jperch

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About jperch

  • Rank
    New York Hunter

Extra Info

  • Hunting Location
    Cayuga/Oswego Counties
  • Hunting Gun
    Remington 870
  • HuntingNY.com
    google search

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  1. The hunters showed great restraint. (Politeness seems to be common with Canadians.) I'm not sure what the hunter harassment laws are there but I'm pretty sure that in NY this would be addressed by a DEC officer. It was nice of her to supply her name.
  2. Yes, box turtle. My turtle biologist friend said this was a "particularly handsome specimen". He also said there is a problem in NY with box turtles and the pet trade, people often release non-native box turtles into the wild.
  3. Or is it a bog turtle? I note the starburst pattern on the "scutes". The DEC has a nice description and pictures of native turtles: http://www1.dec.state.ny.us/docs/administration_pdf/turtles2.pdf I know a biologist who studies bog turtles, they have become endangered in NYS and reside in only a few areas that they try to keep secret. So Cynthia, you may have seen a fairly rare species! I sent him the picture, if I get a response I will post.
  4. I never saw one 10 years ago, now I see them on 3 different properties in different counties that I hunt. They are neat creatures but highly efficient predators. I saw one go up a tree after a squirrel in the woods behind my house, it didn't take very long.
  5. Sometimes the college bookstores have good programs for purchasing computers, your daughter might want to check that. Geneseo is a great school, I graduated from there many seasons ago. She will enjoy her time there, great faculty and environment. Personally, I have moved to Mac products as I have found them to be more stable. But, as others have noted, they are somewhat more expensive.
  6. I used to have a Troy Built that had an option of a cutting head for smallish brush. I weed whack around a pond and it did fairly well. Two years ago I bought a 4 cycle Husky from the local Lowe's. So much better performance and better design. I can't speak to longevity, the Troy Built was also 4 cycle and lasted about 8 years. The Husky does not have the option of a cutting head as far as I know but I have been completely satisfied so far. YRMV.
  7. Great job Cynthia and Bill! Your persistence has been rewarded. I learned a much better way to clean turkeys by watching this video years ago: You can easily get the thigh and leg meat without getting into turkey guts. It's an easy 10 minute process, no more plucking for me. As with other critters, the sooner you get to it, the easier to remove the skin. It's better for the end quality also of course.
  8. Here is my take on early morning vs late morning turkey hunting. You tend to hear more gobbling in the early morning. Today's educated turkeys are generally less willing to come a running into hen yelping after fly down as compared to 20 years ago. But I love being there, hearing the gobbling and watching the woods come alive. Can't beat it! These days I have more success early in the day by soft, soft calling in an attempt to coax the hens in, often dragging a gobbler in tow. Later in the day, after the hens have mostly ditched the toms, I pay more attention to the single gobble I hear. That is more likely to be a lonely gobbler and I'll cut the distance and call to him with some aggressive yelping. Once he responds to that once or twice, I shut the hell up and just pay attention. Just my opinion, but that is what has worked for me in recent years.
  9. I say sight in with light, cheap field grade loads but then confirm with a shot or two of your turkey hunting load. In my 870 Special Purpose I saw a small change in point of impact when I changed from the Winchester Supreme Elite (expensive and hard to find) to Winchester Longbeards. Then after a miss you'll be confident the cause was Operator Error! It is so important to know exactly where to aim, especially on close shots.
  10. Well, sound simply does not carry as far once the trees are leafed out. Depending on the wind, I can often hear a gobble from a mile away before leaf out; not so after leaf out. There may be a connection between overall warmth of spring and when hens nest, I am not sure. Since this would impact the nutrition available to the hens, this seems plausible.
  11. It's crucial to know exactly where your gun and the load you are using hit. For my turkey gun, an 870 with a turkey barrel, the point of impact changes with different loads. These days I try to set up in situations where I will have a very close shot - say 25 yards or less. I take head shots, yes I have clean missed two or three. I'm ok with that. Deep breath, squeeze.
  12. How do you say "woof, woof!" in spanish?
  13. All three hunters in my group use spitfires. As Rob said it is common that the blades have not deployed until after the spitfire has passed through the hide on the entrance side. The exit wound always shows that the blades are fully opened. For blood trailing purposes it is crucial to take shots where an exit hole is probable! We have had great success with spitfires, which is why we still use them.
  14. Agreed. Factor in the potential for rain in your area and coyote problems. But other than that my experience is the longer you can wait ( 8-10 hours perhaps) the better with gutshot deer. Maybe a different answer with a gun and snow on the ground.