turkeyfeathers

School me on this knob.

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This is a Bushnell Nitro now on my ML. Replacing Bushnell Elite 3200.  I don’t know how or what to use this ? I sighted in using up/ down left/ right just fine. Had side knob at 50 yards. Afraid to move it not knowing what it’s purpose is. 

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Edited by turkeyfeathers

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Understanding and Correcting Parallax

Parallax is one of the most misunderstood concepts among shooters. Many sportsmen think it merely has to do with bringing the reticle into focus on the object.

That is a byproduct of correctly adjusted parallax, but it does not explain the phenomenon nor will merely turning the ocular to bring the reticle into focus correct it. Parallax occurs when the target and reticle are on different planes within the scope.

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It is detectable when you move your head or eye around while looking through the scope and the reticle appears to move or swim around the object you at which you are aiming. This can cause the scope to be off target depending on how your eye aligns with the optic and lead to poorly placed or completely missed shots. What you need is for both reticle and target to be on the same focal plane.

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For many hunters shooting at ranges of 250 yards or less, parallax isn’t a concern. Most centerfire rifle scopes without parallax adjustment are set at 150 yards, which is fine for shots at distances under 250. Rimfire or pistol scopes are set at even less. But most scopes made for more long-range shooting do have a parallax adjustment, either as an adjustable ring on the objective lens or more commonly as an adjustable turret on the side of the scope.

To adjust a scope where parallax is an issue, adjust the parallax adjustment all the way to infinity. Then aim your rifle at a target set at a known distance, obtain a sight picture through the optic and adjust the knob or ring back until the reticle becomes clearer. Make it as crisp as you can here. Then, lift your cheek off the stock while still looking through the scope and move your eye around. Still see the crosshairs moving off target some when you do?

[https://olinblog]

Keep adjusting—slowly then checking, slowly then checking—until you can move your eye around a little while looking through the scope and the crosshairs of the reticle don’t move off the target, but rather stay crisp and centered right where they should.

Now your parallax should be set and you should be ready to shoot or hunt. Lock the adjustment in. You shouldn’t have to ever touch it again unless someone else has been shooting your gun or it has been dropped hard. Then you may want to at least check it.

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Crisw nailed it. I had to read and reread about parallax to get it. 

Edited by rob-c

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Just more confused now lol. I’ll put it back to 50 as that’s how I sighted it in as. Seemed to be just fine. From my understanding now if I don’t keep it at 50 my impact would be different ? Looks like a summer project to really figure it out. 
Thanks chrisw.  

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It’s pretty much just to focus the crosshairs at that distance. If the crosshairs look solid at 50 yards but then you aim at a target 200 yards away, the crosshairs could look blurry. Turn the knob to the 200 mark and it should make your crosshairs appear solid again. That’s my understanding of it. 

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"We should encourage rifle practice among schoolboys, and indeed among all classes, as well as in the military services by every means in our power. Thus, and not otherwise, may we be able to assist in preserving peace in the world. The first step – in the direction of preparation to avert war if possible, and to be fit for war if it should come – is to teach men to shoot!"


Semper Fi

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22 minutes ago, turkeyfeathers said:

Just more confused now lol. I’ll put it back to 50 as that’s how I sighted it in as. Seemed to be just fine. From my understanding now if I don’t keep it at 50 my impact would be different ? Looks like a summer project to really figure it out. 
Thanks chrisw.  

Why not just put it at the distance you are most likely to have a shot? Even though you sighted in at 50, you know that if you take a 100 yard shot, you will have x inches of drop, and/or you know what the different hashmark distances are. So don't necessarily tie yourself to 50 on the parrallax.

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Just now, goosifer said:

Why not just put it at the distance you are most likely to have a shot? Even though you sighted in at 50, you know that if you take a 100 yard shot, you will have x inches of drop, and/or you know what the different hashmark distances are. So don't necessarily tie yourself to 50 on the parrallax.

I had it on 50 yards but sighted in last few shots at 100 and money at that combination 

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The knob is simple.  Turn it to the number that corresponds to the distance you are shooting.  That gives you a clear picture of the target and reticle and removes any sighting error due to parallax.

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The dial does more than make the crosshairs more "crisp" but honestly unless you're doing long range work (over 300yds) it doesn't seem to apply. As mentioned in the article, scopes without the manual adjustment are factory preset. The dial is more for aligning the scope/target plane. It isn't easy to wrap your head around until you really think about it. Basically, if you put your crosshairs on a distant Target and leave the gun there but lift your head off of the stock and move your eye slightly around behind the scope, do the crosshairs pull off of the target? If they do then parallax adjustment is probably needed. Again though, it doesn't apply much to us woods hunters. If you're shooting well out to your max range without issues then I'd just lock it in and forget it.

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