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A few years ago, my wife and I hiked down the Rio Grande gorge in Taos on Christmas Day in search of cutbows. The down wasn't bad, but it starting snowing when were fishing and we hiked up and out in

In case anyone is wondering, we're talking about the Ken Lockwood Gorge in NJ.  There are NO river gorges in NY with trout. None at all. Just keep driving. 

My best day fly fishing for steelhead was New Year's Day a while back. 55 degrees and we hammered them. A couple browns in the mix too Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

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  • 2 months later...
Fall/winter fly fishing can be very much fun, I fish steelhead on the fly in the winter. Challenging, yes, but on a nice sunny day alone on the river can be rewarding.
Don't pack that rod away until spring..... 

My best day fly fishing for steelhead was New Year's Day a while back. 55 degrees and we hammered them. A couple browns in the mix too


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3 hours ago, The_Real_TCIII said:


My best day fly fishing for steelhead was New Year's Day a while back. 55 degrees and we hammered them. A couple browns in the mix too
 

Nice, I've also endured days where the rod guides continually freeze up....all in a day's fishing !!    

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I've caught a trout or salmon every month of the year in the tributaries of cayuga lake. The king salmon pictured if from Ontario.  Nymphing is the most productive for me but marabou streamers can be fantastic if the conditions are right. This is great to eat and fun to catch.

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12 minutes ago, left field said:

A few years ago, my wife and I hiked down the Rio Grande gorge in Taos on Christmas Day in search of cutbows. The down wasn't bad, but it starting snowing when were fishing and we hiked up and out in a blizzard. Not fun.

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You are married to that pretty young thing  ?? Why you dirty old man !! You must have lots of money....

JK, Partner...Hehehe..

Back in '95 I  was bowhunting elk in the Gila Wilderness in NM..Filled my tag early and spent a couple of days flyfishing the Gila  for trout...It was Sept,, so no snow, but still quite a hike to get down to th river and back up....

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I realize this is an older post but fly fishing means you need to understand insects and their life stages. You asked if the “flies are the same”. Answer no although some might mimic other species or stages as well. 
I say stages as often fish key in on one particular stage. You can tell the way they’re taking flies. 
Streamers as stated would actually work and nymphs def would too. There’s the actual type that are in the water your fishing as well as just general impressionistic/flashy type. 
One piece of advice to help you, learn the local flies and match that. The stages take a little bit of figuring. 
It should be stated sometimes different insects might be visible, it’s up to you to figure which one they want and what stage. That’s important.  There’s always terrestrials. Often the best in times of inactivity. 
Now here’s another point, water temp matters. Think about why/what. I’ll give you an easy for instance. There’s a spot near me often in March early brown stones start flying all over. I’ve even seen them active in some snow. The best fishing tends to be pretty shallow, flat, sun filled pools. They warm quickest. During mid summer you might not fish there. Ugh one more thing. The insects are in certain water types. You need to know that too. Certain species of say caddis would only hatch in a rif. Green drakes like a softer slower bottom. You need to be there when they’re active with the proper fly/stage fly. 
Mayflies mate and die. They become spent spinners. You’re not fishing them in fast water. 
Sorry to give you more than you asked but when you inquired about the “same flies” I realized you’re a little inexperienced. Fly fishing is really involved. 
Call a local fly shop, they often have water temps, a list of current local hatches or flies and should steer you right to start. They’ll also most likely have the gear you’d need at the store. 
Hope that helps

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39 minutes ago, Pygmy said:

You are married to that pretty young thing  ?? Why you dirty old man !! You must have lots of money....

JK, Partner...Hehehe..

Back in '95 I  was bowhunting elk in the Gila Wilderness in NM..Filled my tag early and spent a couple of days flyfishing the Gila  for trout...It was Sept,, so no snow, but still quite a hike to get down to th river and back up....

She's a trooper. Spent another Christmas Day floating a river in Argentina.

Did you catch a Gila Trout? Pretty rare fish.

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I found out the other day they do a fall stocking here on long island,but to late we have hard water now[learning the terms!!!!]  I'll be out of the work force and out of here[LI] for good this time next year then it's on fulltime hunting,fishing and shooting.

looking forward to the spring to try and get my first trout on the fly.

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Isn’t there an open steam nearby? You’d be surprised at how active the fish could be especially if we get a warm spell and you key in on warmest water. 
By Feb/March the snow flies I mentioned (early black stones) will be active. Fish will rise to them and skittering a fly down and across is a pretty deadly technique. An elk or deer hair caddis would be great for that. Get one relatively heavily palmered as it only needs be impressionistic. Make sure size is close. 

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On 12/18/2020 at 8:01 PM, left field said:

She's a trooper. Spent another Christmas Day floating a river in Argentina.

Did you catch a Gila Trout? Pretty rare fish.

Nope....Just some rainbows which I cooked for for lunch along the river....

Lots of trout, but low, clear water...If you spooked a fish at the bottom of the pool, he'd head upstream and spook the entire pool..

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Isn’t there an open steam nearby? You’d be surprised at how active the fish could be especially if we get a warm spell and you key in on warmest water. 
By Feb/March the snow flies I mentioned (early black stones) will be active. Fish will rise to them and skittering a fly down and across is a pretty deadly technique. An elk or deer hair caddis would be great for that. Get one relatively heavily palmered as it only needs be impressionistic. Make sure size is close. 

My friend hammered em yesterday, winter fishing is a blast.


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  • 2 months later...
Can be great, depending on watershed. Trout typically eat subsurface in the fall, so nymphs and wet flies.In the Catskills, the browns are moving and spawning though it's considered bad form to target spawning fish.
Here's a quick breakdown on what's happening: https://detteflies.com/pages/daily-fishing-report

That’s a great fly shop btw


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I met Winnie Dettie back in the late 80s early 90s. Nice woman . Marry is a a great gal very knowledgeable. Joe is a heck of a tyer. Mary gave me a quick lesson on how to tie their coffen fly to the correct proportions. New shop is in Livingston Manor . Was at the new shop for the first time last spring . Couldn't go in do to covid.

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Oldest family-run fly shop in the country.
This book is worth a read:
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Thanks for posting this I like reading books about NY hunting and fishing. I’ll be picking this one up soon


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You'll enjoy it. Along the same lines is Ed's book:

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While on the surface it's a book focussed on trout fishing, it really operates as a history of the Catskills. Fascinating book.

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I read one on the Neversink many moons ago...not sure of author but will have to look for it. really interesting as this guy was trying to bolster the carry over population and spent a fortune to just get washed out again and again.


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