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If he is smart he will build a smoker and jerk it. That should preserve it fine, especially since cold temps are coming. I would jerk it and then rehydrate during cooking like in a soup. 



I thought he was building a smoker when he got back with the meat. That drying rack thing he made I can’t remember what he called it. But he should put walls and a roof on it and use it as a smoker if he’s smart.

But your right, smoke the big chunks then get to slicing and jerk almost all of it and he should be able to hold out on that for quite awhile.

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35 minutes ago, Adkhunter1590 said:

 

I thought he was building a smoker when he got back with the meat. That drying rack thing he made I can’t remember what he called it. But he should put walls and a roof on it and use it as a smoker if he’s smart.

But your right, smoke the big chunks then get to slicing and jerk almost all of it and he should be able to hold out on that for quite awhile.

 

 

I can't remember the name of the old recipe they use to make. It was native American I think. They rendered the fat of the animals to preserve that and mixed in jerked meat. That kept their fat intake up and avoided protein poisoning. I think they even mixed in nuts and berries as well. 

I haven't seen the new episode yet. The last show I saw cut out as he was drawing his bow after seeing the moose. 


"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote." -- Benjamin Franklin

"The trouble with Socialism is, sooner or later you run out of other people's money." - Margaret Thatcher

"When you subsidize poverty and failure, you get more of both.." - James Dale Davidson, National Taxpayers Union

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11 minutes ago, Culvercreek hunt club said:

I can't remember the name of the old recipe they use to make. It was native American I think. They rendered the fat of the animals to preserve that and mixed in jerked meat. That kept their fat intake up and avoided protein poisoning. I think they even mixed in nuts and berries as well. 

I haven't seen the new episode yet. The last show I saw cut out as he was drawing his bow after seeing the moose. 

Pemmican... doesn't sound too good, but I can see how it would stay preserved and keep them alive

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Stupid question and I should probably just look it up, but how does smoking work? Does it cook the meat through or just seal/preserve the outside? 

And what do you guys mean by "jerk"? The only jerk I know is the fine fine chicken I had on a beach in Negril and Alan Meigs in the 8th grade.  

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"With all that's at stake, the day shown on episode 5 of Alone was one of the most intense I have had. Here is the detailed description of what went down.

After last week's miss I built the reindeer fence. Early warning systems adjusted to have lighter breakpoints (to avoid startling the moose like the last one) had been placed around to give me a heads up. While checking my traps I heard a commotion in the area (my face in this moment was captured in episode 4 ). I quickly snuck over to my bush located at the mouth of the fence. After a short wait the young bull appeared quartering towards me and moving along the fence. I may of been able to wait and get a full broadside shot, but he was within 20 yards and often waiting means you will get no shot, so I took my shot! It felt like a great shot and as it struck him he spun around in a circle not immediately running away and not knowing what happened. I stared in awe at him for a second then thought "what an idiot shoot another arrow!". Just as I tried he trotted off, my second arrow sailed into the Moss.

But the shot felt good! I wish it had been a few inches to the left which would of guaranteed a double lung hit, but I had been encouraged by a moose cough and a bubbly splatter of blood. The next hour felt like an eternity, but from prior experience I know it's best to wait an hour or so before beginning your search.

I found a good trail of blood but it slowly dried up....and soon I could find no tracks or blood. Knowing I hit him in the lung, and that running uphill would be the last thing he would want to do I followed the shoreline. All the thoughts of "oh man, did it get away?" Swarming around in my head. Then I spotted some brown - and saw him move! I couldn't believe it, I was so excited to see him lying up there, but that was just the beginning. I immediately I ducked down behind a log. You want the animal to be calm, to not know what happened, and to slowly bleed out without fear and adrenaline. If he were to see me he would of gotten an energy burst and could well of ran off or charged. I really couldn't risk it. I wanted so badly to finish it off, but the risk of me losing the animal completely and leaving it die in vain was too great. Finally (on video) it stood up, I gasped, he fell over, and died. I walked up to it and confirmed it. That was pure joy. 

So intense. 

The skinning and hauling never felt like too much of a burden...problems I was more than happy to take on! Of course it's exhausting, and that is why, in a short lapse in judgement, I hit the stomach with my blade. I was foolishly trying to avoid rolling him into his back again to open up his chest cavity (which I ended up doing anyway).

I then had it back at camp where I hung the main quarters in my shelter to smoke as I sat there and cut other strips off the neck and such to smoke in small pieces also (get as much smoke on as much meat as possible to get it to freezing temps). Other parts I hung up in trees to keep away from predators, though not high enough to keep our of the reach of bears. I figured if one came he would go for that lower hanging meat before he went for the smoky human scented shelter meat, and that I may even get a chance at him! But all that is for the future, we'll see how it goes down."
 

 

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4 hours ago, moog5050 said:

Stupid question, but doesn't one need a lot of salt to preserve 800lbs of meat?  Is that available to this guy?  Good score regardless I just wonder how much of the meat will rot before it can be used.  Or is it cold enough not to worry.  Haven't really been watching.

I've never seen the show, but sounds like from this thread the folks are in cold weather area? Sub Arctic maybe?

Anyway; cold and hot environments can be actually easier to preserve meat and can have one thing in common.....dry environments ( think about how low the humidity gets in really cold weather even here in NY).

Actually there is a good example of Alton Brown (food network) making jerky not with warm, but laying his strips on a box fan.

Yes salt speeds up the process, and by drying fast reduces potential bacteria, but if conditions are right is not necessary to produce dried meat even without salt or salt type preservatives like sodium nitrates or nitrites.

 

This is 2 mens work overnight on the start of drying about 2 TONS (4000 lbs) of meat off one animal in 80* nights and 105* days; maybe about one quarter that they processed over the next 3 days. BUT area hasn't seen rain in 7 months and extremely low humidity levels. Next to no insect life present. No salt required.....reconstituted in water like a stew in the end and stored in burlap sacks in the rafters.

qrFjC3P.jpg

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LBe5Pil.jpg?1

Most pieces about the size of a thumb, 2-4 feet long and draped over wire. 

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Give it a name, apply human sentiment, and its no longer a wild animal its a Disney character.

 

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Cold smoking of the large pieces or anything actually, raises the acidity of the surface and bacteria growth is limited. When I said “jerk” I was speaking of a dehydration process without cooking.

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"Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote." -- Benjamin Franklin

"The trouble with Socialism is, sooner or later you run out of other people's money." - Margaret Thatcher

"When you subsidize poverty and failure, you get more of both.." - James Dale Davidson, National Taxpayers Union

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15 minutes ago, Dinsdale said:

I've never seen the show, but sounds like from this thread the folks are in cold weather area? Sub Arctic maybe?

Anyway; cold and hot environments can be actually easier to preserve meat and can have one thing in common.....dry environments ( think about how low the humidity gets in really cold weather even here in NY).

Actually there is a good example of Alton Brown (food network) making jerky not with warm, but laying his strips on a box fan.

Yes salt speeds up the process, and by drying fast reduces potential bacteria, but if conditions are right is not necessary to produce dried meat even without salt or salt type preservatives like sodium nitrates or nitrites.

 

This is 2 mens work overnight on the start of drying about 2 TONS (4000 lbs) of meat off one animal in 80* nights and 105* days; maybe about one quarter that they processed over the next 3 days. BUT area hasn't seen rain in 7 months and extremely low humidity levels. Next to no insect life present. No salt required.....reconstituted in water like a stew in the end and stored in burlap sacks in the rafters.

qrFjC3P.jpg

I6KCyoO.jpg?1

LBe5Pil.jpg?1

Most pieces about the size of a thumb, 2-4 feet long and draped over wire. 

4000lbs - elephant?

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9 minutes ago, moog5050 said:

4000lbs - elephant?

yes

Interesting is that the rumen of a buffalo was highly prized and heavy salted, but I think that had more to do with texture and flavor then preserving. Rest of the buffalo hung like this, just meat. 

I do beef biltong in the winter by hanging on my porch on "nice days" just above freezing. Some spices, mostly coriander, and dipped in a vinegar wash quick. Like a soft jerky with moist core and very  little salt. Same idea, dry by relative humidity. 

Trying to find some caribou pics of the meat we dried in a very northern camp to add. But can't find the hard drive they are on. I'll post when I figure where the #$%^ I put them.:rolleyes:


Give it a name, apply human sentiment, and its no longer a wild animal its a Disney character.

 

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To bad you can't just hunt and fish when you want I would like to and see how long i could last just living off the land like that .  If anything it be a great way to lose some weight I bet lol 

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42 minutes ago, Dinsdale said:

yes

Interesting is that the rumen of a buffalo was highly prized and heavy salted, but I think that had more to do with texture and flavor then preserving. Rest of the buffalo hung like this, just meat. 

I do beef biltong in the winter by hanging on my porch on "nice days" just above freezing. Some spices, mostly coriander, and dipped in a vinegar wash quick. Like a soft jerky with moist core and very  little salt. Same idea, dry by relative humidity. 

Trying to find some caribou pics of the meat we dried in a very northern camp to add. But can't find the hard drive they are on. I'll post when I figure where the #$%^ I put them.:rolleyes:

And I thought only us Italians could stomach stomach.   Lol

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Anyone watching tonight i dont understand how you catch your shelter on fire no shit its going to catch fire when you have your shelter built over the top of it put some mud or something on it 

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