slayer

42 acres

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so I am in the process of closing on a new home. I lucked out and bought a farm with 42 acres. I was thinking about planting some fruit trees . Does anybody know where to find trees to plant.I will have 25 acres of fields and about 15 acres of woods the rest is land around the house. 

 

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You're going to be there awhile, so think carefully about what you want and don't just throw the first big box trees you find into the ground. There's a real difference to be had in suppliers. If you want a freestanding tree that will live for a long time, consider standard or semi-standard rootstock rather than dwarf stock that's all the rage in orchards. In terms of varieties, think about when you want ripe fruit and what types of characteristics you're looking for. And as for nurseries, I use Cummins down in Ithaca. They have a good website and are very responsive.

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I would definitely get a game plan laid out and make sure to plant them where youll want them for a long time. With that being said, there is a member on here whom has a fruit tree farm where he grafts trees. His trees are mainly for feeding wildlife. Not sure if that was your plan or to feed your family? His name is Ryan, has high quality trees. I can get you more info if youd like. 

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Me and my dad have raised apple trees from seeds, about 10 and they are now roughly 5 years old and range from 6-8 feet tall with wide tops and have begun to produce alot of fruit this year.  Thats just another option for you if your in it for the long haul and want to start with a specific apple in mind. We found this certain crap apple tree that produced tiny cherry size apples. Odd thing is my trees are producing much larger apples then the mother tree, must be all the fertilizer. 

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Not only is this a good time to transplant fruit trees but many stores have close outs on their nursery stock now. I often see trees at less than half price this time of year compared to Spring prices. Last year the close out prices at Lowe's and Tractor Supply were the same, but the TS trees were much larger in stem diameter. I try to pick up a few more every year.

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If your thinking of setting this place up for hunting deer, be sure to get a variety of apple tree that bears it fruit in late October!!! Most ripen in august or early September. Hint hint!!!

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I used to hunt a property that had two mature apple trees. Both produced unbelievable amounts of fruit. The deer swarmed to one of the trees and eventually ate every one. The apples from the other tree sat on the ground and rotted....the deer wouldn't eat them. Rabbits and squirrels wouldn't touch them either. Most years there were still apples on the ground into April. Can't tell you much about the bad apples, but they were yellow.

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your county coop extension sells all kind of trees and seedlings or you can buy direct from state sale is usually listed by febuary and pick up is april for planting

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I've hunted almost everyday of my life.. the rest have been wasted!

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your county coop extension sells all kind of trees and seedlings or you can buy direct from state sale is usually listed by febuary and pick up is april for planting
This is where i get mine. I've planted about 12 fruit trees. 2 cherry, 2 pear, and 8 apple. All the ones i bought came from Schuyler county soil and water district. Their prices are decent for the size of trees you get. My cherry trees were $20/ea but 8' tall. Once you get a few trees established you can graft your own pretty easily. You could in theory start an orchard from only a few eatablished trees.

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6 hours ago, chas0218 said:

This is where i get mine. I've planted about 12 fruit trees. 2 cherry, 2 pear, and 8 apple. All the ones i bought came from Schuyler county soil and water district. Their prices are decent for the size of trees you get. My cherry trees were $20/ea but 8' tall. Once you get a few trees established you can graft your own pretty easily. You could in theory start an orchard from only a few eatablished trees.

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what would i be grafting them onto. I may not understand what your saying

 

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What's important to know is that trees grown from seed will tend to be quite different from the mother tree. All of the "named" varieties of tress are grown from scions that are grafted onto root stock, so they're effectively clones of the mother. You can purchase rootstock to graft onto using scions from your own desirable trees. The rootstock determines the size of the final tree, as well as many other characteristics such as soil preferences. The best thing that you can do before investing in trees is to recruit local knowledge. Many trees at big box stores are on unknown rootstock, and if you're investing decades into a tree, you probably want what's best for your soil, climate, and objectives (ie. late drop for wildlife).

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Hopefully you are still trolling the site Slayer.  The best place I have found for trees is a place called Schlabachs Nursery, near Fredonia/Buffalo somewhere.  They are old school Mendonites and are not online. You have to send cash or check and call them or snail mail for a catalog.  They have bare root/whips. Excellent quality for best prices. 866 600 5203 .    YOu also need to think about spray program, the amount of time for trimming,  fertilizing, thinning, deer fence, mouse guards. It is time and effort to get a crop of most fruit. I have found certain varieties of Asian Pears seems to escape most of the bugs and diseases prevalent in my area.  They are wonderful fruit as well. DO pay attention to root stock. Dwarf often times need staking and require more attention.  Also fruit can be smaller and less quantity. Good luck...

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Thread getting a bit old, but still timely....

Others had mentioned already, your county cooperative extension should sell young trees. I am in Oswego County, every spring on site they sell approx. 3" tall bare root seedlings very cheap. I think I paid 20.oo for ten oak seedings....bought a mix of red and whites. They all lived, They also offer conifers, apples, etc. Tough to go wrong for the price. I have bought nursery potted trees, and they never seem to do so well. 

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If you can try to find an orchard near by and ask them for some clippings from their trees this spring. Its free and will produce faster than growing from seeds. 

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