Jump to content

Some old farm equipment


Recommended Posts

I just pulled these out of the edge of one of my fields this morning, the plow has a strange set up with the levers to control the wheels? Anyone have experience with this? 

20210410_154738.jpg

20210410_154743.jpg

20210410_154747.jpg

20210410_154758.jpg

20210410_154756.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a trip plow and the levers are used to control the depth.  It looks like the IH one that I had for a few years.   When you want the blades to lift, at the end of a row, you pull a rope, it trips, and the blades lift.

Then you turn around, with them supported by the wheels, and pull a rope so they trip again, and go back down when you get to your next row.  That plow was made for a non 3 point hitch tractor (most likely a Farmall H).  They work very well, and still fetch a good buck.

The disk looks like an 8 foot "drag" type.  Those also often work with a trip rope.  You pull that, then pull it forward or back it up to change the angle.  For transport, the gangs are straight, and at the steepest angle for deepest tillage.  On large plots, that style of disk is light years more efficient than a 3 point disk.  No implement has suffered worse from the 3 point hitch than the disk.

Most likely, the primary tractor on that farm was a Farmall H, which that disk is also perfectly sized for.  I use an old JD disk just like that for most of my plots, and a 6.5 ft 3 point one for smaller ones or when I need to road transport.  Both take the same power to pull, but the 3 point one takes double the fuel to get the job done (because it is narrower and it takes more passes to get the ground worked fine enough to plant).

 

 

Edited by wolc123
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, wolc123 said:

That is a trip plow and the levers are used to control the depth.  It looks like the IH one that I had for a few years.   When you want the blades to lift, at the end of a row, you pull a rope, it trips, and the blades lift.

Then you turn around, with them supported by the wheels, and pull a rope so they trip again, and go back down when you get to your next row.  That plow was made for a non 3 point hitch tractor (most likely a Farmall H).  They work very well, and still fetch a good buck.

The disk looks like an 8 foot "drag" type.  Those also often work with a trip rope.  You pull that, then pull it forward or back it up to change the angle.  For transport, the gangs are straight, and at the steepest angle for deepest tillage.  On large plots, that style of disk is light years more efficient than a 3 point disk.  No implement has suffered worse from the 3 point hitch than the disk.

Most likely, the primary tractor on that farm was a Farmall H, which that disk is also perfectly sized for.  I use an old JD disk just like that for most of my plots, and a 6.5 ft 3 point one for smaller ones or when I need to road transport.  Both take the same power to pull, but the 3 point one takes double the fuel to get the job done (because it is narrower and it takes more passes to get the ground worked fine enough to plant).

 

 

Awesome info thanks! I considered selling them but may hang onto them for when I get into plots more. I have a 8n and an international 434 to use right now. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, BigVal said:

Awesome info thanks! I considered selling them but may hang onto them for when I get into plots more. I have a 8n and an international 434 to use right now. 

It looks like the disk is in decent shape.  I don't see any broken blades and it looks like most of the cleaners are still there.  As long as you don't need to take those on the road, they work great.  

One tip I will give you is to always grease it after you finish using it (and before you use it the first time). That way, the fresh grease will protect the bearings when it is in storage and it will always be ready to go when you need it. They will take almost a full tube of grease.

Your 8n will handle that disk easily, I frequently use mine on my 8 footer.  I use my 43 hp 4wd tractor on it in the spring, for the first pass.  It is a bit undersized for that tractor, but the advantage of that is it lets you get the work done in less than ideal soil conditions (like a little too wet).

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
On 4/10/2021 at 4:01 PM, BigVal said:

I just pulled these out of the edge of one of my fields this morning, the plow has a strange set up with the levers to control the wheels? Anyone have experience with this? 

20210410_154738.jpg

20210410_154743.jpg

20210410_154747.jpg

20210410_154758.jpg

20210410_154756.jpg

Massy harris plow. You drop rear wheel and put other in furrow just made to plow level, I has same plow I used for years does a heck of a job, my wheels finally rotted out so I scrapped it but billboards were still good ,amazing you have both cutter on it, best sod plow I owned

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, G-Man said:

Massy harris plow. You drop rear wheel and put other in furrow just made to plow level, I has same plow I used for years does a heck of a job, my wheels finally rotted out so I scrapped it but billboards were still good ,amazing you have both cutter on it, best sod plow I owned

Had a feeling you'd know! Thanks 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The pull type disk is a keeper

. Nothing does a better job been looking for a 12 ft one myself.. 3 pt just are no where near effective

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, G-Man said:

The pull type disk is a keeper

. Nothing does a better job been looking for a 12 ft one myself.. 3 pt just are no where near effective

That is definitely true.  I have used 5 different pull-type disks. Each of them worked way better than the (2) 6 ft 3-points I have had.

My favorite is the 8 ft JD, which I still have. Ironically, that was also the cheapest.  It came with a wagon load of stuff (including a 3 and a 4 section drag), that I paid the guy $200 for, which was less than scrap value at the time.  

One of my favorite sights was that 6 ft 3-point Dearborn disk leaving my farm in the pickup of a very happy buyer, who gladly forked over $ 450 for it.  I had struggled with that for about 10 years.  It took so many passes, compared to my granddad's old 8 ft Bissel, and another that I borrowed from a neighbor, previously. 

My uncle, next door, had  an 8 ft IH pull-type, which also worked way better, as did my dad's 6 ft Bissel pull-type.  I only picked up the 6 ft Howse 3-point that I have now, because occasionally I need to do a job for a neighbor and that requires road transport.  It works a lot better with about 300 pounds of steel plate bolted to the frame, but still no where near as good as any of the pull-types.  

I also use the 3-point on very small plots (less than 1/4 acre).  As a general rule of thumb, a 3-point disk takes twice as many passes to achieve the same level of soil breakup and about 25 percent more horsepower per unit width to pull on each pass.

The 3-point hitch is great for lots of tools but definitely not a disk.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree , I have an 8 ft Gordon with a j bar float.on the 3 pt , works better than most 3pts but still sucks compared to pull type

Link to post
Share on other sites

I will be using my JD 8 ft pull-type over the next week, hopefully starting tomorrow.  No rain in the forecast for a while, and the soil temp should be plenty warm enough, after a few days in the 80's

  I would like to get a little "sacrificial" early sweetcorn in yet this week.  I have 70, 80, and 90 day varieties  (cappacino, bodacious, and silver queen).  Most of the first batch to get ripe always goes to the coons.  I usually get them before they get much of the next batch though.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Hello! The farmer organizes farming on the farm-begins to grow grain, livestock, or poultry. To run a business properly and make it profitable, he needs to master several specialties to grow crops or look after the herd and keep accounting records, hire employees, and sell the products received. Therefore, you will need a tractor for growing grain, but you will also need many things for everything else. You can contact agricultural equipment specialists to tell you what you can do with this tractor. To get started, you can order parts here and replace them on the old tractor so that it at least just works.

Edited by WilliamRH
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...