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Early studies are showing [mention=871]Biz-R-OWorld[/mention]blood is 99.99% effective at preventing Covid.  But the side effects are horrendous.  Fear of tree stands, loss of taste for delicious doe meat, and a love for Redsox.  

 

I’ll take my chances with the 95% effective Pfizer. 

 

You’re forgetting I hunted a treestand both days before I got covid. Maybe that’s why I got it!

 

And 95% cut it out. They can’t even test accurately yet, how can a vaccine be that accurate. Wait till the UK strain comes in a few weeks to NY

 

 

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I will not tell anyone what they should do.   I will simply mention that my wife is in ICU right now battling COVID.  She had an already reduced immune system from a very difficult war with cancer she

It seems like it's time to weigh in with my useless  - though not uninformed - opinion. I teach this stuff to medical students. Yeah, I'm a PhD, but one of the smart ones, okay? Lol. Anyway, whil

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14 minutes ago, Biz-R-OWorld said:

 

You’re forgetting I hunted a treestand both days before I got covid. Maybe that’s why I got it!

 

And 95% cut it out. They can’t even test accurately yet, how can a vaccine be that accurate. Wait till the UK strain comes in a few weeks to NY

 

 

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Ah, so it’s not actually a fear.  And I forgot another side effect is urine that attracts bucks... that’s priceless! 
 

“UK strain” is likely here already.

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As a first responder, I won’t be taking this. Our union has already told our employer to pound sand. 
Did your employer imply that you were going to be mandated to take it? You are the first I have heard this from......thank God for unions if your employer did try to mandate.....it's your choice not the mans.

On a side note I am taking mine as soon as it's available to me....most likely later next month.

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18 minutes ago, mlammerhirt said:

Did your employer imply that you were going to be mandated to take it? You are the first I have heard this from......thank God for unions if your employer did try to mandate.....it's your choice not the mans.

On a side note I am taking mine as soon as it's available to me....most likely later next month.

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Our employer has tried to make us be tested, the union told them no. They have not even brought up vaccinations yet but they will fight that too. Im not anti vax, but i'm not standing in line on this one first. 

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It's not the immediate side effects I'm worried about, it's the long term damage that this could potentially due.   

With a 99.5% survival rate, there's just no way I would take it.  If the airlines were require it, I wouldn't fly.  

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Whether I'm for it or not.  I just find it odd that I'm last on the list behind prisoners and homeless people.  Apparently they're more important than me.

Do you think they feel those people are more important? I wonder if they are looked at as an expendable “test” group by our government.


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Good thing we didn't have "anti-vaxxers" in the 1950s.

 

We'd still be fighting polio and smallpox.

 

We were loaded up on buses at school and taken into the city for vaccinations. I don't remember anyone protesting then.

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7 minutes ago, wildcat junkie said:

Good thing we didn't have "anti-vaxxers" in the 1950s.

 

We'd still be fighting polio and smallpox.

 

We were loaded up on buses at school and taken into the city for vaccinations. I don't remember anyone protesting then.

Has nothing to do with being an “anti-vaxxer”, myself and my kids have done all other vaccines, no issues with tried and true vaccines. I’m just not comfortable being injected with something that is a brand new type of vaccine that has had zero long term studies. If it was a virus with a much lower survival rate, my opinion would most likely be different. 

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2 hours ago, rob-c said:

If this bill passes and I believe it will , because our fine state is run by Dem’s and we’re a nanny state . It won’t matter if one wants to get the vaccine or not you’ll be forced .

https://www.nysenate.gov/legislation/bills/2019/a11179?fbclid=IwAR2v7cHinPhCbuTZA5f4lERkwKEkcU2bcF_9CyT4zU0d_w8M_nZbIY23V9E

I'd be moving out of NYastan much sooner. 

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2 hours ago, wildcat junkie said:

Good thing we didn't have "anti-vaxxers" in the 1950s.

 

We'd still be fighting polio and smallpox.

 

We were loaded up on buses at school and taken into the city for vaccinations. I don't remember anyone protesting then.

It was a different time. Polio & smallpox were real concerns, and as far as we know, weren't created in a laboratory in China. I may sound like a kook in a tinfoil hat, but after everything I've seen this year, I don't trust very much that has the support of the government, big pharma, or the media.

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2 hours ago, WNYBuckHunter said:

Has nothing to do with being an “anti-vaxxer”, myself and my kids have done all other vaccines, no issues with tried and true vaccines. I’m just not comfortable being injected with something that is a brand new type of vaccine that has had zero long term studies. If it was a virus with a much lower survival rate, my opinion would most likely be different. 

Many won’t buy a gun or vehicle in the first model year , because they feel the “ bugs “ haven’t been worked out . Plus I dont want the chip implanted in me .

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Lot's of misinformation mixed in here. The Pfizer/BioNtech vaccine provides ~70% efficacy after the first dose and ~95% efficacy after the second dose, which is given 21 days after first dose.  This vaccine works exactly like every other vaccine.  It exposes your body to an antigen so that your immune system will recognize as foreign and build antibodies against it.   In the past, that antigen has been the killed virus itself or an attenuated (weakened) live virus.  This vaccine is utilizing mRNA protein from the virus as the antigen; not the virus itself. 

The emergency use authorizations are based on having the appropriate amount of data to statistically prove efficacy and have 2 months of safety data.  Small studies take longer to gather the required amount of data. Massive studies gather the data in a shorter amount of time.  The studies were not rushed.  They were scaled up to reduce the time. 

Whether you choose to get vaccinated or not is a personal choice, just like with the flu vaccine, but please make that decision based on facts and science rather than misinformation, opinions, or internet conspiracy theories. 

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I believe in science I'll leave it at that .

My wife ,a school teacher just tested positive.  This is a 44 year old women in tip top shape, runs marathons and goes to the gym daily.  She has been locked in our bedroom since Sunday  she can barely mustar the energy to get out of bed to use the bathroom or shower . I'm not looking to get in a pissing match with no one, but if you think your invincible think again .

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21 minutes ago, DoubleDose said:

Lot's of misinformation mixed in here. The Pfizer/BioNtech vaccine provides ~70% efficacy after the first dose and ~95% efficacy after the second dose, which is given 21 days after first dose.  This vaccine works exactly like every other vaccine.  It exposes your body to an antigen so that your immune system will recognize as foreign and build antibodies against it.   In the past, that antigen has been the killed virus itself or an attenuated (weakened) live virus.  This vaccine is utilizing mRNA protein from the virus as the antigen; not the virus itself. 

The emergency use authorizations are based on having the appropriate amount of data to statistically prove efficacy and have 2 months of safety data.  Small studies take longer to gather the required amount of data. Massive studies gather the data in a shorter amount of time.  The studies were not rushed.  They were scaled up to reduce the time. 

Whether you choose to get vaccinated or not is a personal choice, just like with the flu vaccine, but please make that decision based on facts and science rather than misinformation, opinions, or internet conspiracy 

.

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I'll probably get it when the time comes. Ultimately, we don't know what's worse, the long-term ramifications of COVID19 or the vaccine. High survival rates are one thing, taking years off the back-end of one's life is another via complications we don't fully understand yet as time hasn't elapsed. That also doesn't include the value to trying to return to some degree of normalcy, either. Unfortunately none of us know on either side of the fence we may be standing on.

 

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My brother (a clinical pharmacist at a hospital) said he’s Been drawing up doses of moderna vaccine all day today for all the employees who want it. He’s not getting it, but if he had to he would choose the moderna over the Pfizer.


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1 hour ago, sbuff said:

I believe in science I'll leave it at that .

My wife ,a school teacher just tested positive.  This is a 44 year old women in tip top shape, runs marathons and goes to the gym daily.  She has been locked in our bedroom since Sunday  she can barely mustar the energy to get out of bed to use the bathroom or shower . I'm not looking to get in a pissing match with no one, but if you think your invincible think again .

Best of luck and prayers for her recovery. 

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I will not tell anyone what they should do.   I will simply mention that my wife is in ICU right now battling COVID.  She had an already reduced immune system from a very difficult war with cancer she has been raging.  We did everything possible to avoid COVID, including my son stopping work for weeks to avoid contact with others and me working from home for months.  Most likely he contracted it from a grocery store (only place he visited)while shopping for us.   It then spread though the house as one is most contagious for the 3-4 days before they have symptoms. In other words, we could not have known until it was too late.

From what I have read, no vaccinations have ever had negative long term effects.   And by being vaccinated, I may just save the life of someone like my wife that I may into contact with at a time when I might have been contagious and not even known it without the vaccine.   Maybe not as they still don't know if it stops one from being contagious, but I certainly wouldn't want to be responsible for spreading it to a third party unknowingly even with the best of intentions.  I will do what I can to avoid that.  For someone whose job it is do deal with very sick people each day like some first responders, I would think that would be a serious consideration.  And notably, the argument that the immuno-suppressed population can be vaccinated to avoid COVID isn't always true.  I seriously doubt my wife could have been vaccinated due to the chemo she was undergoing - meaning she would have to rely on the care others took to avoid being contagious.  I wasn't going to post but I think its worthy food for thought.

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1 minute ago, Biz-R-OWorld said:

My brother (a clinical pharmacist at a hospital) said he’s Been drawing up doses of moderna vaccine all day today for all the employees who want it. He’s not getting it, but if he had to he would choose the moderna over the Pfizer.


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Did he say why?  Moderna vaccines are easier to store and distribute, so we'll be dealing more of them in the future over Pfizer. 

My only issue with Moderna is that this is literally their first product (not just a new model year, to use Nomads analogy).  But I'm certainly hoping its a successful product.  

And since you're into this stuff Biz... I bought Moderna at $22 and now its up to $129.  

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2 minutes ago, moog5050 said:

I will not tell anyone what they should do.   I will simply mention that my wife is in ICU right now battling COVID.  She had an already reduced immune system from a very difficult war with cancer she has been raging.  We did everything possible to avoid COVID, including my son stopping work for weeks to avoid contact with others and me working from home for months.  Most likely he contracted it from a grocery store (only place he visited)while shopping for us.   It then spread though the house as one is most contagious for the 3-4 days before they have symptoms. In other words, we could not have known until it was too late.

From what I have read, no vaccinations have ever had negative long term effects.   And by being vaccinated, I may just save the life of someone like my wife that I may into contact with at a time when I might have been contagious and not even known it without the vaccine.   Maybe not as they still don't know if it stops one from being contagious, but I certainly wouldn't want to be responsible for spreading it to a third party unknowingly even with the best of intentions.  I will do what I can to avoid that.  For someone whose job it is do deal with very sick people each day like some first responders, I would think that would be a serious consideration.  And notably, the argument that the immuno-suppressed population can be vaccinated to avoid COVID isn't always true.  I seriously doubt my wife could have been vaccinated due to the chemo she was undergoing - meaning she would have to rely on the care others took to avoid being contagious.  I wasn't going to post but I think its worthy food for thought.

Sorry to hear this.  I was nervous when you mentioned your house being infected.  

It's easy to discuss these things when they're theoretical, but very tough when it involves people you work with, know or love. 

You guys will continue to be in our prayers, and please let me know if I can help out in any way. 

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