my first Adirondack rifle buck which was definitely DRT from the centered, second last rib hit.

The open space between ribs is probably 2 times the rib covered area across the chest, which would also explain my shotgun chest hit DRT frequency

Edited by wolc123

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I will call opinion rather than fact based on my own observations.  Of the dozens that I have double lunged with 4/5 oz, 16 ga Remington sluggers, about 1/3  were DRT, while the others ran off, up to 150 yards.  It seems that arrival timing must have an effect.
The only way I would go along with that is if you would consider a rib to be a major bone.  If that is the case, then I could be talked into your argument.  That would be reinforced by my first Adirondack rifle buck which was definitely DRT from the centered, second last rib hit.
The open space between ribs is probably 2 times the rib covered area across the chest, which would also explain my shotgun chest hit DRT frequency

Although I’ve never saw any studies done on deer I’ve saw a lot of them on humans and that was the consensus so I wouldn’t call it opinion but you can cal it what you want.

A rib is a major bone because it’s directly attached to the spine.

In my experience the higher you hit on the rib and the further forward in the ribs the more likely to disrupt CNS resulting in DRT.


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53 minutes ago, Buckmaster7600 said:


Although I’ve never saw any studies done on deer I’ve saw a lot of them on humans and that was the consensus so I wouldn’t call it opinion but you can cal it what you want.

A rib is a major bone because it’s directly attached to the spine.

In my experience the higher you hit on the rib and the further forward in the ribs the more likely to disrupt CNS resulting in DRT.


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I can see both arguments (overpressure/timing vs bone hit) partially explaining the DRT's.  If it is strictly rib/bone hit,  then a higher percentage should result from a large diameter, like a 12 ga slug, or a 50 cal ML, compared to a .243 diameter rifle bullet.  If it is strictly an energy/overpressure deal, then the rifles would have an edge.  

My own center - fire rifle/whitetail chest hit experience is limited to just the two DRT's explained above, and both of those syruck bone (rib and neck/spine).  Dozens of combined shotgun and 50 cal ML chest hit kills have only ran about 1/3 DRT however, which more supports the arrival time argument.

Edited by wolc123

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So I could not find the ttsx, I picked up some 85 grTSX and 90 gr Nosler Tipped. both shooting moa or less.. What would you choose for deer between the 2?

I fine tuned for the TSX as i thought itd be a more solid bullet, and less explosive compared to the 90gr Nosler ballistic tip. Even though both could be shot with the same reticle with no issue to 200yrds or so.. . 

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So I could not find the ttsx, I picked up some 85 grTSX and 90 gr Nosler Tipped. both shooting moa or less.. What would you choose for deer between the 2?
I fine tuned for the TSX as i thought itd be a more solid bullet, and less explosive compared to the 90gr Nosler ballistic tip. Even though both could be shot with the same reticle with no issue to 200yrds or so.. . 

All things being equal shooting wise I’ll always go to copper but you can’t go wrong with either. Ballistic tips are my favorite cup and core bullet ever made.


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My mature doe died yesterday from a .243.   1 shot.  Nosler 90 gr BT.    It was a big fat doe,  she ran about 30-40 yards, because she was looking at me, and I shot her in the neck.    Anything more than .243 for deer is unnecessary.    My previous deer was also a .243.

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30 minutes ago, the blur said:

My mature doe died yesterday from a .243.   1 shot.  Nosler 90 gr BT.    It was a big fat doe,  she ran about 30-40 yards, because she was looking at me, and I shot her in the neck.    Anything more than .243 for deer is unnecessary.    My previous deer was also a .243.

Bigger calibers are not necessary, but are very handy for the less than ideal shot angles which frequently occur in hunting situations.  The .243 is best left to the extremely recoil shy folks. I think the deer search guy could verify that from at least one of his tracks this year.

Edited by wolc123

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