squirrelwhisperer

Hunting Dogs - What's Your Choice

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As I said earlier, the Brittany can do it all.

Don't overlook the Standard Poodle as a tractable hard hunter that's easy to live with and non shedding.  

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8 minutes ago, left field said:

As I said earlier, the Brittany can do it all.

Don't overlook the Standard Poodle as a tractable hard hunter that's easy to live with and non shedding.  

A poodle...really? That's awesome! My sister had a small version, Rusty. Loved that dog!! Standard is the big one, right?


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My last dog passed away when my 1st son was still very young.  Now I'll have to wait till my second boy is a little older and a bit more independent before we can add another "baby" to the household.  But I'm itching for one.  I'm also limited in the size (part of city apartment living).  Another forum member has a Mountain Feist and I took immediate interest.  I 'm pretty sure in a couple of years, that's what I'll end up getting.  Just concerned that if it's off the leash, it'll run off chasing after something and I won't find it till hours later.

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"We do not inherit the Earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children." - Native American Indian Proverb

"My goal in life is to become as wonderful as my dog thinks I am" - Toby & Eileen Green

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1 hour ago, squirrelwhisperer said:

A poodle...really? That's awesome! My sister had a small version, Rusty. Loved that dog!! Standard is the big one, right?

Yes, the big one. They were developed as a hunting breed. Still have a bit of a novelty factor.

Smart dogs, a touch soft and will need to be trained accordingly. Poodles aren't GSDs. 

If you're really feeling adventurous let your poodle's coat grow out and cord it.

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The Pudelpointer (another good breed to consider) is a German cross of a standard and a pointer. Cool breed. Expensive though.

image.png.40a65443b4f36314d3b7f24b95db77d1.png

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My buddy's Chesapeake Bay retriever is a great dog for duck hunting.  He's trained her well and I know she's great in the house with his kids.  He feels strongly that finding the right breeder was very important.

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Mountain Feist

It sounds like we had similar criteria when looking for breeds. I can't say enough good things about this breed. They're not as common, and not much online about them. 

Roughly 30lbs when grown

App 18 inches at the shoulder.

Minimal shedding and simple grooming.

Awesome inside dog. Mellow and great with kids. Wicked smart. Took right to crate training. Only eats about 1 cup of dry food in the morning and another at night. Does not howl our bark unless hunting. Does not require a ton of exercise. When hunting, he tends to stay within 30 feet. He wears a collar but I never have to use it. Even when on a scent he'll come when I call him. Bred for squirrel, but will look for anything. All around awesome dog. 

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Edited by Bolt action
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3 hours ago, crappyice said:


Trico also came from really strong lines which deserves more credit than what I did with him.



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I had a gsp from strong lines and he was ready to go right out of the box.  The only thing i had to do was train him with commands.  Sit,  come, fetch, etc.  Finding a dog with good proven hunting lines is what’s important.  Not that a backyard breeding cant make a great dog, but having a  proven track record lets you know what you are getting.  Any shortcomings from my dog was more to do with me than it had to do with him. 

 

If you want a dog that chases fur and feather id suggest contacting a navhda chapter and see what breedings they might know about. 

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I read a couple books. I liked this one the best as far as my personal needs.  I was a weekend warrior. I felt like this book was excellent.   I went to some navhda trainings but i didnt have the time to commit.  But if you have the time to spend I would definitely join a chapter. 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Paula said:

Beagles

This was my first thought but my wife had one as a child and adamantly said no to this breed. If I got one we would both be in his dog house lol. 


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2 hours ago, left field said:

Yes, the big one. They were developed as a hunting breed. Still have a bit of a novelty factor.

Smart dogs, a touch soft and will need to be trained accordingly. Poodles aren't GSDs. 

If you're really feeling adventurous let your poodle's coat grow out and cord it.

image.png.658f96711bc35743f2e5180243417461.png

The Pudelpointer (another good breed to consider) is a German cross of a standard and a pointer. Cool breed. Expensive though.

image.png.40a65443b4f36314d3b7f24b95db77d1.png

I love poodles because of my sister's dog. DUDE...that dog has dreadlocks!! I'd name him Rasta lol


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1 hour ago, Bolt action said:

Mountain Feist

It sounds like we had similar criteria when looking for breeds. I can't say enough good things about this breed. They're not as common, and not much online about them. 

Roughly 30lbs when grown

App 18 inches at the shoulder.

Minimal shedding and simple grooming.

Awesome inside dog. Mellow and great with kids. Wicked smart. Took right to crate training. Only eats about 1 cup of dry food in the morning and another at night. Does not howl our bark unless hunting. Does not require a ton of exercise. When hunting, he tends to stay within 30 feet. He wears a collar but I never have to use it. Even when on a scent he'll come when I call him. Bred for squirrel, but will look for anything. All around awesome dog. 

IMG_20191217_140349773_HDR.jpg

IMG_20191128_092350169_HDR.jpg

That is a good lookin animal! Love the "review".

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8 minutes ago, squirrelwhisperer said:

This was my first thought but my wife had one as a child and adamantly said no to this breed. If I got one we would both be in his dog house lol. 

Anyone I talk to about a Beagle either love them or hate them.  Odd.


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"We do not inherit the Earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children." - Native American Indian Proverb

"My goal in life is to become as wonderful as my dog thinks I am" - Toby & Eileen Green

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11 minutes ago, Elmo said:

Anyone I talk to about a Beagle either love them or hate them.  Odd.

She said all her neighbors hated them (her fam) because of the noise and she hated the potholes in the yard. Apparently, they quite loud as well as quite the diggers. Too bad. I read their nose is second only to a bloodhound in the whole of the dog kingdom. Also, everything I read said they are good family dogs. 

Edited by squirrelwhisperer

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2 hours ago, left field said:

Yes, the big one. They were developed as a hunting breed. Still have a bit of a novelty factor.

Smart dogs, a touch soft and will need to be trained accordingly. Poodles aren't GSDs. 

If you're really feeling adventurous let your poodle's coat grow out and cord it.

image.png.658f96711bc35743f2e5180243417461.png

The Pudelpointer (another good breed to consider) is a German cross of a standard and a pointer. Cool breed. Expensive though.

image.png.40a65443b4f36314d3b7f24b95db77d1.png

I am picking up a standard poodle pup next month. This is our second, we have an almost 9yo now. Best dog ever. Very smart, no shedding hair in the house. Getting the new pup from the same breeder. Stopped at the training facility yesterday to see about signing her up for starter puppy lessons. The plan is to see how she'll track. Our current poodle is my daughter's and she wouldn't let me take her hunting.  She said people would laugh at me out with a poodle...Only those that don't know they're bred for hunting.

Won't be doing the dreadlocks.

http://vipoodle.org/versatile-poodles/huntingfield-poodles/

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43 minutes ago, squirrelwhisperer said:

This was my first thought but my wife had one as a child and adamantly said no to this breed. If I got one we would both be in his dog house lol. 

Why so prejudice? 

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I grew up field trialing UKC beagles. Some of my favorite childhood memories are of handling dogs for the old guys in the clubs. If I was lucky, they'd pay me with a soda :)

I'll always have a soft spot in my heart for beagles, but dad never let the hunting dogs in the house, he said it would make them lazy. I know several people who have beagles as pets, and outside of barking (they are a hound) they are great house dogs. 

I grew up with terriers in the house, Miniature Schnauzers first, then Wire Haired Fox Terriers, which my parents still breed and sell. I know that I'll always have a terrier in my life, they are such smart, tenacious, and all around, good dogs. 

We also have a pug and an English Bulldog. Their smushed faces aren't built for hunting, but they are good family members :) 

Edited by Splitear_Leland
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1 hour ago, squirrelwhisperer said:

I love poodles because of my sister's dog. DUDE...that dog has dreadlocks!! I'd name him Rasta lol

For true “dreadiness” you want the Komondor.
 

 

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24 minutes ago, Splitear_Leland said:

I grew up field trialing UKC beagles. Some of my favorite childhood memories are of handling dogs for the old guys in the clubs. If I was lucky, they'd pay me with a soda :)

I'll always have a soft spot in my heart for beagles, but dad never let the hunting dogs in the house, he said it would make them lazy. I know several people who have beagles as pets, and outside of barking (they are a hound) they are great house dogs. 

I grew up with terriers in the house, Miniature Schnauzers first, then Wire Haired Fox Terriers, which my parents still breed and sell. I know that I'll always have a terrier in my life, they are such smart, tenacious, and all around, good dogs. 

We also have a pug and an English Bulldog. Their smushed faces are built for hunting, but they are good family members :) 

English bulldog for hunting? What is their forte? Wife mentioned she would like one. We may have a winner


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I know your wife is dead set against a beagle but you can't beat a beagle for a good rabbit and pheasant dog along with being a terrific people loving dog. If you plan on keeping a beagle in the house you should have no problem with noise. Just get a puppy or a young dog and spend time training your dog. I have 3 beagles now and have had beagles for the last 58 years. I have never had a problem training one nor have I ever had to get rid of one. Whatever you decide on I wish you good luck.                                valoroutdoors.com 

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Labrador Retrievers are my favorite I also had a springer spaniel that was a fun dog but Labs have that drive if you find a good one. Cooper is AKC JR and SR Hunter and will do just about anything from blind casts to whistle commands. I would love to brag and say I taught him everything but I had a professional trainer work with him on and off for the first  two years of his life. It takes a great deal of time to train a dog and time I don’t have so when I hunt I have a finished turn key ready dog. He’s also an amazing pet and knows how to turn that switch on when it’s time to hunt . 

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43 minutes ago, squirrelwhisperer said:

English bulldog for hunting? What is their forte? Wife mentioned she would like one. We may have a winner

She can hunt up dog biscuits like nobody's business.

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