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winter rye where to find it for sale

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So I was after doing a little research I was thinking of top seeding my oats in the end of september with some winter rye/ rye grain as Im told it last long into the colder month where oats commonly die on the first hard frost but where can I find Just plain Winter rye/ rye grain found a few places on-line but shipping 50lbs cost more then the bag of seed

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CNY, Northen Madison Co, Im going to call Tully Agway Tmrw other then that its the only place i can think of that may have it

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Years ago I used winter rye (AKA "Green Manure") every year to improve my soil.  That was years ago and I always purchased it at Agway.  

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Tully Agway will probably have it.  So will The Baldwinsville Farmers Co-op and the Farm Supply in Deruyter (can’t remember the name I don’ think it is Agway)

 

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I'm  back to winter wheat. Rye seed is 2/3rd higher in cost and winter kills here. Could have been due to the wet Spring we had here. Had wheat over on poorer drained soil and it did well with surface drainage.

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They have it for 11$ a 50# bag at country crossroads in Andover currently. Rye will stay green into the dead of winter.. and be the first to green up in spring along with most white clovers. If your into no till, it has a higher carbon content, meaning it wont break down as fast like oats or wheat will. Helping your organic matter and moisture

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12 hours ago, landtracdeerhunter said:

I'm  back to winter wheat. Rye seed is 2/3rd higher in cost and winter kills here. Could have been due to the wet Spring we had here. Had wheat over on poorer drained soil and it did well with surface drainage.

I also prefer winter wheat over rye, because it is cheaper and easier to find, but mostly because the deer like it better. It looks like we are in for a long dry spell now.   As soon as I see some rain in the forecast, I am going to get in a couple plots of a wheat/soybean/white clover mix.    Those late-summer/early fall soybeans are the ticket to get the deer using the plots right away, and into early bow season, if we don't get an early frost.  The wheat should hold them there until late ML season.  

I am hoping that my ace-in-the hole at that time will be the purple-top turnips.  I planted those on about 1/4 of each of those plots already, one two weeks ago and the other last weekend.  The two week stuff is up a few inches already.  I hope it does ok thru the predicted dry stretch that we are just now getting into.  I fertilized them heavy and seeded them lightly so they should have a decent chance.          

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I use Winter Rye every year, and it works great for me. The last few years Ive been planting it along with Ladino clover to get my clover plots started in the fall. The deer love it, and so do the turkeys during early summer when the heads pop out. Ill be planting some next week where I am expanding my current clover plot. It also works great if you have a failure in an earlier planted plot. Stuff grows on everything, Ive had it grow in my shoes that I wore while planting it, the frame rails of my ATV and the bed of my truck. The fact that its cheap helps as well.

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True that the winter rye when dies emits heavy nitrogen thus helping the clover ? Following year clover will thrive even better.  I planted a few patchy spots of throw and grow in some hard woods. Appears the grasses/ rye are sprouting well and not much clover ( but bag lists only 5% clover or so ) 

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2 hours ago, turkeyfeathers said:

True that the winter rye when dies emits heavy nitrogen thus helping the clover ? Following year clover will thrive even better.  I planted a few patchy spots of throw and grow in some hard woods. Appears the grasses/ rye are sprouting well and not much clover ( but bag lists only 5% clover or so ) 

Im not 100% on the nitrogen, but it makes a great cover crop and allows the clover to grow with less browsing pressure when its small. I have generally found that when planted in the fall along with WR, Ladino really starts to come through the following year.

Heres what I found with a quick search on an Ag site:

C. Cover and green manure crop:

Fall sown rye holds more snow and rainfall than does a bare field. It also preserves soil moisture in the spring, since there is no spring seedbed preparation. It provides fall, winter, and spring soil cover when the potential for wind and water erosion losses are substantial in plowed fields. Rye as a cover crop fits well into many erosion control programs. Land going into potatoes, soybean, or corn can be protected over winter by a rye cover crop. Rye can be also used as an emergency cover to fill gaps between other crops, or if a crop is removed early because of failure, rye can be seeded to protect the soil until time to plant the next crop. It can also be used as a winter cover crop for continuous minimum tillage corn when the corn crop is harvested early. When corn or soybean are sod-planted, rye can be seeded in the fall and then killed with herbicides prior to planting. Rye should not be grown between crops of wheat or barley, unless it is completely killed before wheat or barley are planted in the spring.

As a green manure crop, rye is particularly suitable because of its winter hardiness and its rapid growth early in the spring. It should be plowed or disked when about 20 in. tall.

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Cereal Rye is high in Carbon, which take sit longer than other grains, to break down and decompose. Thus making it s long term slow release natural fertilizer. Germinates down to around 36 degrees, and will grow some after as well. Stays green longer into winter and is first green in Spring. Grows anywhere basically. And while actively growing, is a great nurse crop to a perennial blend. 

The high carbon content make sit a huge Win for the guys doing no till plantings. Add it into blends to plant for the following planting season.. ITs used as a terminating crop... and again takes a long while to break down and decompose as mentioned above  

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Can you use winter rye as a throw and grow? I've got a area I'd like to plant something but cant get a tiller or anything to it

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1 hour ago, Team Hoyt said:

Can you use winter rye as a throw and grow? I've got a area I'd like to plant something but cant get a tiller or anything to it

Well, throw and grow is a bit of a farce IMO, you still need seed to soil contact. Scratch the surface with a rock rake or something and toss it down. It will grow.

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16 minutes ago, WNYBuckHunter said:

Well, throw and grow is a bit of a farce IMO, you still need seed to soil contact. Scratch the surface with a rock rake or something and toss it down. It will grow.

Thanks

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So I picked up the seed and did a little trial run threw about 100 seeds on a bare patch I had on my lawn , obviously lots of rain but in about 24hrs the seeds were starting to germinate small little white root coming out of them, plan on putting some out on the 24th then some mid september.

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Fertilizer for winter rye?


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"The sportsman lives his life vicariously. For he secretly yearns to have lived before, in a simpler time. A time when his love for the land, water, fish and wildlife would be more than just part of his life. It would be his state of mind."

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im not using any fertilizer on it , soil test looked good but im guessing it wouldnt hurt anything if u did

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