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Currently working for a company.love what i do but pay isnt all that great and feel as if i could do better.im sure alot of people feel the same but im open to see other opportunity's that may be out there.cnc is where its at but all i know of is manual machining.anyone know of any opportunity in the rochester ny area?

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Have you thought about a CNC training class ? Its really not hard to do ,of course there will be tricks you learn as you go but if an employer sees that you have knowledge of machining and have already taken a CNC course ,that will be enough to bring you in and train you further . Some employers like a clean slate ,ive talked to a few employers who hate hiring guys that are set in their ways and refuse to change to meet the companies already in place structure. This area isnt really known for paying top dollar for machinist , from the people i know , the area average is in the low 20/hour.

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Have contemplated that aswell.reasoning for looking is currently im cuttergrinding drills reamers endmills and various cutting tools etc etc.looking at other cuttergrind positions they are making atleast $4.00 an hr more than i am starting.i havent been cuttergrinding aslong as some guy but from what ive done im doing a swell job haha.also as u were saying.am willing to learn new things and not afraid of a challenge.

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I know of a shop in Phelps NY if your interested idk how pay is for machinists my dad is a lead man machinist there and I know if your willing to learn there is advancement opportunities

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24 years young.will be at the shop im currently at for 5 years in february.like said im willing aslong as it will work with travel distance and hours as me and g/f share 1 vehicle due to funds.

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Magnus precision manufacturing. Good company.  Not sure of their needs but worth a look. 


That's the shop I was talking about. Moog do you work there.. my dad and his best friend have been there 20 years ish

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45 minutes ago, stoneam2006 said:

 


That's the shop I was talking about. Moog do you work there.. my dad and his best friend have been there 20 years ish

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45 minutes ago, stoneam2006 said:

 


That's the shop I was talking about. Moog do you work there.. my dad and his best friend have been there 20 years ish

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk
 

 

I represent Magnus and it's sister companies, AIM and PCI.  The CEO of floturn, the parent corp in Cincy, is a great guy.  Ask your dad if he remembers the MMS 3.  It was designed to make Mossberg receivers.  Never worked right. I sued the manufacturer for Magnus.  The manufacturers lost and went belly up. That was my intro to the company. They are good people.  

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I represent Magnus and it's sister companies, AIM and PCI.  The CEO of floturn, the parent corp in Cincy, is a great guy.  Ask your dad if he remembers the MMS 3.  It was designed to make Mossberg receivers.  Never worked right. I sued the manufacturer for Magnus.  The manufacturers lost and went belly up. That was my intro to the company. They are good people.  


Lol he remembers it alright...said it was scrap metal lol

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12 hours ago, Jeremy K said:

Have you thought about a CNC training class ? Its really not hard to do ,of course there will be tricks you learn as you go but if an employer sees that you have knowledge of machining and have already taken a CNC course ,that will be enough to bring you in and train you further . Some employers like a clean slate ,ive talked to a few employers who hate hiring guys that are set in their ways and refuse to change to meet the companies already in place structure. This area isnt really known for paying top dollar for machinist , from the people i know , the area average is in the low 20/hour.

This is 100% on the button,I run part of a small shop here in Fulton and when we hire for the most part we want someone who hasn't been trained,in the same breath I find it next to impossible to hire someone who has experience that's worth hiring.Id say get some CNC experience and take notes on what to do

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Not sure if this exactly what you're looking for but there's Bennett Manufacturing in Alden ,NY  It's a stones throw from Batavia .. Figured  it couldn't hurt to mention it.

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17 hours ago, Jeremy K said:

Have you thought about a CNC training class ? Its really not hard to do ,of course there will be tricks you learn as you go but if an employer sees that you have knowledge of machining and have already taken a CNC course ,that will be enough to bring you in and train you further . Some employers like a clean slate ,ive talked to a few employers who hate hiring guys that are set in their ways and refuse to change to meet the companies already in place structure. This area isnt really known for paying top dollar for machinist , from the people i know , the area average is in the low 20/hour.

 

We just filled a couple apprenticeships for tool and die makers, here in Palmyra. Tool and die is where its at. I love it. We run CNC, manuals, etc.. all of it. Whatever the company needs we build. Idk of anyone hiring, off the top of my head but we work with many outside vendors, i could ask around. We are not hiring right now but will be in a year or two when couple guys retire or if something happens before hand to fill their positions.., We would much rather have someone with great common sense and some mechanical aptitude, we can train ourselves... rather than gods greatest gift.. lol More fun too  

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As others have said get some CNC training. You now have an advantage over someone Just out of School. You have hands on experiance in machining. I was a machinist for over 30+ years when the company I worked for decided to get a CNC Lathe and A CNC Mill. At that time 3 axis. I new nothing about and did not own a computer, they sent us to school on both machines. From then on I set up , proghramed and ran both machines + some of the old manual machinery.

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As previously said cnc is where its at now.can see that by the reponses haha.think its going to be my best route.i started from scratch not knowing a thing walking in the door.my father took tool and die shop in boces and has been doing it sence.so he got me started in it.started running saws looking at prints.lathe work,milling,quality control and now sharpening/cuttergrinding cutting tools of high speed and carbide.will deff look into cnc.thank you guys!

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18 minutes ago, doebuck1234 said:

As previously said cnc is where its at now.can see that by the reponses haha.think its going to be my best route.i started from scratch not knowing a thing walking in the door.my father took tool and die shop in boces and has been doing it sence.so he got me started in it.started running saws looking at prints.lathe work,milling,quality control and now sharpening/cuttergrinding cutting tools of high speed and carbide.will deff look into cnc.thank you guys!

Don't put all your eggs in one basket. Don't become a specialist, I started out as a machinist 22 years ago,after the first 5 of manual lathe and mills ,I went on to start an apprenticeship as a mold maker . I have since been employed in the auto industry as a die maker for the last 2.5 years. The time I spent as a mold maker was still the highlight of my career. You learn grinders,lathe,mill,edm,cnc,cad cam,programming. The real fun begins once you become proficient at all them . Good luck with your future endeavors.

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