ApexerER

If you could plant 1 thing...What would it be?

Recommended Posts

5 minutes ago, moog5050 said:

Check the local QDMA for soybean seeds - great great deal (if the deer don't crush them before they have a chance like they did mine)

@rachunter stratford isn't real close to me but doable if if you're looking for enough bags to be worth the trip. each bag goes for $10 and plants about a 1/4 acre. we'll get another shipment once warmer weather gets here again. it'll be posted in the QDMA forums on here when we do get them.

  • Thanks 1

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Upper Hudson River Valley QDMA

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, dbHunterNY said:

@rachunter stratford isn't real close to me but doable if if you're looking for enough bags to be worth the trip. each bag goes for $10 and plants about a 1/4 acre. we'll get another shipment once warmer weather gets here again. it'll be posted in the QDMA forums on here when we do get them.

Thought the 50lb bags did an acre.  I used two bags on less than an acre. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, TreeGuy said:

Plant your butt in the stand for the rut....

Sent from my LM-V405 using Tapatalk
 

Over a corn field.   Lol

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the guys saying beans ,do you currently see alot of activity in beans ? A guy i work with lives next to a bean field and says the deer are almost never in the beans.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Deer really only like soybeans when they are young and green.  I never understood why anyone would want to plant them in the spring for deer hunting.  If you want to plant just one time with minimal equipment, I would go with a mix of winter wheat, white clover, and soybeans, broadcast around September 1.     Deer like wheat better than rye.  That will give you good attraction the first fall.  If the first killing frost is late, the soybeans will give you top-notch early October attraction.  The white clover will give you a few more years of decent attraction, and can be maintained with just a few mowings per season.  Chop off the remaining wheat with a mower before it goes to seed the following late spring.   That will give you 3-4 years from just one day's planting on that area.    

With lots of equipment, if I only plant one thing, it is usually corn.    

Edited by wolc123

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, moog5050 said:

I might try the oats this year.   I love the frigid forage brassicas but I need to change it up.  

i had really good luck with buck forage oats they were still green on the last weekend of november and getting hit hard, planted first week in septmber and grew very well

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jeremy K said:

For the guys saying beans ,do you currently see alot of activity in beans ? A guy i work with lives next to a bean field and says the deer are almost never in the beans.  

My buddy planted 70 acres of beans on his farm.  Because of the early/deep snow he couldn't harvest them.  The deer were in them every single day over the winter, along with the turkeys.  Deer like green beans and brown beans, just not yellowing beans.  There is a reason that the Midwest guys hunt over corn AND beans during the late season.  

Wolc has alot of knowledge, but he's dead wrong about beans.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, moog5050 said:

Thought the 50lb bags did an acre.  I used two bags on less than an acre. 

Depends if you drill them or broadcast them.  They suggest 80 lbs to the acre if you broadcast them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, dbHunterNY said:

@rachunter stratford isn't real close to me but doable if if you're looking for enough bags to be worth the trip. each bag goes for $10 and plants about a 1/4 acre. we'll get another shipment once warmer weather gets here again. it'll be posted in the QDMA forums on here when we do get them.

I'm actually on long island right now,I'll keep an eye out for your post and hit it on my way up.Thanks

 The problem with the mixed seeds is the grass takes over and chokes everything else out.Up by me the deer are pretty spread out. I'd say there's about 6-8 deer that cross my property until they start seeking.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, rachunter said:

What kind of beans and are you guys using food grade or seeds designed for deer. If there’s a difference. I’ve been using throw and grow seven card stud and radish extreme,but want to try separate plots this year.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Leftover ag beans from farmer friends.  If the deer find them they will eat them to death unless you can plant a large plot, or put up a fence.  By large, I mean an acre+.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, rachunter said:

I'm actually on long island right now,I'll keep an eye out for your post and hit it on my way up.Thanks

 The problem with the mixed seeds is the grass takes over and chokes everything else out.Up by me the deer are pretty spread out. I'd say there's about 6-8 deer that cross my property until they start seeking.

 

Kill the grass off. For me that was the answer instead of planting one crop. If your planting in 5h that's where i do my plots and how i have had luck.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should double check about planting around the solar panels. When we looked at putting on in at our farm, part of the deal was we would keep it mowed four times a year.  They need to easily go between the panels for any repairs or adjustments, so the field needs to be clean.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, Otto said:

You should double check about planting around the solar panels. When we looked at putting on in at our farm, part of the deal was we would keep it mowed four times a year.  They need to easily go between the panels for any repairs or adjustments, so the field needs to be clean.  

Not sure what the rules are in NY.  Here in VT, solar farms of a certain size have to install deer fence.  They did this near my buddy's place.  He was worried, but he put in a 1 acre food plot and the fence ended up funneling deer to him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Id choose corn or soybeans. Soybeans will be hit in spring, and as soon as they start browning up, which is during bow, the deer stop going to them. But this time of year the deer are in my soybeans alot. Corn would be good throughout bow and gun. Turkeys love the soybeans too, shot my fall bird this year in the beans. Hoping theres enough beans left in the spring to get another.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the replies.....My experience with soy beans and corn is the deer love the beans all summer and then as soon as they dried up they didn't touch them and went for the corn. Maybe they would keep on the beans if there wasn't corn available?  In August there would be 30+ deer in the beans in the late evening....In October there weren't any.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, ApexerER said:

Thanks for all the replies.....My experience with soy beans and corn is the deer love the beans all summer and then as soon as they dried up they didn't touch them and went for the corn. Maybe they would keep on the beans if there wasn't corn available?  In August there would be 30+ deer in the beans in the late evening....In October there weren't any.....

Most of the time, farmers harvest before the deer return to the beans.  But if left unharvested, they are a great draw this time of the year.  High protein and just what bucks need to recover from the rut.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, stubborn1VT said:

Not sure what the rules are in NY.  Here in VT, solar farms of a certain size have to install deer fence.  They did this near my buddy's place.  He was worried, but he put in a 1 acre food plot and the fence ended up funneling deer to him.

Yes, ours was to be fenced too, but to keep people out more than deer - chain link and razor wire.  It was located near a State Highway, so that may have played into it, or maybe it was town rules.  The project died for other reasons, but mowing and fencing were a part of it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Deer really only like soybeans when they are young and green.  I never understood why anyone would want to plant them in the spring for deer hunting.  If you want to plant just one time with minimal equipment, I would go with a mix of winter wheat, white clover, and soybeans, broadcast around September 1.     Deer like wheat better than rye.  That will give you good attraction the first fall.  If the first killing frost is late, the soybeans will give you top-notch early October attraction.  The white clover will give you a few more years of decent attraction, and can be maintained with just a few mowings per season.  Chop off the remaining wheat with a mower before it goes to seed the following late spring.   That will give you 3-4 years from just one day's planting on that area.    
With lots of equipment, if I only plant one thing, it is usually corn.    
I've witnessed the exact opposite. Deer will hammer beans as long as they are there. Harvesting beans leaves little to no left overs vs corn, and might be what your seeing. I killed a nice buck last couple days of ml season coming out to eat beans.

Sent from my LM-V405 using Tapatalk

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Soybeans. They are preferred more throughout the year and more beneficial than corn. They'll eat them once they start growing until when the very last seed pod is left. Another reason i mentioned soybeans is due to the fact you mentioned not having farm equipment. Soybeans are easy to grow, Corn is not near as easy. Corn is also a serious nutrient scavenger, basically depleting your soils goods by years end.  You can get hooked up with QDMA and get beans for cheap, and if you get an early maturing bean, you can double crop your plots with a cereal grain or even a brassica blend if you plant early enough with the right bean. 

Corn is good too but I think youd spend a bunch of money to grow corn, and even more to do it with great success. This past year i did a soybeans, corn and milo blend. 

Soybeans, can just be rolled into the soft damp soil/thatch with a heavy roller. Just spray vegetation dead before or after( after if Round upReady seed)

Unless money is not an issue go with Corn, but i still suggest soybeans. it will help soil slightly where corn will destroy it 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As an outside observer - don't soybeans help bucks more (deer in general) during antler growth than corn that ripens when racks are already fully developed? They also eat the bean plants & not just the beans themselves, unlike corn. JMO, both feed and draw deer, just depends on when you want to see them in you food plot. Deer go crazy for corn, but IRC it's the worst for nutrient value and like others have said it also depletes the soil more than other plot crops would.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
As an outside observer - don't soybeans help bucks more (deer in general) during antler growth than corn that ripens when racks are already fully developed? They also eat the bean plants & not just the beans themselves, unlike corn. JMO, both feed and draw deer, just depends on when you want to see them in you food plot. Deer go crazy for corn, but IRC it's the worst for nutrient value and like others have said it also depletes the soil more than other plot crops would.
Beans are very high in protein, which is crucial for antler growth. Corn is low in nutritional value but still gives deer energy.

The nutrients corn depletes from the soil can easily be replenished with fertilizers.

Soy will still be the "best" for deer, from a nutrition stand point and will bring the deer in from the first sprouts to the last hanging bean.

Sent from my LM-V405 using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/7/2019 at 11:29 AM, TreeGuy said:

Beans are very high in protein, which is crucial for antler growth. Corn is low in nutritional value but still gives deer energy.

The nutrients corn depletes from the soil can easily be replenished with fertilizers.

Soy will still be the "best" for deer, from a nutrition stand point and will bring the deer in from the first sprouts to the last hanging bean.

Sent from my LM-V405 using Tapatalk
 

You'd have a lot less invested with soybeans vs corn, and at the end of season, have benefitted the herd more than corn will. Even though corn is a high energy source during winter months.. just no wheres near the nutrient comparison of beans 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.