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EHD outbreak in NY?

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I’ve been e-mailing a DEC wildlife biologist on number of dead and where.  the ones I’ve came across are all in groups, and mostly near known EHD areas. 

And so s/he didn’t want to come out and test? That seems odd since the guy I contacted regarding the deer in Biz’s pop’s backyard was immediately interested in testing the deer. Dept of sanitation was too quick for him though and scooped it up before he could test it.


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well this sounds like it is really  bad if you hunt in these areas and i would hate it in my area dont know much about EHD but if these midges have always been around seems like nature doing its thing,,,, I did see one video on this few years ago and the guy on it sprayed bug killer around his water sources as the midges come from the mud on the banks and it was some what localized dry years were the worst ......

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Didn’t mention testing. probably not practical , when it’s been confirmed in the area. Just said, hope for a chilly October. Which is about the best we can do. As a hunter, I’m bringing it up, so others aren’t surprised, at lack of deer in certain areas..probably a good idea to pre season scout water holes to see if area is affected, then go off of that.

one area that got hit, still has a nice buck I’m after, so they’re not all dead, but if I had to guess, at least half the herd is gone there.  Frost is still a long ways off and Hunting is tough enough as it is around here

It seema spotty, I’ve looked at areas that got hammered, than a mile down the rd , no signs of it. The areas with constant running water. Or plenty of it, seem to be the best, which makes sense 
 

 

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Didn’t mention testing. probably not practical , when it’s been confirmed in the area. Just said, hope for a chilly October. Which is about the best we can do. As a hunter, I’m bringing it up, so others aren’t surprised, at lack of deer in certain areas..probably a good idea to pre season scout water holes to see if area is affected, then go off of that.
one area that got hit, still has a nice buck I’m after, so they’re not all dead, but if I had to guess, at least half the herd is gone there.  Frost is still a long ways off and Hunting is tough enough as it is around here
It seema spotty, I’ve looked at areas that got hammered, than a mile down the rd , no signs of it. The areas with constant running water. Or plenty of it, seem to be the best, which makes sense 
 
 

Define “hammered” and maybe specify your location(at least a town name? I am not trying to steal your spot) since the biologist I spoke with did not seem as concerned as you. Just odd that they are not more concerned


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Here is some stuff I found on EHD

 

 

 

 

 

Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) has been around for many years. It is believed that EHD can be first found and tracked back to around 1890 and has been responsible for die-offs of many different species across North America. Diseases such as blackleg, blacktongue, bluetongue, mycotic stomatitis or hemorrhagic septicemia were thought to have been the cause of many of these die-offs. After further analysis the true causative agent was never confirmed. After further review of the case history and other telltale signs and lesions, seasonal occurrence, and lack of a bacterial agent suggests that they might have been EHD.

 

Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) is a hemorrhagic disease of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) caused by an infection of a virus from the genus Orbivirus subsequently called Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV).[1][2] It is an infectious, and sometimes fatal, virus that is characterized by extensive hemorrhages, and is found throughout the United States. Large-scale outbreaks in wild ruminants affect livestock and the production industry.[3] EHD has been found in some domestic ruminants and many species of deer including white-tailed deer, mule deer, and pronghorn antelope.[4] Seropositive black-tailed deer, fallow deer, red deer, wapiti, and roe deer have also been found, which essentially means that they were exposed to the disease at some time in the past, but may not be involved in transmission. Outbreaks of EHD have been reported in cattle, although it is rare for them to develop disease or die. Sheep may develop clinical signs; however, this is also rare.[2] EHD is often called bluetongue, but this is incorrect. Bluetongue virus is closely related to EHDV, and has similar clinical signs, but it is a different disease. Bluetongue is a serious disease in cattle, as well as other ruminants, and can have a significant effect on international trade. Testing at animal health laboratories is necessary to distinguish between the viruses that cause bluetongue and EHD.

 

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1 hour ago, crappyice said:


Define “hammered” and maybe specify your location(at least a town name? I am not trying to steal your spot) since the biologist I spoke with did not seem as concerned as you. Just odd that they are not more concerned


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It's because scientific institutions such as Cornell describe EHD this way:

  • EHD primarily affects white-tailed deer and can cause significant mortality events, particularly in the northern United States. 

Yet, the DEC, in their infinite wisdom, put this line in their September 3 press release announcing EHD has been confirmed:

  • EHD outbreaks do not have a significant long-term impact on deer populations. 

That right there, folks, explains everything. BTW, the DEC sends their samples to Cornell for testing...

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56 minutes ago, phade said:

It's because scientific institutions such as Cornell describe EHD this way:

  • EHD primarily affects white-tailed deer and can cause significant mortality events, particularly in the northern United States. 

Yet, the DEC, in their infinite wisdom, put this line in their September 3 press release announcing EHD has been confirmed:

  • EHD outbreaks do not have a significant long-term impact on deer populations. 

That right there, folks, explains everything. BTW, the DEC sends their samples to Cornell for testing...

Thats because a specific local event might seem catastrophic.

But long term you can knock the shit out of whitetails and they will rebound.

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Give it a name, apply human sentiment, and its no longer a wild animal its a Disney character.

 

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2 hours ago, crappyice said:


Define “hammered” and maybe specify your location(at least a town name? I am not trying to steal your spot) since the biologist I spoke with did not seem as concerned as you. Just odd that they are not more concerned


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Pretty sure I already outlined the areas I’ve seen effected, and provided photo evidence of the hammering. They’re probably not too concerned, since even at half the amount of deer in our area, there’s still plenty to go around. They certainly are not going to be endangered anytime soon. Hammered to me is 14 dead in a 400yd stretch of creek, 26 dead on one farm and over 30 dead in one neighborhood..I guess it all depends on where you hunt, if it’s not in your area, it ain’t too bad..if it is, it’s hammered? 

Look, I’m in the woods 150 days a year scouting or hunting. Which means, I’m probably more aware of what’s going on, than the average person. But, with that said, If you or anybody else is not convinced the deer herd is taking a pounding in our region,  it’s not my job to be the convincer.
 

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Easy for people that never seen it first hand or experienced it to down play it. Till it hits your area.... especially if the local hunters treat it like non issue and then hunting season comes along and they kill off the remaining deer as usual.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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13 hours ago, Dinsdale said:

Thats because a specific local event might seem catastrophic.

But long term you can knock the shit out of whitetails and they will rebound.

I've been through two outbreaks; it took 4-5 years for hunting to get back to a close to normal. As noted by others here who have been around it. I'd call that long-term in my book. Both of those times I was on a 4,300 acre block with more than 100/acre per hunter density. No thanks - it's not short-term and it's not a small deal IMO.

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I've been through two outbreaks; it took 4-5 years for hunting to get back to a close to normal. As noted by others here who have been around it. I'd call that long-term in my book. Both of those times I was on a 4,300 acre block with more than 100/acre per hunter density. No thanks - it's not short-term and it's not a small deal IMO.

Agree 1000% which makes me wonder(or maybe just disappointed) why DEC wouldn’t be more active in the investigation of these cases?


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It would be nice to have more info from DEC. Even if it is only to say that there is nothing that can be done to eradicate midges without adverse impact to other species, their best estimate of casualties based on reports, etc.

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I took a walk on DEP land in 3S today. Checked streams and ponds, no sign of any dead deer. Nothing odd smelling either, so hopefully a good sign. The stream was dryer than ever actually. I will likely check my dad's land where i hunt on sunday. 

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State says "we have had reports of EHD suspected deer dying in all of those areas (Putnam/Dutchess) and collected samples for testing. Since being originally identified in Cold Spring and Goshen, the outbreak seems to have spread into southern Dutchess and other portions of Orange."

Some additional unfortunate confirmation.

I do wish that like cdbing suggests a more public statement would be made by DEC. Hard to believe things from the internet (no insult implied to any poster) these days or the “news” outlets. First hand knowledge is about the only knowledge I trust


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8 minutes ago, crappyice said:

State says "we have had reports of EHD suspected deer dying in all of those areas (Putnam/Dutchess) and collected samples for testing. Since being originally identified in Cold Spring and Goshen, the outbreak seems to have spread into southern Dutchess and other portions of Orange."

Some additional unfortunate confirmation.

I do wish that like cdbing suggests a more public statement would be made by DEC. Hard to believe things from the internet (no insult implied to any poster) these days or the “news” outlets. First hand knowledge is about the only knowledge I trust


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Agree. Are they (DEC) walking lands to try to find bodies?

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I just got an email from the DEC about that.
DEC Delivers press release
DEC Delivers Press Release - Information to keep you connected and informed from the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation
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DEC Confirms Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease in Putnam and Orange County Deer

Disease is Not Transmissible to Humans; New Yorkers Encouraged to Report Sick or Dead Deer to DEC

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) today confirmed that several white-tailed deer in the towns of Nelsonville and Cold Spring in Putnam County and near Goshen in Orange County died after contracting Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD). EHD is a viral disease of white-tailed deer that cannot be contracted by humans.

EHD virus is carried by biting midges, small bugs often called no-see-ums or 'punkies.' Once infected with EHD, deer usually die within 36 hours. The disease is not spread from deer to deer or from deer to humans.

DEC wildlife biologists collected half a dozen deer carcasses in Putnam County and submitted the carcasses to the Wildlife Health Unit for necropsy. Tissue samples were sent to the Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University where the preliminary diagnosis of EHD was confirmed. DEC also sent samples from four deer from Orange County where the preliminary diagnosis of EHD was confirmed.

The EHD virus was first confirmed in New York in 2007 in Albany, Rensselaer, and Niagara counties, and in Rockland County in 2011. EHD outbreaks are most common in the late summer and early fall when midges are abundant. EHD symptoms include fever, hemorrhage in muscle or organs, swelling of the head, neck, tongue, and lips. A deer infected with EHD may appear lame or dehydrated. Frequently, infected deer will seek out water sources and many succumb near a water source. There is no treatment for nor means to prevent EHD. The dead deer do not serve as a source of infection for other animals.

EHD outbreaks do not have a significant long-term impact on deer populations. EHD is endemic in the southern states where there are annual outbreaks, so some southern deer have developed immunity. Generally, in the northeast, EHD outbreaks occur sporadically and deer in New York have no immunity to this virus. Consequently, most EHD-infected deer in New York are expected to die. In the north, the first hard frost kills the midges that transmit the disease, ending the EHD outbreak.

Hunters should not handle or eat any deer that appears sick or acts strangely. DEC will continue to monitor the situation. Sightings of sick or dying deer should be reported to the nearest DEC Regional Office or to an Environmental Conservation Police Officer. In addition, the Department of Agriculture and Markets has alerted deer farmers and veterinarians throughout the state to be aware of the disease and to report suspicious cases.

For more information on EHD and helpful related links, visit the DEC website.

https://www.dec.ny.gov/press/press.html


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Holy crap that is an aggressive disease to kill host 36 hours after exposure.


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Holy crap that is an aggressive disease to kill host 36 hours after exposure.


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History textbooks better hire Stephen King to write up 2020. This year won’t quit!


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7 minutes ago, crappyice said:


History textbooks better hire Stephen King to write up 2020. This year won’t quit!


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And it's not over.  We still have post election riots in November.  And December.....one word....Aliens. 

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I live in Rock Tavern in Orange County and between my neighbor and I we found 30 dead deer (bucks and does). All of our woods smell like death. Trail cams are nothing but raccoons and squirrels. We live 2 min from Stewart Preserve. This is real and its bad!!! Definitely going to take a few years to rebound. 

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I live in Rock Tavern in Orange County and between my neighbor and I we found 30 dead deer (bucks and does). All of our woods smell like death. Trail cams are nothing but raccoons and squirrels. We live 2 min from Stewart Preserve. This is real and its bad!!! Definitely going to take a few years to rebound. 

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db5d4047b5cb101e893e9bef54ec2c73.jpg


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