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12 minutes ago, The_Real_TCIII said:

Im vaccinated and am doing no such thing. Nor did I before the vaccine existed

I’m talking about the people who got the vaccine yet still think they’re in some mortal danger. I like to refer to them as conspiracy theorists.  Nothing backs up they’re irrational fears.

 

im vaxxed as well fyi.  

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30 minutes ago, diplomat019 said:

I’m talking about the people who got the vaccine yet still think they’re in some mortal danger. I like to refer to them as conspiracy theorists.  Nothing backs up they’re irrational fears.

 

im vaxxed as well fyi.  

I was just playing devils advocate. And besides, even if their fears are rational, the vaccine status of the person next to them has no bearing on the situation.

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NYT-Headers-N-TheMorning%402x.png

October 8, 2021

 

Author Headshot

By David Leonhardt

     

 

Good morning. When we treat Covid as a simple morality play, we can end up making bad predictions.

 

 
 
 

 

08-the-morning-NL-lede-articleLarge-v2.jpg

University of Florida football fans at the Alabama game last month.Phelan M. Ebenhack/Associated Press

The September swoon

 

In the final weeks of this summer, with Covid-19 cases soaring and the rituals of autumn about to resume, many people assumed that the pandemic was on the verge of getting even worse.

Children were returning to classrooms five days a week. Broadway was reopening, and movie fans were heading to theaters again. In football stadiums across the country, fans were crowding together, usually unmasked, to cheer, sing and drink.

 

Given all of this — and the Delta variant — public discussion had a decidedly grim tone as the summer wound down. “It may only get worse,” read a Politico headline. “The new school year is already a disaster,” Business Insider reported.

The Washington Post cited an estimate that daily caseloads in the U.S. could reach 300,000 in August, higher than ever before. An expert quoted in The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette suggested the number could be higher yet. In The New York Times, an epidemiologist predicted that cases would rise in September because children were going back to school.

 

And what actually happened? Cases plunged.

08-MORNING-COVID-CASE-CHART-articleLarge-v2.png

Chart shows the 7-day daily average.The New York Times

 

The best measure of U.S. cases (a seven-day average, adjusted for holiday anomalies) peaked around 166,000 on Sept. 1 — the very day that seemed to augur a new surge. The number of new daily cases has since fallen almost 40 percent. Hospitalizations are down about 30 percent. Deaths, which typically change direction a few weeks after cases, have declined 13 percent since Sept. 20.

To be fair, forecasting a pandemic is inherently difficult. Virtually all of us, expert and not, have at times been surprised by Covid and incorrect about what was likely to happen next. It’s unavoidable.

 

But there is a pattern to some of the recent mistakes, and understanding it can help us avoid repeating them.

Clutch chokers

 

Let’s start by recalling a near-universal human trait: People are attracted to stories with heroes and villains. In these stories, the character flaws of the villains bring them down, allowing the decency of the heroes to triumph. The stories create a clear relationship between cause and effect. They make sense.

Books, television shows and movies are full of such stories. But for the purposes of understanding Covid, another form of mass entertainment — sports — is more useful.

 

Unlike novels or movies, sporting events involve true uncertainty. They are not part of a fictional world, with an author’s predetermined ending. And as is the case with more important subjects, like a pandemic, sports are subject to a lot of predictions. For these reasons, social scientists, including Nobel laureates, sometimes study sports to learn lessons about the human mind.

If you turn on almost any sporting event, you will hear tales of heroes and villains. Sports broadcasters often use moralistic language — with concepts like “clutch” and “choke” — to explain outcomes. The broadcasters turn games into “referenda on character,” as Joe Sheehan, who writes an excellent baseball newsletter, has put it. The athletes with strong character win, and the weak lose.

 

But anybody who watches sports for long enough will notice that these morality plays do not age well. Many athletes or coaches whom broadcasters long described as chokers (Clayton Kershaw, Andy Reid, Phil Mickelson, Alex Rodriguez, John Elway, Jana Novotná, Hakeem Olajuwon, Dan Jansen and many more) eventually won championships with clutch performances.

They did not have character flaws that prevented them from winning. They had been unlucky, or they had run into better competition. Until they didn’t.

 

The real world often does not lend itself to moralistic fables.

08-the-morning-NL-lede2-articleLarge-v2.jpg

A security guard at Walter Kerr Theater in New York City.Mark Sommerfeld for The New York Times

 

Vaccines and humility

In the case of Covid, the fable we tell ourselves is that our day-to-day behavior dictates the course of the pandemic. When we are good — by staying socially distant and wearing our masks — cases are supposed to fall. When we are bad — by eating in restaurants, hanging out with friends and going to a theater or football game — cases are supposed to rise.

 

The idea is especially alluring to anybody making an effort to be careful and feeling frustrated that so many other Americans seem blasé. After all, the Covid fable does have an some truth to it. Social distancing and masking do reduce the spread of the virus. They just are not as powerful as people often imagine.

The main determinants of Covid’s spread (other than vaccines, which are extremely effective) remain mysterious. Some activities that seem dangerous, like in-person school or crowded outdoor gatherings, may not always be. As unsatisfying as it is, we do not know why cases have recently plunged. The decline is consistent with the fact that Covid surges often last for about two months before receding, but that’s merely a description of the data, not a causal explanation.

 

“We still are really in the cave ages in terms of understanding how viruses emerge, how they spread, how they start and stop, why they do what they do,” Michael Osterholm, an epidemiologist at the University of Minnesota, has told me.

In coming weeks and months, it is possible that the virus will surge again, maybe because of a new variant or because vaccine immunity will wane. It is also possible that the population has built up enough immunity — from both vaccines and previous infections — that Delta will have been the last major wave.

 

We don’t know, and we do not have to pretend otherwise. We do not have to treat Covid as a facile referendum on virtue.

When caseloads are high, it makes sense to take precautions, even if we can’t be sure how much they matter. When caseloads are lower, it makes sense to take fewer, because almost every precaution has a cost. Other than that, the best we can do is get vaccinated and, as Osterholm says, stay humble.

 

Virus developments:

 

 

 

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52 minutes ago, The_Real_TCIII said:

View in browser|nytimes.com

Continue reading the main story

imp?s=162006&li=NN&m=e832ce413e802251cb4bb2e2387d37c1&p=NN_20211008

   

NYT-Headers-N-TheMorning%402x.png

October 8, 2021

 

Author Headshot

By David Leonhardt

     

 

Good morning. When we treat Covid as a simple morality play, we can end up making bad predictions.

 

 
 
 

 

08-the-morning-NL-lede-articleLarge-v2.jpg

University of Florida football fans at the Alabama game last month.Phelan M. Ebenhack/Associated Press

The September swoon

 

In the final weeks of this summer, with Covid-19 cases soaring and the rituals of autumn about to resume, many people assumed that the pandemic was on the verge of getting even worse.

Children were returning to classrooms five days a week. Broadway was reopening, and movie fans were heading to theaters again. In football stadiums across the country, fans were crowding together, usually unmasked, to cheer, sing and drink.

 

Given all of this — and the Delta variant — public discussion had a decidedly grim tone as the summer wound down. “It may only get worse,” read a Politico headline. “The new school year is already a disaster,” Business Insider reported.

The Washington Post cited an estimate that daily caseloads in the U.S. could reach 300,000 in August, higher than ever before. An expert quoted in The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette suggested the number could be higher yet. In The New York Times, an epidemiologist predicted that cases would rise in September because children were going back to school.

 

And what actually happened? Cases plunged.

08-MORNING-COVID-CASE-CHART-articleLarge-v2.png

Chart shows the 7-day daily average.The New York Times

 

The best measure of U.S. cases (a seven-day average, adjusted for holiday anomalies) peaked around 166,000 on Sept. 1 — the very day that seemed to augur a new surge. The number of new daily cases has since fallen almost 40 percent. Hospitalizations are down about 30 percent. Deaths, which typically change direction a few weeks after cases, have declined 13 percent since Sept. 20.

To be fair, forecasting a pandemic is inherently difficult. Virtually all of us, expert and not, have at times been surprised by Covid and incorrect about what was likely to happen next. It’s unavoidable.

 

But there is a pattern to some of the recent mistakes, and understanding it can help us avoid repeating them.

Clutch chokers

 

Let’s start by recalling a near-universal human trait: People are attracted to stories with heroes and villains. In these stories, the character flaws of the villains bring them down, allowing the decency of the heroes to triumph. The stories create a clear relationship between cause and effect. They make sense.

Books, television shows and movies are full of such stories. But for the purposes of understanding Covid, another form of mass entertainment — sports — is more useful.

 

Unlike novels or movies, sporting events involve true uncertainty. They are not part of a fictional world, with an author’s predetermined ending. And as is the case with more important subjects, like a pandemic, sports are subject to a lot of predictions. For these reasons, social scientists, including Nobel laureates, sometimes study sports to learn lessons about the human mind.

If you turn on almost any sporting event, you will hear tales of heroes and villains. Sports broadcasters often use moralistic language — with concepts like “clutch” and “choke” — to explain outcomes. The broadcasters turn games into “referenda on character,” as Joe Sheehan, who writes an excellent baseball newsletter, has put it. The athletes with strong character win, and the weak lose.

 

But anybody who watches sports for long enough will notice that these morality plays do not age well. Many athletes or coaches whom broadcasters long described as chokers (Clayton Kershaw, Andy Reid, Phil Mickelson, Alex Rodriguez, John Elway, Jana Novotná, Hakeem Olajuwon, Dan Jansen and many more) eventually won championships with clutch performances.

They did not have character flaws that prevented them from winning. They had been unlucky, or they had run into better competition. Until they didn’t.

 

The real world often does not lend itself to moralistic fables.

08-the-morning-NL-lede2-articleLarge-v2.jpg

A security guard at Walter Kerr Theater in New York City.Mark Sommerfeld for The New York Times

 

Vaccines and humility

In the case of Covid, the fable we tell ourselves is that our day-to-day behavior dictates the course of the pandemic. When we are good — by staying socially distant and wearing our masks — cases are supposed to fall. When we are bad — by eating in restaurants, hanging out with friends and going to a theater or football game — cases are supposed to rise.

 

The idea is especially alluring to anybody making an effort to be careful and feeling frustrated that so many other Americans seem blasé. After all, the Covid fable does have an some truth to it. Social distancing and masking do reduce the spread of the virus. They just are not as powerful as people often imagine.

The main determinants of Covid’s spread (other than vaccines, which are extremely effective) remain mysterious. Some activities that seem dangerous, like in-person school or crowded outdoor gatherings, may not always be. As unsatisfying as it is, we do not know why cases have recently plunged. The decline is consistent with the fact that Covid surges often last for about two months before receding, but that’s merely a description of the data, not a causal explanation.

 

“We still are really in the cave ages in terms of understanding how viruses emerge, how they spread, how they start and stop, why they do what they do,” Michael Osterholm, an epidemiologist at the University of Minnesota, has told me.

In coming weeks and months, it is possible that the virus will surge again, maybe because of a new variant or because vaccine immunity will wane. It is also possible that the population has built up enough immunity — from both vaccines and previous infections — that Delta will have been the last major wave.

 

We don’t know, and we do not have to pretend otherwise. We do not have to treat Covid as a facile referendum on virtue.

When caseloads are high, it makes sense to take precautions, even if we can’t be sure how much they matter. When caseloads are lower, it makes sense to take fewer, because almost every precaution has a cost. Other than that, the best we can do is get vaccinated and, as Osterholm says, stay humble.

 

Virus developments:

 

 

 

Cowards rely on that info to justify their childish behavior.

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3 hours ago, The_Real_TCIII said:

View in browser|nytimes.com

Continue reading the main story

imp?s=162006&li=NN&m=e832ce413e802251cb4bb2e2387d37c1&p=NN_20211008

   

NYT-Headers-N-TheMorning%402x.png

October 8, 2021

 

Author Headshot

By David Leonhardt

     

 

Good morning. When we treat Covid as a simple morality play, we can end up making bad predictions.

 

 
 
 

 

08-the-morning-NL-lede-articleLarge-v2.jpg

University of Florida football fans at the Alabama game last month.Phelan M. Ebenhack/Associated Press

The September swoon

 

In the final weeks of this summer, with Covid-19 cases soaring and the rituals of autumn about to resume, many people assumed that the pandemic was on the verge of getting even worse.

Children were returning to classrooms five days a week. Broadway was reopening, and movie fans were heading to theaters again. In football stadiums across the country, fans were crowding together, usually unmasked, to cheer, sing and drink.

 

Given all of this — and the Delta variant — public discussion had a decidedly grim tone as the summer wound down. “It may only get worse,” read a Politico headline. “The new school year is already a disaster,” Business Insider reported.

The Washington Post cited an estimate that daily caseloads in the U.S. could reach 300,000 in August, higher than ever before. An expert quoted in The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette suggested the number could be higher yet. In The New York Times, an epidemiologist predicted that cases would rise in September because children were going back to school.

 

And what actually happened? Cases plunged.

08-MORNING-COVID-CASE-CHART-articleLarge-v2.png

Chart shows the 7-day daily average.The New York Times

 

The best measure of U.S. cases (a seven-day average, adjusted for holiday anomalies) peaked around 166,000 on Sept. 1 — the very day that seemed to augur a new surge. The number of new daily cases has since fallen almost 40 percent. Hospitalizations are down about 30 percent. Deaths, which typically change direction a few weeks after cases, have declined 13 percent since Sept. 20.

To be fair, forecasting a pandemic is inherently difficult. Virtually all of us, expert and not, have at times been surprised by Covid and incorrect about what was likely to happen next. It’s unavoidable.

 

But there is a pattern to some of the recent mistakes, and understanding it can help us avoid repeating them.

Clutch chokers

 

Let’s start by recalling a near-universal human trait: People are attracted to stories with heroes and villains. In these stories, the character flaws of the villains bring them down, allowing the decency of the heroes to triumph. The stories create a clear relationship between cause and effect. They make sense.

Books, television shows and movies are full of such stories. But for the purposes of understanding Covid, another form of mass entertainment — sports — is more useful.

 

Unlike novels or movies, sporting events involve true uncertainty. They are not part of a fictional world, with an author’s predetermined ending. And as is the case with more important subjects, like a pandemic, sports are subject to a lot of predictions. For these reasons, social scientists, including Nobel laureates, sometimes study sports to learn lessons about the human mind.

If you turn on almost any sporting event, you will hear tales of heroes and villains. Sports broadcasters often use moralistic language — with concepts like “clutch” and “choke” — to explain outcomes. The broadcasters turn games into “referenda on character,” as Joe Sheehan, who writes an excellent baseball newsletter, has put it. The athletes with strong character win, and the weak lose.

 

But anybody who watches sports for long enough will notice that these morality plays do not age well. Many athletes or coaches whom broadcasters long described as chokers (Clayton Kershaw, Andy Reid, Phil Mickelson, Alex Rodriguez, John Elway, Jana Novotná, Hakeem Olajuwon, Dan Jansen and many more) eventually won championships with clutch performances.

They did not have character flaws that prevented them from winning. They had been unlucky, or they had run into better competition. Until they didn’t.

 

The real world often does not lend itself to moralistic fables.

08-the-morning-NL-lede2-articleLarge-v2.jpg

A security guard at Walter Kerr Theater in New York City.Mark Sommerfeld for The New York Times

 

Vaccines and humility

In the case of Covid, the fable we tell ourselves is that our day-to-day behavior dictates the course of the pandemic. When we are good — by staying socially distant and wearing our masks — cases are supposed to fall. When we are bad — by eating in restaurants, hanging out with friends and going to a theater or football game — cases are supposed to rise.

 

The idea is especially alluring to anybody making an effort to be careful and feeling frustrated that so many other Americans seem blasé. After all, the Covid fable does have an some truth to it. Social distancing and masking do reduce the spread of the virus. They just are not as powerful as people often imagine.

The main determinants of Covid’s spread (other than vaccines, which are extremely effective) remain mysterious. Some activities that seem dangerous, like in-person school or crowded outdoor gatherings, may not always be. As unsatisfying as it is, we do not know why cases have recently plunged. The decline is consistent with the fact that Covid surges often last for about two months before receding, but that’s merely a description of the data, not a causal explanation.

 

“We still are really in the cave ages in terms of understanding how viruses emerge, how they spread, how they start and stop, why they do what they do,” Michael Osterholm, an epidemiologist at the University of Minnesota, has told me.

In coming weeks and months, it is possible that the virus will surge again, maybe because of a new variant or because vaccine immunity will wane. It is also possible that the population has built up enough immunity — from both vaccines and previous infections — that Delta will have been the last major wave.

 

We don’t know, and we do not have to pretend otherwise. We do not have to treat Covid as a facile referendum on virtue.

When caseloads are high, it makes sense to take precautions, even if we can’t be sure how much they matter. When caseloads are lower, it makes sense to take fewer, because almost every precaution has a cost. Other than that, the best we can do is get vaccinated and, as Osterholm says, stay humble.

 

Virus developments:

 

 

 

Awesome story, and right on so many levels

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A tracker friend of mine in Missouri wrote this today and gave me permission to share it. Scary times ahead.
 
Those that follow me may have noticed that I’ve avoided writing any posts that may appear “political” for quite some time. The fact is, that venting on social media does little to nothing to change the trajectory of our increasingly Marxist government. The last election was evidence enough of that. However, there is a HUGE storm looming on the immediate horizon that everyone should know about. It is likely to hasten the collapse of our medical system, in my opinion. When I say, “hasten the collapse,” I’m not talking about years down the road, I’m talking months.
For those that don’t know my background, I am a hospital physician. I treat Covid daily. I’m also the Medical Director of a community hospital, member of the hospital board, and sitting member on the medical executive committee for the larger health care system I work for. That said, what follows is my own view, and is not necessarily the view of the system I work for.
My health care system has actively promoted the Covid vaccine, something that I have no problem with. They have also resisted mandating the vaccine for their employees, a position counter to the other 2 large hospital systems in our area. I have been proud of our administration for that stance.
Currently, health care workers are at an all time low, at a time when health care use is extremely high. Nearly every hospital in the country is working with a skeleton crew of staff. Doctor’s offices are the same. Our hospital, like most, has been forced to cap the number of patients we can admit due to insufficient staffing. Also, like most, we have been forced to close important services in our hospital, like the ICU because of staffing issues. This problem is made worse by the fact that hospitals across the country with the deepest pockets are now paying 5-6 X the normal wages of nurses in order to maintain enough staff to keep the doors open. It’s great news for nurses who are willing to relocate, but is obviously not sustainable for most hospitals. They do it with the hope that this problem will be quickly resolved. The problem is that it likely won’t be corrected before many hospitals collapse completely. The problem is already at CATASTROPHIC levels across the country, and I don’t use that word loosely.
If this were the end of the problem, it would be enough. I would still have grave concerns about the viability of smaller health care systems across the country, like the one I work for.
However, the problem is about to reach what is likely to be an unrecoverable tipping point with new legislation being pushed out by the tyrants who are in charge. They are in the process of issuing forced vaccine mandates for any organization that accepts Medicaid or Medicare. That includes nearly every single hospital in the country. It is also your doctor’s offices and health clinics. Granted, about 75% of health care workers are already vaccinated. I am among that crowd. I suspect another 10% or so will also fall in line. However, that leaves around 15% of employees that will leave health care immediately when this goes through in the next few weeks. Our system cannot survive that! There aren’t any reserves to fill in the gaps. Other states are already loosening restrictions on who can fill those roles, credentials are now less important than vaccination status. States like New York are looking at out sourcing health care jobs by bringing in more nurses from other countries. They are calling up the National Guard to fill gaps that aren’t likely to go away in the foreseeable future. There is no reasonable solution to this problem that they are purposely creating aside from complete government intervention. Whether that is the goal or not, it will be the outcome.
In our own system, there are a number of physicians who have chosen not to be vaccinated. Many of them are among the top “producers” in the system. They take care of huge numbers of patients, in surgery, in cardiology, in primary care. These are medically educated individuals who have decided that the vaccine is potentially more risk for them due to their age and health status, than Covid is. Many of them already have natural immunity from having recovered from Covid. These physicians will be forced out of practice in this country if they don’t comply. Many of them will leave.
All of this is being pushed down our throats for “the good of the community.” The trouble is, none of that is true. The only person that the Covid vaccine protects is the person who receives the shot. Their own data has shown that vaccinated people are every bit as likely to spread the virus as unvaccinated people. In fact, vaccinated people with the virus are more likely to be asymptomatic spreaders of the virus while they go on about their daily lives. Hospitals are congested, and Covid is a part of that. But it’s not the biggest part of the problem. Staffing shortages which spiked with “enhanced unemployment benefits” and have continued to worsen due to continued labor shortages across the board are the main problem. We don’t blame people with COPD or pneumonia or diabetes for “clogging up” our healthcare system, and yet it is en Vogue to blame unvaccinated individuals when they get admitted to the hospital. They are the new “lepers” among us.
I don’t know what can be done to stop this looming disaster. Our state governments are feckless at best, and complicit at worse, in their handling of this disaster. The crisis is upon us, though, and soon it will be too late for us to recover.
 
 

 

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In response to the vaccine causing myocarditis, or heart inflammation, in young men: the FDA has access to the same numbers that socialist health care systems have used to nix the Moderna vaccine.  Our FDA has decided that the VERY small risk of myocarditis following vaccination is outweighed by the more significant risk of myocarditis from actually catching the disease. That makes sense to me, particularly since the former trends mild, but the later can be quite severe, even in youngsters.

In response to Outdoortom's open letter from the director of a small hospital: you are not wrong. While most doctors actively support vaccination, I know a number who, like me, are profoundly in opposition to mandates. We are losing people who should be exempt - it's going to catch up with us. I do not think that health care workers are the primary vector for transmission of COVID at this point in time. These efforts should be focused elsewhere. They are misguided and IMHO foment discord where none should exist.

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The interesting point touched on in the letter is the reference to travel nurses . Right now Strong hospital and others here pay travel nurses 3-4x the amount they pay their own , so nurses quit Strong to become travel nurses ,I heard they lost 20 from the E.D. In one day awhile back .

So Rochester uses “ travel nurses “ from Buffalo , and Buffalo uses them from Rochester ….. that’s one sweet scam ! 
 

In an effort to keep a lid on it Strong Is doing “ in house travel “ they pay their own nurses $80 and hour to “ travel “ to floors that are short staffed . 
 

 

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Luckily it's a short walk, and so $80 an hour equates to ~$4 net.

Truth be told, I don't know anything about that. But if it's like everything else, it will probably impact your wallet. My daughter got rear-ended standing still at a traffic light. The car was called totaled. Now we need to get her a new car ASAP, and it looks like they're paying MSRP or above for many models. It's catching up with us, and it ain't going to be pretty.

 

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We are all going to suffer all sorts of ramifications because of the idiotic decision to lock down the entire country.  We could have identified all who were truly at risk and put them up in luxury hotels on some reclusive island for a year, all expenses paid, and it would have cost a small fraction of what the lock down did.

This was never about health and there's no proof more people would have died if the govt did absolutely nothing from the start.  We have been lied to from day one, and the lies continue to come in.  It's tragic.

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3 hours ago, knehrke said:

Luckily it's a short walk, and so $80 an hour equates to ~$4 net.

Truth be told, I don't know anything about that. But if it's like everything else, it will probably impact your wallet. My daughter got rear-ended standing still at a traffic light. The car was called totaled. Now we need to get her a new car ASAP, and it looks like they're paying MSRP or above for many models. It's catching up with us, and it ain't going to be pretty.

 

Hard assets are where it’s at . I was thinking of selling our farm land , not anymore , still buying ammo , and PM as well . Oh not selling our stocks and bonds ,just buying “ things .” I like having things , and not just numbers on a computer. Of course I’ve rented two storage areas and a safe deposit box ,as I want to keep my things ….

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Some doctors say to get the vaccine but all doctors agree excersise and a good diet are key to good health. Why is nobody calling out all hypocrisy from the vaccine warriors who are fat and out of shape? They dont want to put innthe hard work to stay healthy but they'll gladly roll their fat asses into the doctors for a shot . 

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Needed to run some errands ,one being new hiking shoes , as they’re on the shortage list . Went to REI a store for outdoor types who hug trees not sit in them . They have signs requiring wearing a mask ! Sorry I won’t shop where I have to wear one or show my vac card, so in I go sans mask .

No one said anything although the shoe salesperson basically dropped the boxes off and ran off…lol . Oh and there’s a sign apologizing for low inventory on shoes so I was right  . About $200 later I got me a new pair of Keens .

Next stop the gun shop ! Cops and FF buying guns and ammo not a mask in sight ! Lots of 300 BLK, .308 though .

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Needed to run some errands ,one being new hiking shoes , as they’re on the shortage list . Went to REI a store for outdoor types who hug trees not sit in them . They have signs requiring wearing a mask ! Sorry I won’t shop where I have to wear one or show my vac card, so in I go sans mask .
No one said anything although the shoe salesperson basically dropped the boxes off and ran off…lol . Oh and there’s a sign apologizing for low inventory on shoes so I was right  . About $200 later I got me a new pair of Keens .
Next stop the gun shop ! Cops and FF buying guns and ammo not a mask in sight ! Lots of 300 BLK, .308 though .

I didnt wear one in chapel hill this week. They can bite me. This crap doesnt end until we end it. I wont mess around at the airport though, they dont play!


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